Monthly Archives

February 2013

Art Seller, La Rive Gauche, Paris, France

Paris

Art Seller along La Rive Gauche, the Left Bank, Paris.

La Rive Gauche, the Left Bank, is the southern bank of the river Seine in Paris, France. Here the river flows roughly westward, cutting the city in two: looking downstream, the southern bank is to the left, and the northern bank (or Rive Droite) is to the right. Art and book sellers have small booths along the walls above the Seine and everyone enjoys an afternoon stroll to people watch and inspect the sellers’ wares. A peek of Notre Dame Cathedral can be seen behind the art-seller’s booth. Cheers and thanks for looking!

Art Seller along La Rive Gauche, the Left Bank, Paris. La Rive Gauch, the Left Bank, is the southern bank of the river Seine in Paris. Here the river flows roughly westward, cutting the city in two: looking downstream, the southern bank is to the left, and the northern bank (or Rive Droite) is to the right

Art Seller along La Rive Gauche, the Left Bank, Paris. La Rive Gauch, the Left Bank, is the southern bank of the river Seine in Paris. Here the river flows roughly westward, cutting the city in two: looking downstream, the southern bank is to the left, and the northern bank (or Rive Droite) is to the right.
Image ID: 28146
Location: La Rive Gauche, Paris, France

See more Travel photos of Paris!

Les Invalides, Paris, France

Paris

Les Invalides, officially known as L’Hotel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building’s original purpose. Here are a few photos of Hotel National des Invalides, Paris, France. Cheers and thanks for looking!

Tomb of Napolean Bonaparte in Les Invalides. Les Invalides, officially known as L'Hotel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building's original purpose, Hotel National des Invalides

Tomb of Napolean Bonaparte in Les Invalides. Les Invalides, officially known as L’Hotel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building’s original purpose.
Image ID: 28122
Location: Hotel National des Invalides, Paris, France

Les Invalides, officially known as L'Hotel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building's original purpose, Hotel National des Invalides

Les Invalides, officially known as L’Hotel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building’s original purpose.
Image ID: 28161
Location: Hotel National des Invalides, Paris, France

Les Invalides, officially known as L'Hotel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building's original purpose, Hotel National des Invalides

Les Invalides, officially known as L’Hotel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building’s original purpose.
Image ID: 28121
Location: Hotel National des Invalides, Paris, France

Les Invalides, officially known as L'Hotel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building's original purpose, Hotel National des Invalides

Les Invalides, officially known as L’Hotel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building’s original purpose.
Image ID: 28162
Location: Hotel National des Invalides, Paris, France

Les Invalides, officially known as L'Hotel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building's original purpose, Hotel National des Invalides

Les Invalides, officially known as L’Hotel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building’s original purpose.
Image ID: 28163
Location: Hotel National des Invalides, Paris, France

Les Invalides, officially known as L'Hotel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building's original purpose, Hotel National des Invalides

Les Invalides, officially known as L’Hotel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building’s original purpose.
Image ID: 28164
Location: Hotel National des Invalides, Paris, France

See more Travel photos of Paris!

Tides of Time Cover

Uncategorized

“Times of Time” was a coffee table-type book, a collaborative product of the Jaeger-LeCoutre Watch Company, the United Nations, the World Heritage Centre and the International Herald Tribune, focusing on ocean issues. My photo of a newborn gray whale calf, photographed 17 years ago offshore of Point Lobos / Big Sur with photographer pals Ken Howard, Skip Stubbs and Kevin McDonnell, was selected for the cover. Note the embryonic folds seen along the whales body, a result of it being curled up in the womb, and a bit of the umbilicus — this calf was very very young, perhaps just hours old. Cheers, and thanks for looking!

Coronado Aerial Photos

Aerial Photography, San Diego

Aerial photographs of Coronado, California, including Coronado Island, the Hotel del Coronado, and the San Diego Coronado Bay Bridge.

These five Coronado Aerial Photographs are just a selection. If you like them, please be sure to see also my full collection of Coronado Aerial Photos and a gallery of San Diego Aerial Photos.

