Category

Landscape

Panorama of the Wave, North Coyote Buttes

Arizona, Landscape, Panoramas, The Wave

The Wave, that much-photographed geological oddity on the border between Arizona and Utah. I spent some time there on my last visit trying to shoot appealing panoramas, but was not entirely satisfied, it is a tough landscape to capture that way. This was one of panorama photos I was happy with:

Panorama of the Wave.  The Wave is a sweeping, dramatic display of eroded sandstone, forged by eons of water and wind erosion, laying bare striations formed from compacted sand dunes over millenia.  This panoramic picture is formed from thirteen individual photographs, North Coyote Buttes, Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness, Arizona

Panorama of the Wave. The Wave is a sweeping, dramatic display of eroded sandstone, forged by eons of water and wind erosion, laying bare striations formed from compacted sand dunes over millenia. This panoramic picture is formed from thirteen individual photographs.
Image ID: 20700
Location: North Coyote Buttes, Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness, Arizona, USA

We’ve got permits for March and April already, and hope to get out there again this spring.

Photo of Ponytail Falls, Columbia River Gorge

Landscape, Oregon, Photo of the Day

My daughter and I took a hike in the Columbia River Gorge one morning to see three waterfalls. The four-mile roundtrip trail we walked was entirely within a cool, shady forest overlooking the Columbia River. The most striking of the falls was Ponytail Falls, also known as Upper Horsetail Falls as it lies on Horsetail Creek above, obviously, lower Horsetail Falls. Horsetail Creek races through a slot before dropping over a rock overhang into a shallow pool. Hikers can walk behind the falls or even step down into some of the spray to cool off. Most excellent.

Ponytail Falls, where Horsetail Creeks drops 100 feet over an overhang below which hikers can walk, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon

Ponytail Falls, where Horsetail Creeks drops 100 feet over an overhang below which hikers can walk.
Image ID: 19337
Location: Ponytail Falls, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon, USA

Ponytail Falls, where Horsetail Creeks drops 100 feet over an overhang below which hikers can walk, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon

Ponytail Falls, where Horsetail Creeks drops 100 feet over an overhang below which hikers can walk.
Image ID: 19340
Location: Ponytail Falls, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon, USA

Derelict Pier Pilings in Astoria

Landscape, Oregon, Photo of the Day

Astoria, Oregon and the communities surrounding it, at the mouth of the Columbia River, have a long maritime history (since at least the time of Lewis and Clark). It seems like there are thousands of derelict, abandoned and decaying piers all over the place.

Derelict pilings, remnants of long abandoned piers, Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon

Derelict pilings, remnants of long abandoned piers.
Image ID: 19383
Location: Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon, USA

Derelict pilings, remnants of long abandoned piers, Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon

Derelict pilings, remnants of long abandoned piers.
Image ID: 19388
Location: Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon, USA

Columbia River Viewed From Vista House

Landscape, Oregon, Panoramas

Vista House was built in 1918 as a memorial to Oregon pioneers and as a comfort station for those traveling on the Historic Columbia River Highway. The octagonal stone structure towers 733 feet above the Columbia River and provides a spectacular view. Click it to see it larger, or see more panorama photos in our collection.

Panoramic view of the Columbia River as it flows through Columbia River Gorge Scenic Area, looking east from the Vista House overlook on the southern Oregon side of the river, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

Panoramic view of the Columbia River as it flows through Columbia River Gorge Scenic Area, looking east from the Vista House overlook on the southern Oregon side of the river.
Image ID: 19374
Location: Columbia River, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon, USA

Photo of North Head Lighthouse, Washington

Landscape, Panoramas, Washington

While in Astoria recently, we took a little drive across to the Washington side of the Columbia River to see North Head Lighthouse. It was overcast, sort of pre-storm looking, perfect weather for walking around a blustery promontory high above the coast and checking out an old lighthouse. Below is a panorama of the bluffs beside the North Head Lighthouse, spanning about 180 degrees up and down the coast. Can you see my daughter next to the lens inside the top room of the lighthouse? Click it to see a larger version, or see more panorama photos in our collection.

The North Head Lighthouse was built in 1896. 69 steps lead to the lantern room, which is 65 feet from the ground and 194 feet above sea level. The first-order Fresnel lens, which came from Cape Disappointment, was lit for the first time on May 16, 1898

The North Head Lighthouse was built in 1896. 69 steps lead to the lantern room, which is 65 feet from the ground and 194 feet above sea level. The first-order Fresnel lens, which came from Cape Disappointment, was lit for the first time on May 16, 1898.
Image ID: 19390
Location: Washington, USA

Mount St. Helens Panoramic Photo

Landscape, Panoramas, Washington

From the 2005 archives: I left Seattle in the late afternoon and began my speed run south, home to Carlsbad. I planned to stop at three spots: Mount St. Helens, Crater Lake and Oakland. I reached the Johnston Ridge viewpoint of Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument (say that three times quickly) before sunset and had the entire place to myself. It was eerie, I was wondering if I had missed an eruption warning or something. This is a panoramic photo, composed of 4 separate images stitched (on the computer) into a single picture.

Panorama of Mount St. Helens, viewed from Johnston Ridge, Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument

Panorama of Mount St. Helens, viewed from Johnston Ridge.
Image ID: 19118
Location: Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, Washington, USA

Click the image to see it larger.

Tenaya Lake Panoramic Photo

California, Landscape, National Parks, Panoramas, Sierra Nevada, Yosemite

In late summer a few years ago we took the kids to spend a few nights in Tuolumne Meadows and then drive over Tioga Pass to see Mono Lake. We stopped at Lake Tenaya for a swim and a picnic lunch on the way to the meadows. This is a panoramic image, composed of 8 separate photographs stitched (on the computer) into a single picture.

