Tag

Geysers

Photo of Castle Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

National Parks, Wyoming, Yellowstone

Road Trip: Day 4

Castle Geyser is, after Old Faithful Geyser, perhaps the most-viewed of the large predictable geysers in Yellowstone National Park. Castle Geyser is a short, easy walk from the Old Faithful Inn, and is well predicted with intervals of about 10 hours. Since Castle Geyser stands in a large clearing in the Upper Geyser Basin, its eruptions are easily seen from the entire area. Castle Geyser’s eruption a lengthy water phase — 20 minutes is typical — followed by an additional 40 minutes or so of steam, so when it erupts a crowd has time to gather to admire its tall blow, up to 90′ high. Castle Geyser’s 12′ tall cone suggests that it is 5,000 to 15,000 years old. However, it sits on top of an even older and more massive sinter base formed by an earlier spring. Tortoise Shell Spring lies to one side of Castle Geyser covering the base with a beautiful pearly, orange-yellow color.

Castle Geyser erupts, reaching 60 to 90 feet in height and lasting 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Castle Geyser erupts, reaching 60 to 90 feet in height and lasting 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13417
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Castle Geyser (during steam phase, not eruption) with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Castle Geyser (during steam phase, not eruption) with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13427
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13430
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground.  Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13437
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Keywords: castle geyser, tortoise shell spring, yellowstone national park.

Photo of Grand Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

National Parks, Wyoming, Yellowstone

Road Trip: Day 4

Grand Geyser is one of tallest geysers in the world, and the tallest predictable one. It is amazing, reaching heights of 200′ and often erupting simultaneously with Vent Geyser and Turban Geyser, both of which are very near to Grand Geyser and are connected to it hydrodynamically. Grand Geyser lies in the Upper Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park. Grand Geyser is a fountain-type geyser, meaning it erupts with a broad fountain of spray rather than the focused hose-like spray of a cone-type geyser such as Riverside Geyser, Old Faithful Geyser or Castle Geyser. Grand Geyser’s 12-hour interval is long but predictions are fairly accurate, and its show is worth the wait, especially late in the day at which time rainbows can form in the spray. Grand Geyser has an initial burst lasting about 10 minutes, followed by a cessation of activity at which point many viewers leave. But it can suddenly resume its eruption with a second burst which is often higher and more powerful than the first, so stick around when you think the show is over since it may start up again better than before.

Grand Geyser erupts (right) with a simultaneous eruption from Vent Geyser (left).  Grand Geyser is a fountain-type geyser reaching 200 feet in height and lasting up to 12 minutes.  Grand Geyser is considered the tallest predictable geyser in the world, erupting about every 12 hours.  It is often accompanied by burst or eruptions from Vent Geyser and Turban Geyser just to its left.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Grand Geyser erupts (right) with a simultaneous eruption from Vent Geyser (left). Grand Geyser is a fountain-type geyser reaching 200 feet in height and lasting up to 12 minutes. Grand Geyser is considered the tallest predictable geyser in the world, erupting about every 12 hours. It is often accompanied by burst or eruptions from Vent Geyser and Turban Geyser just to its left. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13451
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Grand Geyser erupts (right) with a simultaneous eruption from Vent Geyser (left).  Grand Geyser is a fountain-type geyser reaching 200 feet in height and lasting up to 12 minutes.  Grand Geyser is considered the tallest predictable geyser in the world, erupting about every 12 hours.  It is often accompanied by burst or eruptions from Vent Geyser and Turban Geyser just to its left.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Grand Geyser erupts (right) with a simultaneous eruption from Vent Geyser (left). Grand Geyser is a fountain-type geyser reaching 200 feet in height and lasting up to 12 minutes. Grand Geyser is considered the tallest predictable geyser in the world, erupting about every 12 hours. It is often accompanied by burst or eruptions from Vent Geyser and Turban Geyser just to its left. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13445
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Grand Geyser erupts at sunset. Grand Geyser is a fountain-type geyser reaching 200 feet in height and lasting up to 12 minutes.  Grand Geyser is considered the tallest predictable geyser in the world, erupting about every 12 hours.  It is often accompanied by burst or eruptions from Vent Geyser and Turban Geyser just to its left.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Grand Geyser erupts at sunset. Grand Geyser is a fountain-type geyser reaching 200 feet in height and lasting up to 12 minutes. Grand Geyser is considered the tallest predictable geyser in the world, erupting about every 12 hours. It is often accompanied by burst or eruptions from Vent Geyser and Turban Geyser just to its left. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13446
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Grand Geyser (right), Turban Geyser (center) and Vent Geyser (left) erupt in concert.  Grand Geyser is a fountain-type geyser reaching 200 feet in height and lasting up to 12 minutes.  Grand Geyser is considered the tallest predictable geyser in the world, erupting about every 12 hours.  It is often accompanied by burst or eruptions from Vent Geyser and Turban Geyser just to its left.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Grand Geyser (right), Turban Geyser (center) and Vent Geyser (left) erupt in concert. Grand Geyser is a fountain-type geyser reaching 200 feet in height and lasting up to 12 minutes. Grand Geyser is considered the tallest predictable geyser in the world, erupting about every 12 hours. It is often accompanied by burst or eruptions from Vent Geyser and Turban Geyser just to its left. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13450
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Keywords: grand geyser, yellowstone national park.

