Spring photos

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Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground.  Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13421  
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground.  Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13425  
Castle Geyser (during steam phase, not eruption) with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Castle Geyser (during steam phase, not eruption) with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13427  
Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser. Upper Geyser Basin.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13428  
Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser. Upper Geyser Basin.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13429  
Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser. Upper Geyser Basin.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13430  
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground.  Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13437  
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground.  Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13443  
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground.  Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13444  
Belgian Spring, near the Grand Group, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Belgian Spring, near the Grand Group.
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13462  
Beryl Spring is superheated with temperatures above the boiling point, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Beryl Spring is superheated with temperatures above the boiling point.
Location: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13464  
Beryl Spring is superheated with temperatures above the boiling point, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Beryl Spring is superheated with temperatures above the boiling point.
Location: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13465  
Beryl Spring is superheated with temperatures above the boiling point, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Beryl Spring is superheated with temperatures above the boiling point.
Location: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13466  
Beryl Spring is superheated with temperatures above the boiling point, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Beryl Spring is superheated with temperatures above the boiling point.
Location: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13467  
Emerald Spring, with its sulfur-lined sides, displays a deep green color, the result of its clear water (which would otherwise display as blue) and the deep yellow coloration of its sulfur lining, Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Emerald Spring, with its sulfur-lined sides, displays a deep green color, the result of its clear water (which would otherwise display as blue) and the deep yellow coloration of its sulfur lining.
Location: Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13468  
Avoca Spring, Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Avoca Spring.
Location: Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13492  
Black Opal Spring, Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Black Opal Spring.
Location: Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13493  
Wall Pool, Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Wall Pool.
Location: Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13494  
Sapphire Pool, Biscuit Basin.  Sapphire Pool is known as a hot spring but has erupted as a geyser in the past, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Sapphire Pool, Biscuit Basin. Sapphire Pool is known as a hot spring but has erupted as a geyser in the past.
Location: Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13495  
Sapphire Pool, Biscuit Basin.  Sapphire Pool is known as a hot spring but has erupted as a geyser in the past, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Sapphire Pool, Biscuit Basin. Sapphire Pool is known as a hot spring but has erupted as a geyser in the past.
Location: Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13496  
Sapphire Pool, Biscuit Basin.  Sapphire Pool is known as a hot spring but has erupted as a geyser in the past, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Sapphire Pool, Biscuit Basin. Sapphire Pool is known as a hot spring but has erupted as a geyser in the past.
Location: Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13497  
Shell Spring (Shell Geyser) erupts almost continuously.   The geysers opening resembles the two halves of a bivalve seashell, hence its name.  Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Shell Spring (Shell Geyser) erupts almost continuously. The geysers opening resembles the two halves of a bivalve seashell, hence its name. Biscuit Basin.
Location: Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13498  
Shell Spring (Shell Geyser) erupts almost continuously.   The geysers opening resembles the two halves of a bivalve seashell, hence its name.  Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Shell Spring (Shell Geyser) erupts almost continuously. The geysers opening resembles the two halves of a bivalve seashell, hence its name. Biscuit Basin.
Location: Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13499  
Emerald Pool, Black Sand Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Emerald Pool.
Location: Black Sand Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13507  
A visitor photographs Emerald Pool, Black Sand Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
A visitor photographs Emerald Pool.
Location: Black Sand Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13508  
Emerald Pool, Black Sand Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Emerald Pool.
Location: Black Sand Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13509  
Green Spring, Black Sand Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Green Spring.
Location: Black Sand Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13512  
Silex Spring gets its name from the silica which is prevalent in the surrounding volcanic rocks and which is dissolved by the superheated water of Silex Spring.  Silex is latin for silica.  Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Silex Spring gets its name from the silica which is prevalent in the surrounding volcanic rocks and which is dissolved by the superheated water of Silex Spring. Silex is latin for silica. Lower Geyser Basin.
Location: Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13524  
Silex Spring gets its name from the silica which is prevalent in the surrounding volcanic rocks and which is dissolved by the superheated water of Silex Spring.  Silex is latin for silica.  Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Silex Spring gets its name from the silica which is prevalent in the surrounding volcanic rocks and which is dissolved by the superheated water of Silex Spring. Silex is latin for silica. Lower Geyser Basin.
Location: Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13525  
Firehole Spring bubbles and splashes continuously as superheated steam rises through the pool.  Firehole Spring is located along Firehole Lake Drive, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Firehole Spring bubbles and splashes continuously as superheated steam rises through the pool. Firehole Spring is located along Firehole Lake Drive.
Location: Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 13536