Spring photos


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Sapphire Pool, Biscuit Basin.  Sapphire Pool is known as a hot spring but has erupted as a geyser in the past, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Shell Spring (Shell Geyser) erupts almost continuously.   The geysers opening resembles the two halves of a bivalve seashell, hence its name.  Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Shell Spring (Shell Geyser) erupts almost continuously.   The geysers opening resembles the two halves of a bivalve seashell, hence its name.  Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Emerald Pool, Black Sand Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming A visitor photographs Emerald Pool, Black Sand Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Emerald Pool, Black Sand Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Green Spring, Black Sand Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Silex Spring gets its name from the silica which is prevalent in the surrounding volcanic rocks and which is dissolved by the superheated water of Silex Spring.  Silex is latin for silica.  Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Silex Spring gets its name from the silica which is prevalent in the surrounding volcanic rocks and which is dissolved by the superheated water of Silex Spring.  Silex is latin for silica.  Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Firehole Spring bubbles and splashes continuously as superheated steam rises through the pool.  Firehole Spring is located along Firehole Lake Drive, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Firehole Spring bubbles and splashes continuously as superheated steam rises through the pool.  Firehole Spring is located along Firehole Lake Drive, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Firehole Spring bubbles and splashes continuously as superheated steam rises through the pool.  Firehole Spring is located along Firehole Lake Drive, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Lemon Spring along Firehole Lake Drive, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring (left) and Excelsior Geyser (right).  Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring (left) and Excelsior Geyser (right).  Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays a stunning rainbow of colors created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The blue water in the center is too hot to support any bacterial life, while the outer orange rings are the coolest water.  Grand Prismatic Spring is the largest spring in the United States and the third-largest in the world.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays brilliant colors along its edges, created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The outer orange and red regions are the coolest water in the spring, where the overflow runs off.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays brilliant colors along its edges, created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The outer orange and red regions are the coolest water in the spring, where the overflow runs off.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays brilliant colors along its edges, created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The outer orange and red regions are the coolest water in the spring, where the overflow runs off.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays brilliant colors along its edges, created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges.  The outer orange and red regions are the coolest water in the spring, where the overflow runs off.  Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming New Blue Spring steams in the cold morning air with Mammoth Hot Springs Inn in the distance, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming New Blue Spring steams in the cold morning air with Mammoth Hot Springs Inn in the distance, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming New Blue Spring steams in the cold morning air.  Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Orange Spring Mound.  Many years of mineral deposition has built up Orange Spring Mound, part of the Mammoth Hot Springs complex, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Orange Spring Mound.  Many years of mineral deposition has built up Orange Spring Mound, part of the Mammoth Hot Springs complex, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Orange Spring Mound.  Many years of mineral deposition has built up Orange Spring Mound, part of the Mammoth Hot Springs complex, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Canary Spring, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Travertine terraces below Canary Spring with dead trees permanently entombed in the hardened terraces, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Canary Spring, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Travertine terraces below Canary Spring with dead trees permanently entombed in the hardened terraces, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Canary Spring, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Canary Spring, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming New Blue Spring and its travertine terraces, part of the Mammoth Hot Springs complex, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming New Blue Spring and its travertine terraces, part of the Mammoth Hot Springs complex, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming New Blue Spring and its travertine terraces, part of the Mammoth Hot Springs complex, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming New Blue Spring and its travertine terraces, part of the Mammoth Hot Springs complex, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming New Blue Spring and its travertine terraces, part of the Mammoth Hot Springs complex, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming New Blue Spring and its travertine terraces, part of the Mammoth Hot Springs complex, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming New Blue Spring and its travertine terraces, part of the Mammoth Hot Springs complex, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming   more ...

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Updated: January 19, 2021