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Snow geese at dawn.  Snow geese often "blast off" just before or after dawn, leaving the ponds where they rest for the night to forage elsewhere during the day, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Wood duck, male, Aix sponsa, Santee Lakes Snow geese in flight, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese in flight, wings are blurred in long time exposure as they are flying, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese at dawn.  Snow geese often "blast off" just before or after dawn, leaving the ponds where they rest for the night to forage elsewhere during the day, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Snow goose in flight, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese at sunrise.  Thousands of wintering snow geese take to the sky in predawn light in Bosque del Apache's famous "blast off".  The flock can be as large as 20,000 geese or more.  Long time exposure creates blurring among the geese, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Snow goose in flight, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese rest on a still pond in rich orange and yellow sunrise light.  These geese have spent their night's rest on the main empoundment and will leave around sunrise to feed in nearby corn fields, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Wood duck, male, Aix sponsa, Santee Lakes Canada geese on the Yellowstone River, Branta canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Snow geese resting, on a still pond in early morning light, in groups of several thousands, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Snow goose bearing neck and leg research ID tags, in flight, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico Snow goose in flight, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico Kelp goose eating kelp, chick and adult male showing entirely white plumage.  The kelp goose is noted for eating only seaweed, primarily of the genus ulva.  It inhabits rocky coastline habitats where it forages for kelp, Chloephaga hybrida, Chloephaga hybrida malvinarum, New Island Patagonian crested duck, spreading its wings.  The crested dusk inhabits coastal regions where it forages for invertebrates and marine algae.  The male and female are similar in appearance, Lophonetta specularioides, New Island Snow geese in flight, late afternoon light, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese, and one of the "crane pools" in the northern part of Bosque del Apache NWR, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese at dawn.  Snow geese often "blast off" just before or after dawn, leaving the ponds where they rest for the night to forage elsewhere during the day, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese blast off.  After resting and preening on water, snow geese are startled by a coyote, hawk or just wind and take off en masse by the thousands.  As many as 50,000 snow geese are found at Bosque del Apache NWR at times, stopping at the refuge during their winter migration along the Rio Grande River, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Snow goose in flight, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese, flying in syncrony through color twilight skies, wings blurred due to long time exposure, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese at sunrise.  Thousands of wintering snow geese take to the sky in predawn light in Bosque del Apache's famous "blast off".  The flock can be as large as 20,000 geese or more.  Long time exposure creates blurring among the geese, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese rest on a still pond in rich orange and yellow sunrise light.  These geese have spent their night's rest on the main empoundment and will leave around sunrise to feed in nearby corn fields, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Snow goose in flight, slowing before landing to join a flock of snow geese resting on a pond, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese in flight, Chen caerulescens, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico Upland goose, male, walking across grasslands. Males have a white head and breast, females are brown with black-striped wings and yellow feet. Upland geese are 24-29"  long and weigh about 7 lbs, Chloephaga picta, New Island Upland goose, male, beside pond in the interior of Carcass Island near Leopard Beach, Chloephaga picta Snow goose in flight, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico Snow goose in flight, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico Snow goose in flight, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico Kelp goose chicks, nestled on sand between rocks.  The kelp goose is noted for eating only seaweed, primarily of the genus ulva.  It inhabits rocky coastline habitats where it forages for kelp, Chloephaga hybrida, Chloephaga hybrida malvinarum, New Island Patagonian crested duck, adult and chick on sand beach.  The crested dusk inhabits coastal regions where it forages for invertebrates and marine algae.  The male and female are similar in appearance, Lophonetta specularioides, New Island Flightless steamer duck, on sand beach.  The flightless steamer duck is a marine duck which occupies and guards a set length of coastline as its territory and, as its name suggests, cannot fly, Tachyeres brachypterus, New Island Kelp goose chicks eating kelp (seaweed).  The kelp goose is noted for eating only seaweed, primarily of the genus ulva.  It inhabits rocky coastline habitats where it forages for kelp, Chloephaga hybrida, Chloephaga hybrida malvinarum, New Island Kelp goose, male showing entirely white plumage.  The kelp goose is noted for eating only seaweed, primarily of the genus ulva.  It inhabits rocky coastline habitats where it forages for kelp, Chloephaga hybrida, Chloephaga hybrida malvinarum, New Island Kelp goose, female with multicolored plumage very different from the pure white of male kelp geese.  The kelp goose is noted for eating only seaweed, primarily of the genus ulva.  It inhabits rocky coastline habitats where it forages for kelp, Chloephaga hybrida, Chloephaga hybrida malvinarum, New Island Kelp goose chicks, nestled on sand between rocks.  The kelp goose is noted for eating only seaweed, primarily of the genus ulva.  It inhabits rocky coastline habitats where it forages for kelp, Chloephaga hybrida, Chloephaga hybrida malvinarum, New Island Patagonian crested duck, on sand beach.  The crested dusk inhabits coastal regions where it forages for invertebrates and marine algae.  The male and female are similar in appearance, Lophonetta specularioides, New Island Upland goose, female, walking across grasslands. Males have a white head and breast, females are brown with black-striped wings and yellow feet. Upland geese are 24-29"  long and weigh about 7 lbs, Chloephaga picta, New Island Upland goose, male, walking across grasslands. Males have a white head and breast, females are brown with black-striped wings and yellow feet. Upland geese are 24-29"  long and weigh about 7 lbs, Chloephaga picta, New Island Kelp goose, male with chick, Chloephaga hybrida, Carcass Island A flock of snow geese in flight, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico American wigeon, male, Anas americana, Socorro, New Mexico American wigeon, female, Anas americana, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese in flight at sunrise.  Bosque del Apache NWR is winter home to many thousands of snow geese which are often see in vast flocks in the sky, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese and sandhill cranes, Chen caerulescens, Grus canadensis, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico Snow goose in flight, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico Snow geese in flight at sunrise.  Bosque del Apache NWR is winter home to many thousands of snow geese which are often see in vast flocks in the sky, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico A flock of snow geese in flight, Chen caerulescens, Bosque Del Apache, Socorro, New Mexico   more ...

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Updated: August 15, 2020