Category

Abstract

Ghost Cormorant

Abstract, Birds

A cormorant speeds home to its nest in the La Jolla seacliffs, flying just above the waves. Shot long before sunrise, this image is blurred from the long time the shutter was open.

Fluid Carpet, Abstract Photo

Abstract

OK, I admit it, my youngest daughter shot this image. I let her loose with our uber-mikro-digi-kamera one day while we were crashed at a hotel. I set the camera up for long exposures, and this is one of the images she came up with. Kids don’t know any rules when it comes to photography. Most of them don’t even remember film. They just know that it costs nothing to snap an image, so they snap and snap and snap. They don’t care about the junk shots, only about the one image out of the many that has something going on and captures the viewer’s interest. Kids try things with a camera that we (insert: real photographers, old people, you, me, GenXers, boomers, the ancients) might never think of. Sarah held the camera just a few inches above the carpet as she walked down the hallway to get this smeared image. I liked her shot so much I stole her idea and got a keeper of my own. Today’s abstract photo, #13 of 15.

Patterns in carpet blurred into abstract by time exposure

Patterns in carpet blurred into abstract by time exposure.
Image ID: 20570

Layers, Abstract Photo

Abstract, La Jolla

Another abstract cloud photo. I like using a medium telephoto lens to isolate landscape elements, and patterns in clouds are no exception. This was probably shot with a 70-200 on Velvia film, vintage. Moments after the green flash, orange skies over La Jolla. Today’s abstract photo, #12 of 15.

Clouds and sunlight, La Jolla, California

Clouds and sunlight.
Image ID: 04818
Location: La Jolla, California, USA

Sunset Booby, Abstract Photo

Abstract, Galapagos Diaries

Our days at Darwin Island in the Galapagos islands have been fantastic. On each of our trips we spent several days, sometimes almost a week, at this usually spectacular, remote and wild place. The diving can be, of course, unsurpassed which is one reason that virtually all visitors to Darwin Island are divers. Too bad, since the place is insanely dense with bird life. Birders would love this place, but I doubt many ever see it since the island has no approved land visits (that I know of). We spend lots of time between dives during the day and while sipping margaritas on the rooftop deck at sunset, watching the hordes of birds come and go. Upon waking each morning one naturally steps out on deck to see how the day is shaping up. Towering columns of birds lit by the sunrise, soaring on the warming updrafts and moving out to sea by the thousands, rise above the sheer sides of the island. The cacophony of bird sounds is impressive. Throughout the day frigatebirds and boobies perform their neverending parts, with boobies diving for food offshore and frigates trying to spook them into disgorging their catch as they fly back to land. This bird, likely either a blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii) or Nazca booby (Sula granti), is blurred as it is seen against the pastel hues of sunset. Today’s abstract photo, #11 of 15.

Booby in flight, motion blur, Darwin Island

Booby in flight, motion blur.
Image ID: 16686
Location: Darwin Island, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

Clouds on Fire, Abstract Photo

Abstract, Hawaii

Resuming the series of abstracts (before it was so rudely interrupted with bird pics): today’s abstract photo is an image of clouds on fire, taken from the lanai of Skip’s seaside surf pad in Napili, looking out over Lanai and Molokai. Wow, did we ever have some epic sunsets in those years we were doing whale research on Maui! #10 of 15:

Clouds and sunlight, Maui

Clouds and sunlight.
Image ID: 05640
Location: Maui, Hawaii, USA

Predawn Flock of Snow Geese, Abstract Photo

Abstract

Last winter I joined friends Skip Stubbs and Ken Howard for a few days of bird photography at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. I would get up early each morning to watch the enormous flocks of snow geese that overnight on the ponds take off in a massive predawn exodus, up up and away to the crane pools or corn fields nearby, where they would spend the day foraging and quacking. Due to the dim light a long exposure was required, rendering the geese as streaks across the background. Today’s abstract photo, #6 of 15:

Snow geese at sunrise.  Thousands of wintering snow geese take to the sky in predawn light in Bosque del Apache's famous "blast off".  The flock can be as large as 20,000 geese or more.  Long time exposure creates blurring among the geese, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico

Snow geese at sunrise. Thousands of wintering snow geese take to the sky in predawn light in Bosque del Apache’s famous “blast off”. The flock can be as large as 20,000 geese or more. Long time exposure creates blurring among the geese.
Image ID: 21799
Species: Snow goose, Chen caerulescens
Location: Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico, USA