Search results for Abalone

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Abalone Point and Cameo Cove, Laguna Beach, Aerial Photo
Abalone Point and Cameo Cove, Laguna Beach, Aerial Photo.
Location: Laguna Beach, California
Image ID: 38146  
Pink abalone, Haliotis corrugata, San Clemente Island
Pink abalone.
Species: Green abalone, Haliotis corrugata
Location: San Clemente Island, California
Image ID: 01058  
Green abalone with mantle fringe visible extending outside shell, Haliotis fulgens
Green abalone with mantle fringe visible extending outside shell.
Species: Green abalone, Haliotis fulgens
Image ID: 09242  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21612  
Island geology, near Abalone Point, Guadalupe Island, Mexico, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)
Island geology, near Abalone Point, Guadalupe Island, Mexico.
Location: Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe), Baja California, Mexico
Image ID: 36233  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21609  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21622  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21640  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21652  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21660  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21661  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21662  
Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Red abalone.
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Image ID: 11822  
Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Red abalone.
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Image ID: 11823  
Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Red abalone.
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Image ID: 11824  
Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Red abalone.
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Image ID: 11825  
Green abalone, Haliotis fulgens
Green abalone.
Species: Green abalone, Haliotis fulgens
Image ID: 12888  
Spiny lobster and several abalone, Panulirus interruptus, San Clemente Island
Spiny lobster and several abalone.
Species: Spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus
Location: San Clemente Island, California
Image ID: 05375  
A California spiny lobster sits amid four red abalone on a shale reef shelf, Haliotis rufescens, Panulirus interruptus, San Diego
A California spiny lobster sits amid four red abalone on a shale reef shelf.
Species: Spiny lobster, Haliotis rufescens, Panulirus interruptus
Location: San Diego, California
Image ID: 02546  
Juvenile red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Juvenile red abalone.
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Image ID: 08633  
Juvenile red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Juvenile red abalone.
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Image ID: 08634  
Juvenile red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Juvenile red abalone.
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Image ID: 08635  
Juvenile red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Juvenile red abalone.
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Image ID: 08636  
Juvenile red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Juvenile red abalone.
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Image ID: 08637  
Red abalone eats Macrocystis kelp blade, Haliotis rufescens
Red abalone eats Macrocystis kelp blade.
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Image ID: 08916  
Green abalone with mantle fringe visible extending outside shell, Haliotis fulgens
Green abalone with mantle fringe visible extending outside shell.
Species: Green abalone, Haliotis fulgens
Image ID: 09243  
Green abalone, mantle and sight organs visible around edge of shell, Haliotis fulgens
Green abalone, mantle and sight organs visible around edge of shell.
Species: Green abalone, Haliotis fulgens
Image ID: 09430  
Green abalone, mantle and sight organs visible around edge of shell, Haliotis fulgens
Green abalone, mantle and sight organs visible around edge of shell.
Species: Green abalone, Haliotis fulgens
Image ID: 09431  
Granite structures form the underwater reef at Abalone Point, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)
Granite structures form the underwater reef at Abalone Point.
Location: Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe), Baja California, Mexico
Image ID: 09541  
Granite structures form the underwater reef at Abalone Point, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)
Granite structures form the underwater reef at Abalone Point.
Location: Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe), Baja California, Mexico
Image ID: 09542  
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