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Fin whale underwater.  The fin whale is the second longest and sixth most massive animal ever, reaching lengths of 88 feet, Balaenoptera physalus, La Jolla, California Two satellite tags, below dorsal fin of great white shark.  The tags record the sharks movements, relaying data to researchers via satellite, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Adult male killer whale, tall dorsal fin, Palos Verdes, Orcinus orca Dorsal fin of a great white shark breaks the surface as the shark swims just below, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Great white shark, dorsal fin extended out of the water as it swims near the surface, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark bearing a white plastic researcher's identification ID tag near its dorsal fin swims through the clear waters of Isla Guadalupe, far offshore of the Pacific Coast of Baja California.  Guadalupe Island is host to a concentration of large great white sharks, which visit the island to feed on pinnipeds and tuna, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Fin whale underwater.  The fin whale is the second longest and sixth most massive animal ever, reaching lengths of 88 feet, Balaenoptera physalus, La Jolla, California Saddle patch and dorsal fins of killer whales, Palos Verdes, Orcinus orca Fin whale dorsal fin.  The fin whale is named for its tall, falcate dorsal fin.  Mariners often refer to them as finback whales.  Coronado Islands, Mexico (northern Baja California, near San Diego), Balaenoptera physalus, Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Tiger shark with GoPro mounted on its dorsal fin, Galeocerdo cuvier Rissos dolphin.  Note distinguishing and highly variable skin and dorsal fin patterns, characteristic of this species. White scarring, likely caused by other Risso dolphins teeth, accumulates during the dolphins life so that adult Rissos dolphins are usually almost entirely white, Grampus griseus, San Diego, California Rissos dolphin.  Note distinguishing and highly variable skin and dorsal fin patterns, characteristic of this species. White scarring, likely caused by other Risso dolphins teeth, accumulates during the dolphins life so that adult Rissos dolphins are usually almost entirely white, Grampus griseus, San Diego, California Dorsal fin of a great white shark breaks the surface as the shark swims just below, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Great white shark, dorsal fin extended out of the water as it swims near the surface, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark swims away, showing its powerful caudal fin (tail), short anal fins on its underside, tall dorsal fin on top and sweeping winglike pectoral fins, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Rissos dolphin surfacing with eye showing. Note distinguishing and highly variable skin and dorsal fin patterns, characteristic of this species. White scarring, likely caused by other Risso dolphins teeth, accumulates during the dolphins life so that adult Rissos dolphins are almost entirely white.  San Diego, Grampus griseus Rissos dolphin, breaching. Note distinguishing and highly variable skin and dorsal fin patterns, characteristic of this species. White scarring, likely caused by other Risso dolphins teeth, accumulates during the dolphins life so that adult Rissos dolphins are almost entirely white. San Diego, Grampus griseus A Rissos dolphin leaps from the ocean in a full breach. Note distinguishing and highly variable skin and dorsal fin patterns, characteristic of this species.  White scarring, likely caused by other Risso dolphins teeth, accumulates during the dolphins life so that adult Rissos dolphins are almost entirely white.  Offshore near San Diego, Grampus griseus Fin whale dorsal fin.  The fin whale is named for its tall, falcate dorsal fin.  Mariners often refer to them as finback whales.  Coronado Islands, Mexico (northern Baja California, near San Diego), Balaenoptera physalus, Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado) An enormous blue whale rounds out (hunches up its back) before diving.  Note the distinctive mottled skin pattern and small, falcate dorsal fin. Open ocean offshore of San Diego, Balaenoptera musculus An enormous blue whale rounds out (hunches up its back) before diving.  Note the distinctive mottled skin pattern and small, falcate dorsal fin. Open ocean offshore of San Diego, Balaenoptera musculus Great white shark, research identification photograph.  A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column. The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Desert iguana, one of the most common lizards of the Sonoran and Mojave deserts of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, Dipsosaurus dorsalis, Joshua Tree National Park, California Gray whale dorsal ridge (back) at the surface in front of a boat full of whale watchers, Cow Bay, Flores Island, near Tofino, Clayoquot Sound, west coast of Vancouver Island, Eschrichtius robustus Saddle patch and dorsal fin of a killer whale, Palos Verdes, Orcinus orca Desert iguana, one of the most common lizards of the Sonoran and Mojave deserts of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, Dipsosaurus dorsalis, Joshua Tree National Park, California North Pacific Yellowtail, Seriola lalandi, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) North Pacific Yellowtail school under a patch of drift kelp, open ocean, Seriola lalandi, San Diego, California Silky shark, dorsal fin breaking surface, Carcharhinus falciformis, Cocos Island Gray whale dorsal aspect showing blowhole and characteristic skin mottling and ectoparasitic barnacles and whale lice (amphipod crustaceans), Eschrichtius robustus, San Diego, California Desert iguana, one of the most common lizards of the Sonoran and Mojave deserts of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, Dipsosaurus dorsalis, Joshua Tree National Park, California Desert iguana, one of the most common lizards of the Sonoran and Mojave deserts of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, Dipsosaurus dorsalis, Joshua Tree National Park, California Desert iguana, one of the most common lizards of the Sonoran and Mojave deserts of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, Dipsosaurus dorsalis, Joshua Tree National Park, California Giant damselfish, Sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico, Microspathodon dorsalis Gray whale dorsal aspect showing blowhole and characteristic skin mottling and ectoparasitic barnacles and whale lice (amphipod crustaceans), Eschrichtius robustus, San Diego, California Killer Whale, Biggs Transient Orca, Palos Verdes Killer Whales, Biggs Transient Orcas, Palos Verdes Killer Whales, Biggs Transient Orcas, Palos Verdes   more ...

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Updated: October 22, 2017