Monthly Archives

April 2006

Biological Sciences Cover

Uncategorized

Here’s another “scientific journal” cover, I’ve had a few of these in the last three years. My photograph of schooling jacks in the Sea of Cortez appeared on the cover of the January 2006 issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society: Biological Sciences to accompany The principles of collective animal behavior (Sumpter):

Schooling fish, circling jacks, Las Animas, Sea of Cortez, Baja California, Caranx sexfasciatus

Schooling fish, circling jacks, Las Animas, Sea of Cortez, Baja California.
Image ID: 00249
Species: Bigeye jack, Caranx sexfasciatus

Baja California to the Bering Sea Cover

Uncategorized

My photograph of a schooling jacks in the Sea of Cortez appeared on the cover of Baja California to the Bering Sea, a report on marine priority conservation areas issued by the Commission for Environmental Cooperation of North America and the Marine Conservation Biology Institute (Morgan, Maxwell, Tsao, Wilkinson and Etnoyer):

Schooling fish, circling jacks, Las Animas, Sea of Cortez, Baja California, Caranx sexfasciatus

Schooling fish, circling jacks, Las Animas, Sea of Cortez, Baja California.
Image ID: 00249
Species: Bigeye jack, Caranx sexfasciatus

All Animals Cover

Uncategorized

My photograph of a neonate gray whale calf underwater near the Monterey Peninsula appeared on the Summer 2002 cover of the All Animals magazine, the official publication of the Humane Society of the United States:

A neonate gray whale calf, born just hours before, still exhbiting embryonic folds in the skin along its side.  This baby gray whale was born in the cold waters of Big Sur, far to the north of the Mexican lagoons of Baja California where most gray whale births take place, Eschrichtius robustus, Monterey

A neonate gray whale calf, born just hours before, still exhbiting embryonic folds in the skin along its side. This baby gray whale was born in the cold waters of Big Sur, far to the north of the Mexican lagoons of Baja California where most gray whale births take place.
Image ID: 01135
Species: Gray whale, Eschrichtius robustus
Location: Monterey, California, USA

Ecology Letters Cover

Uncategorized

In addition to the cover of Nature a few years ago, I’ve had interest from other scientific and peer-reviewed journals recently. My photograph of a scalloped hammerhead shark appeared on the October 2005 cover of Ecology Letters, to accompany Direct and indirect fishery effects on small coastal elasmobranchs in the northern Gulf of Mexico (Shepherd and Myers):

Scalloped hammerhead shark swims underwater at Cocos Island.  The hammerheads eyes and other sensor organs are placed far apart on its wide head to give the shark greater ability to sense the location of prey, Sphyrna lewini

Scalloped hammerhead shark swims underwater at Cocos Island. The hammerheads eyes and other sensor organs are placed far apart on its wide head to give the shark greater ability to sense the location of prey.
Image ID: 03192
Species: Scalloped hammerhead shark, Sphyrna lewini
Location: Cocos Island, Costa Rica

Photo of a Wood Duck, Aix Sponsa

Photo of the Day

The wood duck (Aix sponsa) inhabits lakes, swamps and streams throughout much of North America. Curiously, it is one of just a few duck species in North America that nests in trees. The male wood duck has a bright plumage pattern including rich green, white, brown and red colors, while the female wood duck is a much less eyecatching dull brown. Wood ducks successfully use nest boxes, if they are available. Wood ducks nest in trees adjacent to or overhanging water. When the ducklings hatch the mother wood duck will call to them, encouraging them to jump from the nest to the ground — falls of nearly 300′ are described with no injury to the featherweight, fluffy ducklings. The wood duck is a game bird and second only to the mallard in the numbers that are shot each year.

Wood duck, male, Aix sponsa, Santee Lakes

Wood duck, male.
Image ID: 15694
Species: Wood duck, Aix sponsa
Location: Santee Lakes, California, USA

Wood duck, male, Aix sponsa, Santee Lakes

Wood duck, male.
Image ID: 15691
Species: Wood duck, Aix sponsa
Location: Santee Lakes, California, USA

Wood duck, male, Aix sponsa, Santee Lakes

Wood duck, male.
Image ID: 15693
Species: Wood duck, Aix sponsa
Location: Santee Lakes, California, USA

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Photos of Bridalveil Falls, Yosemite National Park

California, National Parks, Sierra Nevada, Yosemite

Bridalveil Falls is a classic example of a “hanging valley”. Two million years ago it was a stream flowing through a canyon that intersected Yosemite Valley. Over time glaciers carved away the intersection, leaving Bridalveil’s canyon “hanging” above the valley and turning the stream into falls that plunge 620 feet (200m). Wind often blows the falls back and forth, producing a wide swath of mist that cools visitors who take the short hike to the base of the falls. Native indians referred to Bridalveil Falls as Pohono (“blowing wind”) and considered it to be a superstitious place. Bridalveil Fall, with a large absorbant watershed, flows year round. However, spring is the time to visit Yosemite National Park if you are interested in waterfalls. We make at least one visit to Yosemite Valley each spring, usually in May or early June, to see the park’s falls at their peak flow and to enjoy crisp cool mornings, verdant forests, blooming dogwood trees, a hike up the Mist Trail and Sunday brunch at the Ahwahnee. Bridalveil Falls is the first major water fall visitors see when entering Yosemite Valley, first seen we one emerges from the tunnel entrance to the west end of the valley, as it forms one side of the Gates of the Valley, then a short drive later it is observed from the floor of Yosemite Valley. Bridalveil Falls is a short, level walk from the parking lot to the base of the falls, through shady trees. When the falls are pumping the forest around the base of the falls is dripping wet and side streams form to pull the overflow from the falls down to the Merced River a few hundred yards away. In late afternoon a rainbow often forms in the spray of Bridalveil Falls, rising as the sun sinks.

Bridalveil Falls at sunset, with clouds and blue sky in the background.  Bridalveil Falls in Yosemite drops 620 feet (188 m) from a hanging valley to the floor of Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park, California

Bridalveil Falls at sunset, with clouds and blue sky in the background. Bridalveil Falls in Yosemite drops 620 feet (188 m) from a hanging valley to the floor of Yosemite Valley.
Image ID: 12646
Location: Bridalveil Falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

Bridalveil Falls with a rainbow forming in its spray, dropping 620 into Yosemite Valley, displaying peak water flow in spring months from deep snowpack and warm weather melt.  Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park, California

Bridalveil Falls with a rainbow forming in its spray, dropping 620 into Yosemite Valley, displaying peak water flow in spring months from deep snowpack and warm weather melt. Yosemite Valley.
Image ID: 16160
Location: Bridalveil Falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

Bridalveil Falls plummets 620 feet (200m).  Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park, California

Bridalveil Falls plummets 620 feet (200m). Yosemite Valley.
Image ID: 16077
Location: Bridalveil Falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

Bridalveil Falls plummets 620 feet (200m).  Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park, California

Bridalveil Falls plummets 620 feet (200m). Yosemite Valley.
Image ID: 16080
Location: Bridalveil Falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

See some other waterfalls in Yosemite Valley: Yosemite Falls, Vernal Falls and Horsetail Falls.

Keywords: Bridalveil Falls, waterfall, Yosemite National Park, Yosemite Valley, California, photo, picture, image, pho