Hotel del Coronado, known affectionately as the Hotel Del.  It was once the largest hotel in the world, and is one of the few remaining wooden Victorian beach resorts.  It sits on the beach on Coronado Island, seen here with downtown San Diego in the distance.  It is widely considered to be one of Americas most beautiful and classic hotels. Built in 1888, it was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1977

Hotel del Coronado, known affectionately as the Hotel Del. It was once the largest hotel in the world, and is one of the few remaining wooden Victorian beach resorts. It sits on the beach on Coronado Island, seen here with downtown San Diego in the distance. It is widely considered to be one of Americas most beautiful and classic hotels. Built in 1888, it was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1977.
Image ID: 22287
Location: San Diego, California, USA

San Diego Coronado Bridge, known locally as the Coronado Bridge, links San Diego with Coronado, California.  The bridge was completed in 1969 and was a toll bridge until 2002.  It is 2.1 miles long and reaches a height of 200 feet above San Diego Bay.  Coronado Island is to the left, and downtown San Diego is to the right in this view looking north

San Diego Coronado Bridge, known locally as the Coronado Bridge, links San Diego with Coronado, California. The bridge was completed in 1969 and was a toll bridge until 2002. It is 2.1 miles long and reaches a height of 200 feet above San Diego Bay. Coronado Island is to the left, and downtown San Diego is to the right in this view looking north.
Image ID: 22288
Location: San Diego, California, USA

Coronado Shores, a group of 10 condominium buildings south of the Hotel Del, on the water on Coronado Island, San Diego, California

Coronado Shores, a group of 10 condominium buildings south of the Hotel Del, on the water on Coronado Island.
Image ID: 22297
Location: San Diego, California, USA

Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, situated on the Silver Strand between San Diego Bay and the Pacific Ocean, is the West Coast focal point for special and expeditionary warfare training and operations.  The famous "swastika building" is seen on the southern (left) side of the base

Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, situated on the Silver Strand between San Diego Bay and the Pacific Ocean, is the West Coast focal point for special and expeditionary warfare training and operations. The famous “swastika building” is seen on the southern (left) side of the base.
Image ID: 22298
Location: San Diego, California, USA

Sunset over Coronado Island and Point Loma, San Diego, California

Sunset over Coronado Island and Point Loma.
Image ID: 22335
Location: San Diego, California, USA

River Seine, Full Moon and Eiffel Tower at Night, Paris

Icons, Paris

River Seine, Full Moon and Eiffel Tower at Night, Paris

We walked along the Right Bank of the Seine from our small hotel on Ile Saint Louis to the Trocadero. For about 5 minutes at the top of the hour the Eiffel Tower lit up with a nice display of lights, so we stopped and photographed it with some river tour boats passing in front. The moon was near full and just happened to be in the right place! If you like this one, please see more Paris photos. Cheers and thanks for looking.

River Seine, Full Moon and Eiffel Tower at night, Paris. La Tour Eiffel. The Eiffel Tower is an iron lattice tower located on the Champ de Mars in Paris, named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, who designed the tower in 1889 as the entrance arch to the 1889 World's Fair. The Eiffel tower is the tallest structure in Paris and the most-visited paid monument in the world

River Seine, Full Moon and Eiffel Tower at night, Paris. La Tour Eiffel. The Eiffel Tower is an iron lattice tower located on the Champ de Mars in Paris, named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, who designed the tower in 1889 as the entrance arch to the 1889 World’s Fair. The Eiffel tower is the tallest structure in Paris and the most-visited paid monument in the world
Image ID: 28203
Location: Tour Eiffel, Paris, France

Choosing a Projection for Panoramic Photos

Panoramas, Wisdom

Some of my most profitable images are landscape panoramic photos, selected for large reproduction in office lobbies, museums or sometimes private homes. With the current generation of extremely sharp lenses and very high resolution sensors, and advances in photo processing software and hardware, it is straightforward to make enormous, high quality, and visually flawless panoramas from individual images. One decision which can profoundly affect the outcome of the panorama is the chosen projection mode.