Panorama of Tenaya Lake, in Yosemite's high country, Yosemite National Park, California

Panorama of Tenaya Lake, in Yosemite’s high country.
Image ID: 19121
Location: Tenaya Lake, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

Click the image to see it larger.

Crater Lake Panoramic Photograph

Crater Lake, Landscape, Oregon, Panoramas

I had always wanted to see Crater Lake and finally got a chance when I was returning to southern California from Washington. I reached the north rim of Crater Lake just as the sun was rising. There was no one else around, even on the drive through the dark leading into Crater Lake National Park I had seen nobody else that morning. The view was stunning, sublime and I felt like I had the place entirely to myself, so naturally I took a self portrait. This panorama is composed of four separate photographs stitched into a long narrow strip.

Self portrait at sunrise, panorama of Crater Lake.  Crater Lake is the six-mile wide lake inside the collapsed caldera of volcanic Mount Mazama. Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States and the seventh-deepest in the world. Its maximum recorded depth is 1996 feet (608m). It lies at an altitude of 6178 feet (1880m), Crater Lake National Park

Self portrait at sunrise, panorama of Crater Lake. Crater Lake is the six-mile wide lake inside the collapsed caldera of volcanic Mount Mazama. Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States and the seventh-deepest in the world. Its maximum recorded depth is 1996 feet (608m). It lies at an altitude of 6178 feet (1880m).
Image ID: 19130
Location: Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, USA

Click the image to see it large

Photo of Nevada Falls, Yosemite National Park

California, Landscape, National Parks, Sierra Nevada, Yosemite

Nevada Falls is one of Yosemite’s most spectacular waterfalls but is only reached with some effort. A 3.5 mile hike (one-way) up the Mist Trail, which includes a good soaking while passing by Vernal Falls along the way, is required to reach the summit of Nevada Falls, including 1900′ of vertical ascent. Nevada Falls lies, along with Vernal Falls, in the joints of narrow Little Yosemite Valley, faults in the valley that form angles and walls as the glacier-formed valley descends from Yosemite’s backcountry down to the main valley floor. It is at the joints that Nevada and Vernal falls occur, both dropping over sheer granite walls into boulder-strewn riverbeds below. Above Nevada Falls the Merced River flows placidly, green and glassy through pine forests. In the last several hundred yards before the brink, the river slopes downward a bit and increases in speed, enough that when it reaches the brink it shoots out dramatically and thunders 600′ down to the huge boulders before racing through forests to Vernal Falls 1.5 miles downstream. The hike to Nevada Falls begins at the summit of Vernal Falls, a natural resting point for the hiker who has just finished the soaking wet, thigh-burner steps alongside Vernal and needs a breather to recover and dry off in the sun. Leaving Vernal behind, one hikes through brief switchbacks open to the sun (not hot yet, since you are still wet) then through trees that obscure Nevada Falls for a while. After a half-mile or so the trees begin to open up, yielding stunning views of Nevada ahead. The trail then moves to a series of switchbacks among granite boulders that pass alongside Nevada Falls, near enough that one really appreciates the power manifest in the enormous amounts of water barreling over the cliff. Finally the summit is achieved, offering broad views of Little Yosemite Valley below all the across to Glacier Point. A bridge over the Merced River is placed just before the Merced plunges over the falls, and wide granite aprons on either side of the river make for great picnic spots. For the descent to Vernal Falls and the valley, its best to take the alternate route back down via the John Muir trail as it has superb views of Nevada Falls with Half Dome and Liberty Cap rising above it.

Nevada Falls marks where the Merced River plummets almost 600 through a joint in the Little Yosemite Valley, shooting out from a sheer granite cliff and then down to a boulder pile far below, Yosemite National Park, California

Nevada Falls marks where the Merced River plummets almost 600 through a joint in the Little Yosemite Valley, shooting out from a sheer granite cliff and then down to a boulder pile far below.
Image ID: 16114
Location: Nevada Falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

Nevada Falls, with Liberty Cap (center) and Half Dome (left). Nevada Falls marks where the Merced River plummets almost 600 through a joint in the Little Yosemite Valley, shooting out from a sheer granite cliff and then down to a boulder pile far below, Yosemite National Park, California

Nevada Falls, with Liberty Cap (center) and Half Dome (left). Nevada Falls marks where the Merced River plummets almost 600 through a joint in the Little Yosemite Valley, shooting out from a sheer granite cliff and then down to a boulder pile far below.
Image ID: 16115
Location: Nevada Falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

Nevada Falls marks where the Merced River plummets almost 600 through a joint in the Little Yosemite Valley, shooting out from a sheer granite cliff and then down to a boulder pile far below, Yosemite National Park, California

Nevada Falls marks where the Merced River plummets almost 600 through a joint in the Little Yosemite Valley, shooting out from a sheer granite cliff and then down to a boulder pile far below.
Image ID: 16116
Location: Nevada Falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

Keywords: Nevada Falls, waterfall, Yosemite National Park<

Bridalveil Falls Rainbow

California, Landscape, National Parks, Sierra Nevada, Yosemite

During spring months with heavy water flow, it is easy to see a rainbow in Bridalveil Falls: just visit the falls a short while before sunset and watch as the colors climb up the plummeting water as the sun sinks behind you.

Bridalveil Falls with a rainbow forming in its spray, dropping 620 into Yosemite Valley, displaying peak water flow in spring months from deep snowpack and warm weather melt.  Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park, California

Bridalveil Falls with a rainbow forming in its spray, dropping 620 into Yosemite Valley, displaying peak water flow in spring months from deep snowpack and warm weather melt. Yosemite Valley.
Image ID: 16160
Location: Bridalveil Falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

Keywords: bridalveil falls, yosemite national park, photo, picture, image, waterfall, photograph.