Search results for Eureka Dune Grass

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Young brown bear stands in tall sedge grass to get a better view of other approaching bears, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Young brown bear stands in tall sedge grass to get a better view of other approaching bears.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19143  
Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass. Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19147  
Full grown, mature male coastal brown bear boar (grizzly bear) in sedge grass meadows, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Full grown, mature male coastal brown bear boar (grizzly bear) in sedge grass meadows.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19151  
A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19153  
Brown bear female sow in sedge meadow, with her three spring cubs hidden by the deep grass next to her.  These cubs were born earlier in the spring and will remain with their mother for almost two years, relying on her completely for their survival, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Brown bear female sow in sedge meadow, with her three spring cubs hidden by the deep grass next to her. These cubs were born earlier in the spring and will remain with their mother for almost two years, relying on her completely for their survival.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19154  
Coastal brown bear in meadow.  The tall sedge grasses in this coastal meadow are a food source for brown bears, who may eat 30 lbs of it each day during summer while waiting for their preferred food, salmon, to arrive in the nearby rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Coastal brown bear in meadow. The tall sedge grasses in this coastal meadow are a food source for brown bears, who may eat 30 lbs of it each day during summer while waiting for their preferred food, salmon, to arrive in the nearby rivers.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19155  
Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass. Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19156  
Portrait of a young brown bear, pausing while grazing in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Portrait of a young brown bear, pausing while grazing in tall sedge grass. Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19157  
A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19158  
Lazy grizzly bear naps on a log, surrounding by the grass sedge grass that is typical of the coastal region of Lake Clark National Park, Ursus arctos
Lazy grizzly bear naps on a log, surrounding by the grass sedge grass that is typical of the coastal region of Lake Clark National Park.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19160  
Full grown, mature male coastal brown bear boar (grizzly bear) in sedge grass meadows, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Full grown, mature male coastal brown bear boar (grizzly bear) in sedge grass meadows.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19161  
A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19162  
Coastal brown bear in sedge grass meadow, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Coastal brown bear in sedge grass meadow.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19223  
Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass. Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19244  
Panorama of the Wave.  The Wave is a sweeping, dramatic display of eroded sandstone, forged by eons of water and wind erosion, laying bare striations formed from compacted sand dunes over millenia.  This panoramic picture is formed from thirteen individual photographs, North Coyote Buttes, Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness, Arizona
Panorama of the Wave. The Wave is a sweeping, dramatic display of eroded sandstone, forged by eons of water and wind erosion, laying bare striations formed from compacted sand dunes over millenia. This panoramic picture is formed from thirteen individual photographs.
Location: North Coyote Buttes, Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness, Arizona
Image ID: 20700  
Panorama dimensions: 4661 x 25458
Coastal brown bear (grizzly bear) walks sedge grass meadow near Silver Salmon Creek, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Coastal brown bear (grizzly bear) walks sedge grass meadow near Silver Salmon Creek.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19145  
Sunset on the Last Chance Mountain Range, seen from Eureka Valley Sand Dunes, Eureka Dunes, Death Valley National Park, California
Sunset on the Last Chance Mountain Range, seen from Eureka Valley Sand Dunes.
Location: Eureka Dunes, Death Valley National Park, California
Image ID: 25238  
Grizzly bear, autumn, fall, brown grasses, Ursus arctos horribilis, Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Grizzly bear, autumn, fall, brown grasses.
Species: Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos horribilis
Location: Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19614  
Kelp frond showing pneumatocysts, Macrocystis pyrifera, Santa Barbara Island
Kelp frond showing pneumatocysts.
Species: Giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera
Location: Santa Barbara Island, California
Image ID: 02435  
Oil Rig Eureka, Underwater Structure and invertebrate Life, Corynactis californica, Long Beach, California
Oil Rig Eureka, Underwater Structure and invertebrate Life.
Species: Strawberry anemone, Corynactis californica
Location: Long Beach, California
Image ID: 34660  
Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers.  This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest, Cervus canadensis roosevelti, Redwood National Park, California
Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers. This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest.
Species: Roosevelt elk, Cervus canadensis roosevelti
Location: Redwood National Park, California
Image ID: 25890  
California sea lion at oil rig Eureka, underwater, among the pilings supporting the oil rig, Zalophus californianus, Long Beach
California sea lion at oil rig Eureka, underwater, among the pilings supporting the oil rig.
