Pot-bellied Seahorse Photos, Hippocampus abdominalis


Photos of Hippocampus abdominalis, Pot-bellied seahorse
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Species   >   Hippocampus abdominalis   >             photos@oceanlight.com   +1-760-707-7153

Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis

Updated: November 27, 2020

Species permalink: Hippocampus abdominalis
Common name permalink: Pot-bellied seahorse