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Humpback whale breaching with pectoral fins lifting spray from the ocean surface, Megaptera novaeangliae, Maui Fin whale underwater. The fin whale is the second longest and sixth most massive animal ever, reaching lengths of 88 feet, Balaenoptera physalus Fin whale underwater. The fin whale is the second longest and sixth most massive animal ever, reaching lengths of 88 feet, Balaenoptera physalus Fin whale underwater.  The fin whale is the second longest and sixth most massive animal ever, reaching lengths of 88 feet, Balaenoptera physalus, La Jolla, California Fin Whale, Aerial Photo, Baja California, Balaenoptera physalus Humpback whale breaching, pectoral fin and rostrom visible, Megaptera novaeangliae, San Diego, California Humpback whale breaching, pectoral fin and rostrom visible, Megaptera novaeangliae, San Diego, California Adult male killer whale, tall dorsal fin, Palos Verdes, Orcinus orca Fin whale underwater.  The fin whale is the second longest and sixth most massive animal ever, reaching lengths of 88 feet, Balaenoptera physalus, La Jolla, California Saddle patch and dorsal fins of killer whales, Palos Verdes, Orcinus orca Fin whale dorsal fin.  The fin whale is named for its tall, falcate dorsal fin.  Mariners often refer to them as finback whales.  Coronado Islands, Mexico (northern Baja California, near San Diego), Balaenoptera physalus, Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado) Humpback whale breaching, pectoral fin and rostrom visible, Megaptera novaeangliae, San Diego, California A fin whale blows at the surface between dives.  Coronado Islands, Mexico (northern Baja California, near San Diego), Balaenoptera physalus, Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado) Rissos dolphin.  Note distinguishing and highly variable skin and dorsal fin patterns, characteristic of this species. White scarring, likely caused by other Risso dolphins teeth, accumulates during the dolphins life so that adult Rissos dolphins are usually almost entirely white, Grampus griseus, San Diego, California Rissos dolphin.  Note distinguishing and highly variable skin and dorsal fin patterns, characteristic of this species. White scarring, likely caused by other Risso dolphins teeth, accumulates during the dolphins life so that adult Rissos dolphins are usually almost entirely white, Grampus griseus, San Diego, California Rissos dolphin surfacing with eye showing. Note distinguishing and highly variable skin and dorsal fin patterns, characteristic of this species. White scarring, likely caused by other Risso dolphins teeth, accumulates during the dolphins life so that adult Rissos dolphins are almost entirely white.  San Diego, Grampus griseus Rissos dolphin, breaching. Note distinguishing and highly variable skin and dorsal fin patterns, characteristic of this species. White scarring, likely caused by other Risso dolphins teeth, accumulates during the dolphins life so that adult Rissos dolphins are almost entirely white. San Diego, Grampus griseus Courting gray whales, Laguna San Ignacio, Eschrichtius robustus, San Ignacio Lagoon A Rissos dolphin leaps from the ocean in a full breach. Note distinguishing and highly variable skin and dorsal fin patterns, characteristic of this species.  White scarring, likely caused by other Risso dolphins teeth, accumulates during the dolphins life so that adult Rissos dolphins are almost entirely white.  Offshore near San Diego, Grampus griseus Fin whale dorsal fin.  The fin whale is named for its tall, falcate dorsal fin.  Mariners often refer to them as finback whales.  Coronado Islands, Mexico (northern Baja California, near San Diego), Balaenoptera physalus, Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado) An enormous blue whale rounds out (hunches up its back) before diving.  Note the distinctive mottled skin pattern and small, falcate dorsal fin. Open ocean offshore of San Diego, Balaenoptera musculus An enormous blue whale rounds out (hunches up its back) before diving.  Note the distinctive mottled skin pattern and small, falcate dorsal fin. Open ocean offshore of San Diego, Balaenoptera musculus Fin Whale, defecating red krill waste from recent feeding, Aerial Photo, Baja California, Balaenoptera physalus Gray whale, raising its fluke (tail) before diving to the ocean floor to forage for crustaceans, , Cow Bay, Flores Island, near Tofino, Clayoquot Sound, west coast of Vancouver Island, Eschrichtius robustus Gray whale dorsal ridge (back) at the surface in front of a boat full of whale watchers, Cow Bay, Flores Island, near Tofino, Clayoquot Sound, west coast of Vancouver Island, Eschrichtius robustus Fin Whale, Aerial Photo, Baja California, Balaenoptera physalus Saddle patch and dorsal fin of a killer whale, Palos Verdes, Orcinus orca Humpback whale with one of its long pectoral fins raised aloft out of the water, swimming on its side (laterally) as it does so, Megaptera novaeangliae, Maui Male humpback whale with head raised out of the water, braking and pushing back at another whale by using pectoral fins spread in a "crucifix block", during surface active social behaviours, Megaptera novaeangliae, Maui Fin whale underwater. The fin whale is the second longest and sixth most massive animal ever, reaching lengths of 88 feet, Balaenoptera physalus Gray whale raising its fluke (tail) in front of a boat of whale watchers before diving to the ocean floor to forage for crustaceans, Cow Bay, Flores Island, near Tofino, Clayoquot Sound, west coast of Vancouver Island, Eschrichtius robustus Killer Whale, Biggs Transient Orca, Palos Verdes Killer Whales, Biggs Transient Orcas, Palos Verdes Killer Whales, Biggs Transient Orcas, Palos Verdes Killer Whale, Biggs Transient Orca, Palos Verdes Killer Whale, Biggs Transient Orca, Palos Verdes Fin whale, Balaenoptera physalus, Scotia Sea A humpback whale raises it pectoral fin out of the water, the coast of Del Mar and La Jolla is visible in the distance, Megaptera novaeangliae Humpback whale dorsal fin, one of the identifiable characteristics researchers use to capture/recapture humpback whales from year to year, Megaptera novaeangliae, Santa Rosa Island, California Fin whale dorsal fin. The fin whale is the second longest and sixth most massive animal ever, reaching lengths of 88 feet, Balaenoptera physalus, La Jolla, California Blue whale rounding out at surface with dorsal fin visible, before diving for food, showing characteristic blue/gray mottled skin pattern, Balaenoptera musculus, Dana Point, California Male humpback whale with head raised out of the water, braking and pushing back at another whale by using pectoral fins spread in a "crucifix block", during surface active social behaviours, Megaptera novaeangliae, Maui Humpback whale swimming with raised pectoral fin (ventral aspect), Megaptera novaeangliae, Maui North Pacific humpback whale showing extensive scarring, almost certainly from a boat propeller, on dorsal ridge, Megaptera novaeangliae, Maui Fin whale underwater.  The fin whale is the second longest and sixth most massive animal ever, reaching lengths of 88 feet, Balaenoptera physalus, La Jolla, California Krill and squid school at the ocean surface, moments before blue and fin whales rise to the surface to feed.  The krill is likely Euphausia pacifica, the squid are likely Loligo opalescens. A thin cloud of pink krill gathers at the ocean surface, where it is likely to be preyed upon by sharks, fish, birds and whales, Loligo opalescens, Euphausia pacifica, San Diego, California Fin Whale, Aerial Photo, Baja California, Balaenoptera physalus Fin Whale, Aerial Photo, Baja California, Balaenoptera physalus Fin whale, Balaenoptera physalus, Scotia Sea Humpback whales lunge feed on Antarctic krill, engulfing huge mouthfuls of the tiny crustacean, Megaptera novaeangliae, Gerlache Strait   more ...

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Updated: October 22, 2017