Species: California sea lion, Zalophus californianus
Location: Long Beach, California
Image ID: 31087  
California sea lion at oil rig Eureka, underwater, among the pilings supporting the oil rig, Zalophus californianus, Long Beach
California sea lion at oil rig Eureka, underwater, among the pilings supporting the oil rig.
Species: California sea lion, Zalophus californianus
Location: Long Beach, California
Image ID: 31088  
Kelp fronds and pneumatocysts.  Pneumatocysts, gas-filled bladders, float the kelp plant off the ocean bottom toward the surface and sunlight, where the leaf-like blades and stipes of the kelp plant grow fastest.  Giant kelp can grow up to 2' in a single day given optimal conditions.  Epic submarine forests of kelp grow throughout California's Southern Channel Islands, Macrocystis pyrifera, San Clemente Island
Kelp fronds and pneumatocysts. Pneumatocysts, gas-filled bladders, float the kelp plant off the ocean bottom toward the surface and sunlight, where the leaf-like blades and stipes of the kelp plant grow fastest. Giant kelp can grow up to 2' in a single day given optimal conditions. Epic submarine forests of kelp grow throughout California's Southern Channel Islands.
Species: Giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera
Location: San Clemente Island, California
Image ID: 25396  
Eureka Dunes.  The Eureka Valley Sand Dunes are California's tallest sand dunes, and one of the tallest in the United States.  Rising 680' above the floor of the Eureka Valley, the Eureka sand dunes are home to several endangered species, as well as "singing sand" that makes strange sounds when it shifts.  Located in the remote northern portion of Death Valley National Park, the Eureka Dunes see very few visitors
Eureka Dunes. The Eureka Valley Sand Dunes are California's tallest sand dunes, and one of the tallest in the United States. Rising 680' above the floor of the Eureka Valley, the Eureka sand dunes are home to several endangered species, as well as "singing sand" that makes strange sounds when it shifts. Located in the remote northern portion of Death Valley National Park, the Eureka Dunes see very few visitors.
Location: Eureka Dunes, Death Valley National Park, California
Image ID: 25250  
Mesquite Dunes sunrise, dawn, clouds and morning sky, sand dunes, Stovepipe Wells, Death Valley National Park, California
Mesquite Dunes sunrise, dawn, clouds and morning sky, sand dunes.
Location: Stovepipe Wells, Death Valley National Park, California
Image ID: 28688  
Kelp fronds and pneumatocysts. Pneumatocysts, gas-filled bladders, float the kelp off the ocean bottom toward the surface and sunlight, where the leaf-like blades and stipes of the kelp plant grow fastest. Catalina Island, California, Macrocystis pyrifera
Kelp fronds and pneumatocysts. Pneumatocysts, gas-filled bladders, float the kelp off the ocean bottom toward the surface and sunlight, where the leaf-like blades and stipes of the kelp plant grow fastest. Catalina Island, California.
Species: Giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera
Location: Catalina Island, California
Image ID: 37282  
The Kelp Forest offshore of La Jolla, California. A kelp forest. Giant kelp grows rapidly, up to 2' per day, from the rocky reef on the ocean bottom to which it is anchored, toward the ocean surface where it spreads to form a thick canopy. Myriad species of fishes, mammals and invertebrates form a rich community in the kelp forest. Lush forests of kelp are found throughout California's Southern Channel Islands, Macrocystis pyrifera
The Kelp Forest offshore of La Jolla, California. A kelp forest. Giant kelp grows rapidly, up to 2' per day, from the rocky reef on the ocean bottom to which it is anchored, toward the ocean surface where it spreads to form a thick canopy. Myriad species of fishes, mammals and invertebrates form a rich community in the kelp forest. Lush forests of kelp are found throughout California's Southern Channel Islands.
Species: Giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera
Image ID: 30986  
Dune Evening Primrose bloom in Anza Borrego Desert State Park, during the 2017 Superbloom, Oenothera deltoides, Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, Borrego Springs, California
Dune Evening Primrose bloom in Anza Borrego Desert State Park, during the 2017 Superbloom.
Species: Dune evening primrose, Oenothera deltoides
Location: Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, Borrego Springs, California
Image ID: 33168  
Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers.  This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest, Cervus canadensis roosevelti, Redwood National Park, California
Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers. This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest.
Species: Roosevelt elk, Cervus canadensis roosevelti
Location: Redwood National Park, California
Image ID: 25878