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Two male sockeye salmon, swimming together against the current of the Adams River.  After four years of life and two migrations of the Fraser and Adams Rivers, they will soon fertilize a female's eggs and then die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Adams River sockeye salmon.  A female sockeye salmon swims upstream in the Adams River to spawn, having traveled hundreds of miles upstream from the ocean, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Adams River sockeye salmon.  A female sockeye salmon swims upstream in the Adams River to spawn, having traveled hundreds of miles upstream from the ocean, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Carcasses of dead sockeye salmon, line the edge of the Adams River.  These salmon have already completed their spawning and have died, while other salmon are still swimming upstream and have yet to lay their eggs, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Sockeye salmon, swim upstream in the Adams River, traveling to reach the place where they hatched four years earlier in order to spawn a new generation of salmon eggs, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Steller sea lion underwater bubble display, Norris Rocks, Hornby Island, British Columbia, Canada, Eumetopias jubatus A brown pelican preening, reaching with its beak to the uropygial gland (preen gland) near the base of its tail.  Preen oil from the uropygial gland is spread by the pelican's beak and back of its head to all other feathers on the pelican, helping to keep them water resistant and dry.  Note adult winter breeding plumage in display, with brown neck, red gular throat pouch and yellow and white head, Pelecanus occidentalis, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus, La Jolla, California Darwin Falls in Death Valley, near the settlement of Panamint Springs.  The falls are fed by a perennial stream that flows through a narrow canyon of plutonic rock, and drop of total of 80' (24m) in two sections, Death Valley National Park, California Mount Whitney and Lone Pine Peak are framed by Lathe Arch in the Alabama Hills at sunrise, California, Alabama Hills Recreational Area Manta ray and remora, Manta birostris, Remora, San Benedicto Island (Islas Revillagigedos) A bull elephant seal forceably mates (copulates) with a much smaller female, often biting her into submission and using his weight to keep her from fleeing.  Males may up to 5000 lbs, triple the size of females.  Sandy beach rookery, winter, Central California, Mirounga angustirostris, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon A male sockeye salmon, showing injuries sustained as it migrated hundreds of miles from the ocean up the Fraser River, swims upstream in the Adams River to reach the place where it will fertilize eggs laid by a female in the rocks.  It will die so after spawning, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada A sockeye salmon swims in the shallows of the Adams River, with the surrounding forest visible in this split-level over-under photograph, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada A school of sockeye salmon, swimming up the Adams River to spawn, where they will lay eggs and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada A male sockeye salmon, showing injuries sustained as it migrated hundreds of miles from the ocean up the Fraser River, swims upstream in the Adams River to reach the place where it will fertilize eggs laid by a female in the rocks.  It will die so after spawning, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada A sockeye salmon swims in the shallows of the Adams River, with the surrounding forest visible in this split-level over-under photograph, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Sockeye salmon, swimming upstream in the shallow waters of the Adams River.  When they reach the place where they hatched from eggs four years earlier, they will spawn and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada A male sockeye salmon, showing injuries sustained as it migrated hundreds of miles from the ocean up the Fraser River, swims upstream in the Adams River to reach the place where it will fertilize eggs laid by a female in the rocks.  It will die so after spawning, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada A sockeye salmon swims in the shallows of the Adams River, with the surrounding forest visible in this split-level over-under photograph, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Marine iguana, underwater, forages for green algae that grows on the lava reef, Amblyrhynchus cristatus, Bartolome Island Snow geese rest on a still pond in rich orange and yellow sunrise light.  