Category

Manatee

Propeller Wound on Florida Manatee

Florida, Manatee, Wildlife

Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus) are often struck and injured by boats, in spite of laws intended to slow the passage of boats in areas inhabited by the slow-moving mammals. Manatees tend to rest below the surface, holding their breath, and surface without warning when they need to breathe. A boater who is moving too quickly or not paying attention can easily hit the manatee in such a situation. The result is frequently injury and sometimes death, either by virtue of the immediate trauma or by infection in the deep wound caused by the boat. In these photos, Florida manatees display scars, evidence of injuries from boats and/or boat propellers.

West Indian manatee with scarring/wound from boat propellor, Trichechus manatus, Homosassa River

West Indian manatee with scarring/wound from boat propellor.
Image ID: 03306
Species: West Indian manatee, Trichechus manatus
Location: Homosassa River, Florida, USA

West Indian manatee with scarring/wound from boat propellor, Trichechus manatus, Homosassa River

West Indian manatee with scarring/wound from boat propellor.
Image ID: 03307
Species: West Indian manatee, Trichechus manatus
Location: Homosassa River, Florida, USA

West Indian manatee with scarring/wound from boat propellor, Trichechus manatus, Homosassa River

West Indian manatee with scarring/wound from boat propellor.
Image ID: 03308
Species: West Indian manatee, Trichechus manatus
Location: Homosassa River, Florida, USA

See more boat strike photos, Florida manatee photos and Trichecus manatus photos.

Photo of West Indian Manatee, Crystal River, Florida

Florida, Manatee, Marine Life, Underwater Life

A West Indian manatee, also known as a Florida manatee, at the Three Sisters Springs on the Crystal River, Florida.

A Florida manatee, or West Indian Manatee, swims slowly through the clear waters of Crystal River, Trichechus manatus, Three Sisters Springs

A Florida manatee, or West Indian Manatee, swims slowly through the clear waters of Crystal River.
Image ID: 02696
Species: West Indian manatee, Trichechus manatus
Location: Three Sisters Springs, Crystal River, Florida, USA

I found that the best time to photograph these animals is early in the day, at least before groups of tourists arrive and begin stirring up the water or causing the manatees to leave the area. I would actually arrive before sunrise, when the canal is steaming in the cold dry air. The available light is dim at that time, in fact the trichoidal patterns on the back of the manatee are not from sunlight filtering through the water but from strobe light reflected off the surface of the water back down onto the manatee. Colleague Doug Perrine, one of the top working marine photographers in the world and recent winner of the prestigious Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2004 Competition, offered this most important piece of advice when I was planning a visit to Crystal River to see manatees: time your visit with the passing of a cold front. The reason for this is simple. Florida spring waters flow at a constant temperature of 72 degrees F. Manatees gather in the springs — which is where you want them to be for purposes of observing and photographing them — for warmth and to rest when the surrounding ocean and river waters are too cold for their comfort, such as during a cold spell. Once the cold front has passed and the surrounding waters have warmed again, the manatees will leave the springs to forage for food in the surrounding canals, wetlands and coastal areas.

See more West Indian Manatee photos.

Keywords: manatee photo, West Indian manatee photo, Florida manatee photo, Trichechus manatus photo, Crystal River, Three Sisters spring, underwater photograph, photo of the day, manatee picture, manatee photograph.