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Surf grass on the rocky reef -- appearing blurred in this time exposure -- is tossed back and forth by powerful ocean waves passing by above.  San Clemente Island, Phyllospadix Half Dome and nighttime stars, viewed from Glacier Point, Yosemite National Park, California Waves rush in at sunset, Carlsbad beach sunset and ocean waves, seascape, dusk, summer Lunar Eclipse Sequence Over Broken Hill, Torrey Pines State Reserve. While the moon lies in the full shadow of the earth (umbra) it receives only faint, red-tinged light refracted through the Earth's atmosphere. As the moon passes into the penumbra it receives increasing amounts of direct sunlight, eventually leaving the shadow of the Earth altogether. October 8, 2014, San Diego, California Milky Way and Stars over Broken Arch, Arches National Park, Utah San Diego Bay and Skyline at sunset, viewed from Point Loma, panoramic photograph SIO Pier.  The Scripps Institution of Oceanography research pier is 1090 feet long and was built of reinforced concrete in 1988, replacing the original wooden pier built in 1915. The Scripps Pier is home to a variety of sensing equipment above and below water that collects various oceanographic data. The Scripps research diving facility is located at the foot of the pier. Fresh seawater is pumped from the pier to the many tanks and facilities of SIO, including the Birch Aquarium. The Scripps Pier is named in honor of Ellen Browning Scripps, the most significant donor and benefactor of the Institution, La Jolla, California Hotel del Coronado, known affectionately as the Hotel Del.  It was once the largest hotel in the world, and is one of the few remaining wooden Victorian beach resorts.  It sits on the beach on Coronado Island, seen here with downtown San Diego in the distance.  It is widely considered to be one of Americas most beautiful and classic hotels. Built in 1888, it was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1977 Vogelsang Peak (11516') at sunset, reflected in a small creek near Vogelsang High Sierra Camp in Yosemite's high country, Yosemite National Park, California The Fire Wave, a beautiful sandstone formation exhibiting dramatic striations, striped layers in the geologic historical record, Valley of Fire State Park Turret Arch through North Window, winter, sunrise, Arches National Park, Utah Self portrait at sunrise, panorama of Crater Lake.  Crater Lake is the six-mile wide lake inside the collapsed caldera of volcanic Mount Mazama. Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States and the seventh-deepest in the world. Its maximum recorded depth is 1996 feet (608m). It lies at an altitude of 6178 feet (1880m), Crater Lake National Park Yaletown section of Vancouver at night, including Granville Island bridge (left), viewed from Granville Island with sailboat in the foreground Red gorgonian on rocky reef, below kelp forest, underwater.  The red gorgonian is a filter-feeding temperate colonial species that lives on the rocky bottom at depths between 50 to 200 feet deep. Gorgonians are oriented at right angles to prevailing water currents to capture plankton drifting by, Lophogorgia chilensis, San Clemente Island Mobius Arch in the Alabama Hills, seen here at night with swirling star trails formed in the sky above due to a long time exposure, Alabama Hills Recreational Area Scripps Pier, predawn abstract study of pier pilings and moving water, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California Racetrack sailing stone and star trails.  A sliding rock of the Racetrack Playa. The sliding rocks, or sailing stones, move across the mud flats of the Racetrack Playa, leaving trails behind in the mud. The explanation for their movement is not known with certainty, but many believe wind pushes the rocks over wet and perhaps icy mud in winter, Death Valley National Park, California Sailing stone on the Racetrack Playa. The sliding rocks, or sailing stones, move across the mud flats of the Racetrack Playa, leaving trails behind in the mud. The explanation for their movement is not known with certainty, but many believe wind pushes the rocks over wet and perhaps icy mud in winter, Death Valley National Park, California Sunset at Dead Horse Point Overlook, with the Colorado River flowing 2,000 feet below. 