Stock Photos of Alaska


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Bald eagle, closeup of head and shoulders showing distinctive white head feathers, yellow beak and brown body and wings, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Haliaeetus leucocephalus washingtoniensis, Kachemak Bay, Homer, Alaska Alaskan brown bear catching a jumping salmon, Brooks Falls, Ursus arctos, Brooks River, Katmai National Park A large, old brown bear (grizzly bear) wades across Brooks River. Coastal and near-coastal brown bears in Alaska can live to 25 years of age, weigh up to 1400 lbs and stand over 9 feet tall, Ursus arctos, Katmai National Park Full grown, mature male coastal brown bear boar (grizzly bear) in sedge grass meadows, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Bald eagle makes a splash while in flight as it takes a fish out of the water, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Haliaeetus leucocephalus washingtoniensis, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska Portrait of a young brown bear, pausing while grazing in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Bald eagle in flight, wing spread, soaring, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Haliaeetus leucocephalus washingtoniensis, Kachemak Bay, Homer, Alaska Two bald eagles on perch, one with wings spread as it has just landed and is adjusting its balance, the second with its head thrown back, calling vocalizing, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Haliaeetus leucocephalus washingtoniensis, Kachemak Bay, Homer, Alaska Bald eagle spreads its wings to land amid a large group of bald eagles, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Haliaeetus leucocephalus washingtoniensis, Kachemak Bay, Homer, Alaska Bald eagle in flight, wing spread, aloft, soaring, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Haliaeetus leucocephalus washingtoniensis, Kachemak Bay, Homer, Alaska Bald eagle in flight, Kachemak Bay and the Kenai Mountains in the background, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Haliaeetus leucocephalus washingtoniensis, Homer, Alaska Bald eagle in flight, spreads its wings wide to slow before landing on a wooden perch, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Haliaeetus leucocephalus washingtoniensis, Kachemak Bay, Homer, Alaska Steller sea lions (Northern sea lions) gather on rocks.  Steller sea lions are the largest members of the Otariid (eared seal) family.  Males can weigh up to 2400 lb, females up to 770 lb, Eumetopias jubatus, Chiswell Islands, Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska Juvenile bald eagle, second year coloration plumage, closeup of head and shoulders, looking directly at camera, snowflakes visible on feathers.    Immature coloration showing white speckling on feathers, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Haliaeetus leucocephalus washingtoniensis, Kachemak Bay, Homer, Alaska Two bald eagles in flight, wings spread, soaring, aloft, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Haliaeetus leucocephalus washingtoniensis, Kachemak Bay, Homer, Alaska Five bald eagles stand together on wooden perch, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Haliaeetus leucocephalus washingtoniensis, Kachemak Bay, Homer, Alaska Bald eagle in flight, snow covered beach and Kachemak Bay in background, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Haliaeetus leucocephalus washingtoniensis, Homer, Alaska Bald eagle in flight spreads its wings and raises its talons as it prepares to grasp a fish out of the water, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Haliaeetus leucocephalus washingtoniensis, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska Two mature brown bears fight to establish hierarchy and fishing rights, Ursus arctos, Brooks River, Katmai National Park, Alaska Brown bear waits for salmon at Brooks Falls. Blurring of the water is caused by a long shutter speed. Brooks River, Ursus arctos, Katmai National Park, Alaska Brown bear walks on tide flats.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Juvenile female coastal brown bear (grizzly bear) grazes on sedge grass, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear in meadow.  The tall sedge grasses in this coastal meadow are a food source for brown bears, who may eat 30 lbs of it each day during summer while waiting for their preferred food, salmon, to arrive in the nearby rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Juvenile female brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear on sand flats at low tide, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Young brown bear stands in tall sedge grass to get a better view of other approaching bears, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear walking on sand beach, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear walks in Silver Salmon Creek, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Brown bears fighting or sparring.  These are likely young but sexually mature males that are simply mock fighting for practice, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Mature male coastal brown bear boar waits on the tide flats at the mouth of Silver Salmon Creek for salmon to arrive.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Brown bear cubs.  These cubs are one and a half years old and have yet to leave their mother.  They will be on their own and have to fend for themselves next summer, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Full grown, mature male coastal brown bear boar (grizzly bear) in sedge grass meadows, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Brown bear female sow in sedge meadow, with her three spring cubs hidden by the deep grass next to her.  These cubs were born earlier in the spring and will remain with their mother for almost two years, relying on her completely for their survival, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear in meadow.  The tall sedge grasses in this coastal meadow are a food source for brown bears, who may eat 30 lbs of it each day during summer while waiting for their preferred food, salmon, to arrive in the nearby rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Portrait of a young brown bear, pausing while grazing in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear cub, one and a half years old, near Johnson River.  This cub will remain with its mother for about another six months, and will be on its own next year, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Lazy grizzly bear naps on a log, surrounding by the grass sedge grass that is typical of the coastal region of Lake Clark National Park, Ursus arctos Full grown, mature male coastal brown bear boar (grizzly bear) in sedge grass meadows, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear on sand flats at low tide, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Juvenile female coastal brown bear walks on beach, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear cub, one and a half years old, near Johnson River.  This cub will remain with its mother for about another six months, and will be on its own next year, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear in sedge grass meadow, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska   more ...

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Updated: October 17, 2017