Stock Photos of Wyoming

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Mount Moran in the Teton Range rises above Jackson Lake, summer, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Mount Moran in the Teton Range rises above Jackson Lake, summer.
Location: Jackson Lake, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 07768  
Panorama of the Teton Range, in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.  The Teton peaks are seen together at center with Mount Moran to the right.  The Snake River lies unseen in the valley below
Panorama of the Teton Range, in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. The Teton peaks are seen together at center with Mount Moran to the right. The Snake River lies unseen in the valley below.
Location: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 26920  
Panorama dimensions: 5405 x 15576
T.A. Moulton barn with Teton Range, on Mormon Row in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
T.A. Moulton barn with Teton Range, on Mormon Row in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.
Location: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 26914  
White Dome Geyser, rises to a height of 30 feet or more, and typically erupts with an interval of 15 to 30 minutes. It is located along Firehole Lake Drive, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
White Dome Geyser, rises to a height of 30 feet or more, and typically erupts with an interval of 15 to 30 minutes. It is located along Firehole Lake Drive.
Location: Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 26949  
Grand Prismatic Spring displays brilliant colors along its edges, created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges. The outer orange and red regions are the coolest water in the spring, where the overflow runs off, Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Grand Prismatic Spring displays brilliant colors along its edges, created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges. The outer orange and red regions are the coolest water in the spring, where the overflow runs off.
Location: Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 07265  
Morning Glory Pool has long been considered a must-see site in Yellowstone. At one time a road brought visitors to its brink. Over the years they threw coins, bottles and trash in the pool, reducing its flow and causing the red and orange bacteria to creep in from its edge, replacing the blue bacteria that thrive in the hotter water at the center of the pool. The pool is now accessed only by a foot path. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Morning Glory Pool has long been considered a must-see site in Yellowstone. At one time a road brought visitors to its brink. Over the years they threw coins, bottles and trash in the pool, reducing its flow and causing the red and orange bacteria to creep in from its edge, replacing the blue bacteria that thrive in the hotter water at the center of the pool. The pool is now accessed only by a foot path. Upper Geyser Basin.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 07268  
Elk graze and rest among wildflowers blooming in the Gibbon Meadow, summer, Cervus canadensis, Gibbon Meadows, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Elk graze and rest among wildflowers blooming in the Gibbon Meadow, summer.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Gibbon Meadows, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13159  
Elk in the Gibbon River, Cervus canadensis, Gibbon Meadows, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Elk in the Gibbon River.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Gibbon Meadows, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13164  
Anemone Geyser erupts, Old Faithful Inn visible in the distance.  Anemone Geyser cycles about every 7 minutes.  First the pools fills, then overflows, then bubbles and splashes before erupting.  The eruption empties the pools and the cycle begins anew.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Anemone Geyser erupts, Old Faithful Inn visible in the distance. Anemone Geyser cycles about every 7 minutes. First the pools fills, then overflows, then bubbles and splashes before erupting. The eruption empties the pools and the cycle begins anew. Upper Geyser Basin.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13394  
Large male elk (bull) in snow covered meadow near Madison River.  Only male elk have antlers, which start growing in the spring and are shed each winter. The largest antlers may be 4 feet long and weigh up to 40 pounds. Antlers are made of bone which can grow up to one inch per day. While growing, the antlers are covered with and protected by a soft layer of highly vascularised skin known as velvet. The velvet is shed in the summer when the antlers have fully developed. Bull elk may have six or more tines on each antler, however the number of tines has little to do with the age or maturity of a particular animal, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Large male elk (bull) in snow covered meadow near Madison River. Only male elk have antlers, which start growing in the spring and are shed each winter. The largest antlers may be 4 feet long and weigh up to 40 pounds. Antlers are made of bone which can grow up to one inch per day. While growing, the antlers are covered with and protected by a soft layer of highly vascularised skin known as velvet. The velvet is shed in the summer when the antlers have fully developed. Bull elk may have six or more tines on each antler, however the number of tines has little to do with the age or maturity of a particular animal.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19692  
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19695  
Female elk along the Madison River during an early fall snow, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Female elk along the Madison River during an early fall snow.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Madison River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19701  
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19703  
Juvenile elk in golden, late afternoon light, in meadow along Madison River, autumn, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Juvenile elk in golden, late afternoon light, in meadow along Madison River, autumn.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19704  
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19708  
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19714  
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Madison River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Madison River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19716  
Teton Range and Antelope Flat wildflowers, sunrise, clouds, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Teton Range and Antelope Flat wildflowers, sunrise, clouds.
Location: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 26916  
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19699  
Old Faithful geyser, peak eruption, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Old Faithful geyser, peak eruption.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 07179  
Rocky shallows in Jackson Lake with Mount Moran in the background, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Rocky shallows in Jackson Lake with Mount Moran in the background.
Location: Jackson Lake, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 07410  
Snow covers the rocks and cliffs around Lower Yellowstone Falls in winter. At 308 feet, the Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River is the tallest fall in the park. This view is from Lookout Point on the North side of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Snow covers the rocks and cliffs around Lower Yellowstone Falls in winter. At 308 feet, the Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River is the tallest fall in the park. This view is from Lookout Point on the North side of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.
Location: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19575  
The Teton Range is reflected in the glassy waters of the Snake River at Schwabacher Landing, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
The Teton Range is reflected in the glassy waters of the Snake River at Schwabacher Landing.
Location: Schwabacher Landing, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 12984  
Bison herd grazes below the Teton Range, Bison bison, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Bison herd grazes below the Teton Range.
Species: American bison, Bison bison
Location: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13004  
A rainbow appears in the mist of the Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River.  At 308 feet, the Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River is the tallest fall in the park.  This view is from the famous and popular Artist Point on the south side of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.  When conditions are perfect in midsummer, a morning rainbow briefly appears in the falls, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
A rainbow appears in the mist of the Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River. At 308 feet, the Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River is the tallest fall in the park. This view is from the famous and popular Artist Point on the south side of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. When conditions are perfect in midsummer, a morning rainbow briefly appears in the falls.
Location: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13330  
The Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River drops 308 feet at the head of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. A long exposure blurs the fast-flowing water.  The canyon is approximately 10,000 years old, 20 miles long, 1000 ft deep, and 2500 ft wide. Its yellow, orange and red-colored walls are due to oxidation of the various iron compounds in the soil, and to a lesser degree, sulfur content, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
The Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River drops 308 feet at the head of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. A long exposure blurs the fast-flowing water. The canyon is approximately 10,000 years old, 20 miles long, 1000 ft deep, and 2500 ft wide. Its yellow, orange and red-colored walls are due to oxidation of the various iron compounds in the soil, and to a lesser degree, sulfur content.
Location: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13339  
Yellowstone Falls from Uncle Tom's Trail.  Lower Yellowstone Falls shows a beautiful rainbow as it cascades 308' in a thundering plunge into the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Yellowstone Falls from Uncle Tom's Trail. Lower Yellowstone Falls shows a beautiful rainbow as it cascades 308' in a thundering plunge into the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River.
Location: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 26942  
Grotto Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Upper Geyser Basin
Grotto Geyser, Yellowstone National Park.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 07204  
Grotto Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Upper Geyser Basin
Grotto Geyser, Yellowstone National Park.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 07206  
Grand Prismatic Spring displays brilliant colors along its edges, created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges. The outer orange and red regions are the coolest water in the spring, where the overflow runs off, Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Grand Prismatic Spring displays brilliant colors along its edges, created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges. The outer orange and red regions are the coolest water in the spring, where the overflow runs off.
Location: Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 07264