Photo of Lion Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

National Parks, Wyoming, Yellowstone

Road Trip: Day 4

Lion Geyser, in the Upper Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park along the Geyser Hill boardwalk, was a lucky happenstance for me. Lion Geyser, part of the Lion Group which includes a few other geysers, is difficult to observe since it is not one of geysers that the Park rangers predict. Lion Geyser has a relatively complex eruption timeline, involving major and minor eruptions that themselves occur with their own subintervals, steam phases and a rather long and unpredictable primary interval that lasts six hours to over a day in many cases. This hints at the convoluted nature of the subterranean plumbing and geothermal forces which drive the Lion Group. Lion Geyser was not even on my list of geysers to try to see this trip. However, I had just come from a wonderful eruption of nearby Grand Geyser and was walking the Geyser Hill trail for an hour before returning to Riverside Geyser to end the day, when Lion Geyser went off just as I was passing by. A pleasant woman with a European accent and I were the only two people fortunate enough to be near Lion Geyser as it gushed. We stood there quietly enjoying the show and taking pictures and video, listening to the unique roaring sound for which Lion Geyser is named.

A visitor videotapes the eruption of Lion Geyser, with Old Faithful Inn visible in the distance.  Lion Geyser, whose eruption is preceded by a release of steam that sounds like a lion roaring, erupts just once or a few times each day, reaching heights of up to 90 feet.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

A visitor videotapes the eruption of Lion Geyser, with Old Faithful Inn visible in the distance. Lion Geyser, whose eruption is preceded by a release of steam that sounds like a lion roaring, erupts just once or a few times each day, reaching heights of up to 90 feet. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13371
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Keywords: lion geyser photos, yellowstone national park.

Photo of Riverside Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

National Parks, Wyoming, Yellowstone

Road Trip: Day 3

Riverside Geyser is our favorite geyser in Yellowstone National Park. Riverside Geyser lies right at the edge of the Firehole River. It is a cone-type geyser with a tight, hose-like flow angling out over the river and reaching heights of 80′ or more. Low afternoon light often throws a spectacular rainbow across the river if the wind and the geyser mist cooperate. (Note: mild use of a polarizing filter helps bring out the rainbow, but full polarization is too much and will screw the effect badly.) Riverside Geyser is highly predictable, with an interval that is bimodally distributed at either 5.5 or 6.5 hours. It is easy to tell when Riverside Geyser is preparing to erupt. The main vent starts overflowing into the river an hour or two before eruption. The other, smaller vents will start bubbling and splashing, increasing as the eruption approaches. Just moments before it goes off, a family with just one day in Yellowstone and which has been waiting at Riverside Geyser in the hot sun for 3 hours leaves after 3-year-old Junior loses his patience, screams for a frozen yogurt and or a bathroom and goes into full meltdown as Mom and Dad drag him off. When that happens, you are golden. Just hang out a little longer … one of the vent splashes will finally “get” the eruption started. The water phase, which is amazingly scenic with the backdrop of woods and the river flowing beneath it, lasts 15-20 minutes, so there is plenty of time to shoot photos and video. Following the water phase, steam will continue to pour out of Riverside Geyser for quite a while, but it is considerably less interesting.

Absolutely fabulous.