These geese have spent their night's rest on the main empoundment and will leave around sunrise to feed in nearby corn fields, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Bull elephant seal, adult male, bellowing. Its huge proboscis is characteristic of male elephant seals. Scarring from combat with other males, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon, California Bull elephant seal, adult male, bellowing. Its huge proboscis is characteristic of male elephant seals. Scarring from combat with other males, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon, California Vancouver Island hosts a profusion of spectacular anemones, on cold water reefs rich with invertebrate life. Browning Pass, Vancouver Island Anemones are found in abundance on a spectacular British Columbia underwater reef, rich with invertebrate life. Browning Pass, Vancouver Island Vancouver Island hosts a profusion of spectacular anemones, on cold water reefs rich with invertebrate life. Browning Pass, Vancouver Island Yellow sulphur sponge and white metridium anemones, on a cold water reef teeming with invertebrate life. Browning Pass, Vancouver Island, Metridium senile, Halichondria panicea Anemones are found in abundance on a spectacular British Columbia underwater reef, rich with invertebrate life. Browning Pass, Vancouver Island Mexican Barracuda, Los Islotes, Baja Califorinia, Sea of Cortez Spirobranchus Christmas Tree Worm, Fiji, Makogai Island, Lomaiviti Archipelago Chestnut cowry, San Diego, California Purple sponge with white and orange metridium anemones, below bull kelp forest, Browning Pass, Vancouver Island, Nereocystis luetkeana Colorful Metridium anemones, pink Gersemia soft corals, yellow suphur sponges cover the rocky reef in a kelp forest near Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Strait.  Strong currents bring nutrients to the invertebrate life clinging to the rocks, Gersemia rubiformis, Metridium senile, Halichondria panicea White Plumose anemones Metridium senile and Yellow Sulphur Sponge, Vancouver Island, Metridium senile, Halichondria panicea Colorful anemones and soft corals, bryozoans and sponges the rocky reef in a kelp forest near Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Strait.  Strong currents bring nutrients to the invertebrate life clinging to the rocks, Gersemia rubiformis Colorful Metridium anemones, pink Gersemia soft corals, yellow suphur sponges cover the rocky reef in a kelp forest near Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Strait.  Strong currents bring nutrients to the invertebrate life clinging to the rocks, Gersemia rubiformis, Halichondria panicea Colorful Metridium anemones, pink Gersemia soft corals, yellow suphur sponges cover the rocky reef in a kelp forest near Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Strait.  Strong currents bring nutrients to the invertebrate life clinging to the rocks, Gersemia rubiformis, Metridium farcimen, Halichondria panicea Rich invertebrate life on British Columbia marine reef. Plumose anemones, yellow sulphur sponges and pink soft corals,  Browning Pass, Vancouver Island, Canada, Gersemia rubiformis, Metridium senile Pacific double-saddle butterflyfish, Chaetodon ulietensis Banded iguana, male.  The bands of color on the male of this species change from green to either blue, grey or black, depending on mood.  Females are usually solid green, ocassionally with blue spots or a few narrow bands, Brachylophus fasciatus Freckled porcupinefish, Diodon holocanthus Pronghorn antelope, Lamar Valley.  The Pronghorn is the fastest North American land animal, capable of reaching speeds of up to 60 miles per hour. The pronghorns speed is its main defense against predators, Antilocapra americana, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Wolf eel, although similar in shape to eels, is cartilaginous and not a true fish.  Its powerful jaws can crush invertibrates, such as spiny sea urchins.  It can grow to 6 feet (2m) in length, Anarrhichthys ocellatus A small (2 inch) sanddab is well-camouflaged amidst the grains of sand that surround it, Citharichthys Bull elephant seal, adult male, bellowing. Its huge proboscis is characteristic of male elephant seals. Scarring from combat with other males.  Central California, Mirounga angustirostris, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon This bull elephant seal, an old adult male, shows extreme scarring on his chest and proboscis from many winters fighting other males for territory and rights to a harem of females.  Sandy beach rookery, winter, Central California, Mirounga angustirostris, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon A bull elephant seal forceably mates (copulates) with a much smaller female, often biting her into submission and using his weight to keep her from fleeing.  Males may up to 5000 lbs, triple the size of females.  Sandy beach rookery, winter, Central California, Mirounga angustirostris, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon Wood duck, male, Aix sponsa, Santee Lakes A brown pelican preening, reaching with its beak to the uropygial gland (preen gland) near the base of its tail.  Preen oil from the uropygial gland is spread by the pelican's beak and back of its head to all other feathers on the pelican, helping to keep them water resistant and dry. Adult winter non-breeding plumage showing white hindneck and red gular throat pouch, Pelecanus occidentalis, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus, La Jolla, California A brown pelican preening, reaching with its beak to the uropygial gland (preen gland) near the base of its tail.  Preen oil from the uropygial gland is spread by the pelican's beak and back of its head to all other feathers on the pelican, helping to keep them water resistant and dry.  Adult winter non-breeding plumage showing white hindneck and red gular throat pouch, Pelecanus occidentalis, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus, La Jolla, California   more ...

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Updated: July 16, 2020