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California Sea Lion hunting Zebra Perch, Underwater, Coronado Islands, Baja California, Mexico, Hermosilla azurea, Zalophus californianus, Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado)
California Sea Lion hunting Zebra Perch, Underwater, Coronado Islands, Baja California, Mexico.
Species: California sea lion, Zebra perch, Hermosilla azurea, Zalophus californianus
Location: Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado), Baja California, Mexico
Image ID: 36484  
California Sea Lion hunting zebra perch, Coronado Islands, Baja California, Mexico, Hermosilla azurea, Zalophus californianus, Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado)
California Sea Lion hunting zebra perch, Coronado Islands, Baja California, Mexico.
Species: California sea lion, Zebra perch, Hermosilla azurea, Zalophus californianus
Location: Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado), Baja California, Mexico
Image ID: 36476  
California Sea Lions hunting Zebra Perch, Underwater, Coronado Islands, Baja California, Mexico, Hermosilla azurea, Zalophus californianus, Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado)
California Sea Lions hunting Zebra Perch, Underwater, Coronado Islands, Baja California, Mexico.
Species: California sea lion, Zebra perch, Hermosilla azurea, Zalophus californianus
Location: Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado), Baja California, Mexico
Image ID: 36483  
Epaulette shark.  The epaulette shark is primarily nocturnal, hunting for crabs, worms and invertebrates by crawling across the bottom on its overlarge fins, Hemiscyllium ocellatum
Epaulette shark. The epaulette shark is primarily nocturnal, hunting for crabs, worms and invertebrates by crawling across the bottom on its overlarge fins.
Species: Epaulette shark, Hemiscyllium ocellatum
Image ID: 14958  
Ghost lobster trap, abandoned lobster trap, San Clemente Island
Ghost lobster trap, abandoned lobster trap, San Clemente Island.
Location: San Clemente Island, California
Image ID: 30872  
Antarctic fur seal, portrait showing long whiskers and large eyes effective for nocturnal foraging and hunting underwater, Arctocephalus gazella, Right Whale Bay
Antarctic fur seal, portrait showing long whiskers and large eyes effective for nocturnal foraging and hunting underwater.
Species: Antarctic fur seal, Arctocephalus gazella
Location: Right Whale Bay, South Georgia Island
Image ID: 24355  
Malagasy ground boa.  The ground boa is the largest boa species in Madagascar, reaching 10 feet (3m) in length.  Its coloration provides excellent camouflage amid rocks, logs and bushy thickets.  It is mainly nocturnal, hunting birds and small mammals, Acrantophis madagascariensis
Malagasy ground boa. The ground boa is the largest boa species in Madagascar, reaching 10 feet (3m) in length. Its coloration provides excellent camouflage amid rocks, logs and bushy thickets. It is mainly nocturnal, hunting birds and small mammals.
Species: Malagasy ground boa, Acrantophis madagascariensis
Image ID: 12594  
Malagasy ground boa.  The ground boa is the largest boa species in Madagascar, reaching 10 feet (3m) in length.  Its coloration provides excellent camouflage amid rocks, logs and bushy thickets.  It is mainly nocturnal, hunting birds and small mammals, Acrantophis madagascariensis
Malagasy ground boa. The ground boa is the largest boa species in Madagascar, reaching 10 feet (3m) in length. Its coloration provides excellent camouflage amid rocks, logs and bushy thickets. It is mainly nocturnal, hunting birds and small mammals.
Species: Malagasy ground boa, Acrantophis madagascariensis
Image ID: 12595  
Banded archerfish.  The banded archerfish is known for its ability to shoot down resting insects by spitting a jet of water. Large archerfishes can hit a target 2-3m away. Archerfishes have adaptations to the mouth which enable spitting. When a banded archerfish shoots a jet of water, it raises its tongue against the roof of the mouth forming a tube. The gill covers quickly close forcing water along the tube. This species mostly lives in mangrove and estuarine habitats throughout much of the Indo-Pacific, Toxotes jaculatrix
Banded archerfish. The banded archerfish is known for its ability to shoot down resting insects by spitting a jet of water. Large archerfishes can hit a target 2-3m away. Archerfishes have adaptations to the mouth which enable spitting. When a banded archerfish shoots a jet of water, it raises its tongue against the roof of the mouth forming a tube. The gill covers quickly close forcing water along the tube. This species mostly lives in mangrove and estuarine habitats throughout much of the Indo-Pacific.
Species: Banded archerfish, Toxotes jaculatrix
Image ID: 12902  
Banded archerfish.  The banded archerfish is known for its ability to shoot down resting insects by spitting a jet of water. Large archerfishes can hit a target 2-3m away. Archerfishes have adaptations to the mouth which enable spitting. When a banded archerfish shoots a jet of water, it raises its tongue against the roof of the mouth forming a tube. The gill covers quickly close forcing water along the tube. This species mostly lives in mangrove and estuarine habitats throughout much of the Indo-Pacific, Toxotes jaculatrix
Banded archerfish. The banded archerfish is known for its ability to shoot down resting insects by spitting a jet of water. Large archerfishes can hit a target 2-3m away. Archerfishes have adaptations to the mouth which enable spitting. When a banded archerfish shoots a jet of water, it raises its tongue against the roof of the mouth forming a tube. The gill covers quickly close forcing water along the tube. This species mostly lives in mangrove and estuarine habitats throughout much of the Indo-Pacific.
Species: Banded archerfish, Toxotes jaculatrix
Image ID: 12903  
Banded archerfish.  The banded archerfish is known for its ability to shoot down resting insects by spitting a jet of water. Large archerfishes can hit a target 2-3m away. Archerfishes have adaptations to the mouth which enable spitting. When a banded archerfish shoots a jet of water, it raises its tongue against the roof of the mouth forming a tube. The gill covers quickly close forcing water along the tube. This species mostly lives in mangrove and estuarine habitats throughout much of the Indo-Pacific, Toxotes jaculatrix
Banded archerfish. The banded archerfish is known for its ability to shoot down resting insects by spitting a jet of water. Large archerfishes can hit a target 2-3m away. Archerfishes have adaptations to the mouth which enable spitting. When a banded archerfish shoots a jet of water, it raises its tongue against the roof of the mouth forming a tube. The gill covers quickly close forcing water along the tube. This species mostly lives in mangrove and estuarine habitats throughout much of the Indo-Pacific.
Species: Banded archerfish, Toxotes jaculatrix
Image ID: 12904  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14651  
Desert bighorn sheep, young/immature male ram.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, young/immature male ram. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14652  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14653  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14654  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14655  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram and female ewe.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram and female ewe. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14656  
Desert bighorn sheep, young/immature male ram.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, young/immature male ram. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14657  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14658  
Desert bighorn sheep, female ewe.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, female ewe. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14659  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14660  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14661  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14662  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram and female ewe.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram and female ewe. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14663  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram and female ewe.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram and female ewe. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14664  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14665  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram and female ewe.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram and female ewe. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14666  
Desert bighorn sheep, female ewe.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, female ewe. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14667  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram and female ewe.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram and female ewe. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14668  
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram.  The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico.  The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Desert bighorn sheep, male ram. The desert bighorn sheep occupies dry, rocky mountain ranges in the Mojave and Sonoran desert regions of California, Nevada and Mexico. The desert bighorn sheep is highly endangered in the United States, having a population of only about 4000 individuals, and is under survival pressure due to habitat loss, disease, over-hunting, competition with livestock, and human encroachment.
Species: Desert bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis nelsoni
Image ID: 14669