After trips to Zion, Crater Lake, Death Valley, and Yosemite National Parks, during which one of my goals was to create very large, highly detailed panoramas with the Nikon D800 and D800e cameras, I have been assembling a number of panoramas and deciding which ones to keep and present for sale and licensing. I use a variety of software to create the final panoramas from individual images, including Photoshop, Panorama Factory, PTGui and most recently, AutoPano Pro 3.0. In some cases, the choice of a projection seems to make little difference. But in compositions that involve very wide angles, or include a lot of sky (such as Milky Way panoramic photos), the projection mode can make a huge difference, especially with elements of the composition that are at or near the edges of the final image. To illustrate this, here are 7 different projections of the same panorama, formed from six individual frames shot at Crater Lake using a Canon 5D Mark III and 15mm full frame fisheye lens. I have a few further remarks about my choice(s) of stitching software at the end of the post.

All of these panoramas are made in fully automatic mode in AutoPano Pro, with no adjustments other than simple contrast, saturation and curve in Lightroom before passing the component images to AutoPano Pro. The results are uncropped to emphasize the distortion (or lack thereof) inherent in the different projections.

Cylindrical

Spherical

Hammer

Mercator

Panini

Stereo

Mirror Ball

Note there is no ghosting in these images — I am really impressed with AutoPano Pro for this reason and it is quickly becoming my preferred panorama software. Also, AutoPano Pro seems to make better use of the computer’s resources when stitching enormous (250 MB to 1.5 GB) panoramas. Photoshop seems to often bring the computer to its knees and it painfully slow in many cases. Panorama Factory simply “runs out of memory” in many situations, and does not seem to take advantage of the 32GB of memory I have installed on my iMac. PTGUI is great for allowing me to precisely choose the center of the image which a given projection will be based, but I find that often PTGui’s automated selection of stitching points includes errors that lead to ghosting or other artifacts. AutoPano Pro, however, processes panoramas quickly and without bogging down my computer overly much (I am still able to multitask while AutoPano Pro is rendering the final images). Furthermore, AutoPano Pro has excellent automatic determination of stitch points (the pairs of points needed to help the stitching algorithm decide how to align two overlapping images); I rarely have to resort to placing manual stitch points with AutoPano Pro. Lastly, I shoot many of my daylight panoramas handheld, which means there is some ghosting and parallax error in foreground objects. Photoshop does a good job resolving these problems, but so does AutoPano Pro and so much more quickly and with less compute time. There you go, I think you can guess what my favorite stitching software is at the moment.

The Raft of the Medusa, Le Radeau de la Meduse, Musee du Louvre, Paris

Paris

There were a handful of paintings in the Louvre that really caught my eye, made me stop and ponder them for a while. I am not an art afficionado and rarely spend more than a few seconds considering a single piece of art. Yet something about these works stopped me in my tracks. Perhaps it was the sheer emotion and sense of tragedy, and that passing of ages gone by. I’m not sure. But that is the point of art, to stop the viewer and cause him to think, appreciate, wonder and be moved. Cheers and thanks for looking.

The Raft of the Medusa, Le Radeau de la Meduse, oil painting by French Romantic painter Theodore Gericault, 1819. Musee du Louvre, Paris, France

The Raft of the Medusa, Le Radeau de la Meduse, oil painting by French Romantic painter Theodore Gericault, 1819. Musee du Louvre.
Image ID: 28107
Location: Musee du Louvre, Paris, France

A couple others that I really enjoyed:

Les Noces de Cana, The Wedding at Cana, by Paolo Veronese. Musee du Louvre, Paris, France

Les Noces de Cana, The Wedding at Cana, by Paolo Veronese. Musee du Louvre.
Image ID: 28105
Location: Musee du Louvre, Paris, France

Death of Sardanapalus, La Mort de Sardanapale, oil painting on canvas, 1827 by Eugene Delacroix. Musee du Louvre, Paris, France

Death of Sardanapalus, La Mort de Sardanapale, oil painting on canvas, 1827 by Eugene Delacroix. Musee du Louvre.
Image ID: 28221
Location: Musee du Louvre, Paris, France

For more spectacular photos of Paris, hmm, well, see: Spectacular Photos of Paris!

Leaving the Louvre

Paris

Leaving La Musee du Louvre, Paris, France. See more photos of Paris!

As the evening visiting hours ended, we sadly departed the incredible Italian painting galleries and headed for the exit. Tracy walks down one of the long, masterpiece-strewn corridors on our way out.

Leaving the Louvre Museum, evening, Paris, Musee du Louvre

Leaving the Louvre Museum, evening, Paris.
Image ID: 28111
Location: Musee du Louvre, Paris, France