Riverside Geyser at peak eruption, arcing over the Firehole River.  Riverside is a very predictable geyser.  Its eruptions last 30 minutes, reach heights of 75 feet and are usually spaced about 6 hours apart.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Riverside Geyser at peak eruption, arcing over the Firehole River. Riverside is a very predictable geyser. Its eruptions last 30 minutes, reach heights of 75 feet and are usually spaced about 6 hours apart. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13366
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

More Riverside Geyser Photos.

Keywords: riverside geyser, yellowstone national park.

Photo of Daisy Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

National Parks, Wyoming, Yellowstone

Road Trip: Day 3

Daisy Geyser is one of the most accessible and impressive geysers in Yellowstone National Park. Daisy Geyser is in the Upper Geyser Basin and is reached by an easy paved foot and bike path from the Old Faithful Inn area. The park rangers include Daisy Geyser in their list of predicted geysers; it erupts with an interval of about 2-3 hours and lasts for about 4 minutes, reaching heights up to 75 feet (25m). This photo shows the geyser at peak eruption with its characteristic “tilt”. Viewers can be seen on the other side of the flats surrounding Daisy Geyser.

Daisy Geyser erupting with visitors visible in the distance..  Daisy Geyser, a cone-type geyser that shoots out of the ground diagonally, is predictable with intervals ranging from 120 to over 200 minutes.  It reaches heights of 75 feet, lasts 3 to 4 minutes and rarely erupts in concert with nearby Splendid Geyser.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Daisy Geyser erupting with visitors visible in the distance.. Daisy Geyser, a cone-type geyser that shoots out of the ground diagonally, is predictable with intervals ranging from 120 to over 200 minutes. It reaches heights of 75 feet, lasts 3 to 4 minutes and rarely erupts in concert with nearby Splendid Geyser. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13381
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Keywords: daisy geyser, yellowstone national park.

Photo of Pink Cone Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

National Parks, Wyoming, Yellowstone

Road Trip: Day 3

Pink Cone Geyser lies along Firehole Lake Drive in the Lower Geyser Basin area of Yellowstone National Park, between White Dome Geyser and Firehole Lake, on the left as you drive along. Pink Cone Geyser is a small cone-type geyser whose eruptions, though widely spaced at about 9 hours to 1 day apart, last up to 2 hours. In other words, once it finally gets going it goes for a long time. Pink Cone Geyser can reach heights of 30′ (10m). Morning eruptions produce a nice rainbow in the mist of the geyser spray.

A rainbow appears in the spray of Pink Cone Geyser.  Pink Cone Geyser reaches 30 feet in height, and has highly variable interval and duration.  It is a cone-type geyser and its cone has a pinkish tint due to manganese oxide in it.  Firehole Lake Drive, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone Park, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

A rainbow appears in the spray of Pink Cone Geyser. Pink Cone Geyser reaches 30 feet in height, and has highly variable interval and duration. It is a cone-type geyser and its cone has a pinkish tint due to manganese oxide in it. Firehole Lake Drive, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone Park.
Image ID: 13549
Location: Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Keywords: pink cone geyser, yellowstone national park.

Photo of White Dome Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

National Parks, Wyoming, Yellowstone

Road Trip: Day 2

White Dome Geyser lies along Firehole Lake Drive in the Lower Geyser Basin area of Yellowstone National Park. White Dome Geyser is a cone-type geyser whose eruption, through a narrow opening of about 6 inches, reaches heights of 30′ (10m). It erupts relatively frequently — sometimes with intervals as short as 15 minutes — but unpredictably. White Dome Geyser has a large sinter cone, one of the largest in Yellowstone, a sign that it has been active as a spring or geyser for many years. If you visit White Dome Geyser in early morning (as I did) there is a good chance you will not only have the entire area to yourself, an uncommon and pleasant situation in such a popular National Park, but you may also be fortunate enough to observe a rainbow suspended in the spray of the geyser.

White Dome Geyser, with a faint rainbow visible in its mist, rises to a height of 30 feet or more, and typically erupts with an interval of 15 to 30 minutes.  It is located along Firehole Lake Drive, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

White Dome Geyser, with a faint rainbow visible in its mist, rises to a height of 30 feet or more, and typically erupts with an interval of 15 to 30 minutes. It is located along Firehole Lake Drive.
Image ID: 13541
Location: Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

Since it is so close to Firehole Lake Drive, many people happen upon White Dome Geyser just as it begins to erupt and view it from their cars. Others may see White Dome Geyser erupt while waiting at nearby Great Fountain Geyser.

Keywords: white dome geyser, yellowstone national park.