300 million years of erosion has carved the expansive canyons, cliffs and walls below and surrounding Deadhorse Point, Dead Horse Point State Park, Utah Torrey Pines Cliffs lit at night by a full moon, low tide reflections, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California Torrey Pines Cliffs and Pacific Ocean, Razor Point view to La Jolla, San Diego, California, Torrey Pines State Reserve Star Trails over Sky Rock. Sky Rock petroglyphs near Bishop, California. Hidden atop an enormous boulder in the Volcanic Tablelands lies Sky Rock, a set of petroglyphs that face the sky. These superb examples of native American petroglyph artwork are thought to be Paiute in origin, but little is known about them Milky Way over Tioga Lake, Yosemite National Park A large, powerful wave breaks with offshore winds at the Wedge in Newport Beach, The Wedge Joshua Tree National Park, California Lower Antelope Canyon, a deep, narrow and spectacular slot canyon lying on Navajo Tribal lands near Page, Arizona, Navajo Tribal Lands The Virgin River Narrows, where the Virgin River has carved deep, narrow canyons through the Zion National Park sandstone, creating one of the finest hikes in the world Milky Way over the Watchman, Zion National Park.  The Milky Way galaxy rises in the night sky above the the Watchman The Wave in the North Coyote Buttes, an area of fantastic eroded sandstone featuring beautiful swirls, wild colors, countless striations, and bizarre shapes set amidst the dramatic surrounding North Coyote Buttes of Arizona and Utah. The sandstone formations of the North Coyote Buttes, including the Wave, date from the Jurassic period. Managed by the Bureau of Land Management, the Wave is located in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness and is accessible on foot by permit only Crater Lake and Wizard Island at sunrise, Crater Lake National Park, Oregon Venus sets over Manley Beacon and the Panamint Mountains, viewed from Zabriskie Point, landscape lit by a full moon, evening, stars, Death Valley National Park, California Mesquite Dunes sunrise, dawn, clouds and morning sky, sand dunes, Stovepipe Wells, Death Valley National Park, California El Capitan and clouds lit by full moon, stars, evening, Yosemite National Park, California Moutain climbers light see upon Mount Rainier, Milky Way and stars at night above Mount Rainier, Sunrise, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington Mount Rainier reflected in Tipsoo Lake, Tipsoo Lakes, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington Mount Rainier and alpine wildflowers, Tipsoo Lakes, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington Sunrise light on Turret Arch viewed through North Window, winter, Arches National Park, Utah The Wave, an area of fantastic eroded sandstone featuring beautiful swirls, wild colors, countless striations, and bizarre shapes set amidst the dramatic surrounding North Coyote Buttes of Arizona and Utah.  The sandstone formations of the North Coyote Buttes, including the Wave, date from the Jurassic period. Managed by the Bureau of Land Management, the Wave is located in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness and is accessible on foot by permit only Joshua Trees in early morning light, Yucca brevifolia, Joshua Tree National Park Upper Yosemite Falls and lunar rainbow, moonbow. A lunar rainbow (moonbow) can be seen to the left of Yosemite Falls, where the moon illuminates the spray of the falls, Yosemite National Park, California Sunset falls upon Torrey Pines State Reserve, viewed from the Torrey Pines glider port.  La Jolla, Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Scripps Pier are seen in the distance Los Islotes Island, Espiritu Santo Biosphere Reserve, Sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico Breaking wave, tube, hollow barrel, morning surf Hydrocoral, Farnsworth Banks, Stylaster californicus, Allopora californica, Catalina Island The Fire Wave by Moonlight, stars and the night sky, Valley of Fire State Park Panoramic Aerial Photo of San Diego Coronado Bay Bridge Torrey Pines cliffs and storm clouds at sunset, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California Sunlight streams through giant kelp forest. Giant kelp, the fastest growing plant on Earth, reaches from the rocky reef to the ocean's surface like a submarine forest, Macrocystis pyrifera, Catalina Island Sunlight streams through giant kelp forest. Giant kelp, the fastest growing plant on Earth, reaches from the rocky reef to the ocean's surface like a submarine forest, Macrocystis pyrifera, Catalina Island Sunlight streams through giant kelp forest. Giant kelp, the fastest growing plant on Earth, reaches from the rocky reef to the ocean's surface like a submarine forest, Macrocystis pyrifera, Catalina Island

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Updated: October 21, 2018