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A great white shark shows scarring on the left side of its body, almost certainly the result of bites from another white shark.  Certain formidable prey, such as huge elephant seals who have claws and large jaws, can also inflict injuries on the shark during the course of an attack.  Such injuries, especially to the eyes or gills, could be fatal to the shark. In this case the shark has survived its injuries and the resulting scars are helping researchers identify this shark, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Blue whale.  The entire body of a huge blue whale is seen in this image, illustrating its hydronamic and efficient shape, Balaenoptera musculus, La Jolla, California Blue whale.  The entire body of a huge blue whale is seen in this image, illustrating its hydronamic and efficient shape, Balaenoptera musculus, La Jolla, California Blue whale.  The entire body of a huge blue whale is seen in this image, illustrating its hydronamic and efficient shape, Balaenoptera musculus, La Jolla, California Body Glove boat motoring over the ocean, Redondo Beach, California Body Glove boat motoring over the ocean, Redondo Beach, California Boomer Beach, bodysurfing, La Jolla, California West Indian manatee calf with viral skin infection covering body, Trichechus manatus, Three Sisters Springs, Crystal River, Florida Gray whale carcass at oceans edge, Eschrichtius robustus, Del Mar, California Gray whale carcass at oceans edge, Eschrichtius robustus, Del Mar, California Gray whale carcass at oceans edge, Eschrichtius robustus, Del Mar, California Gray whale carcass, Laguna San Ignacio, Eschrichtius robustus, San Ignacio Lagoon Roman emperor Elegabalus (218-222 A.D.), depicted on ancient Roman coin (silver, denom/type: Antoninianus) (Antoninianus Obverse: IMP.CAES.M.AVR.ANTONINUS.AVG. Reverse: SALUS.ANTONINI.AVG. salus standing half right, holding snake across body and feeding it.) Roman emperor Elegabalus (218-222 A.D.), depicted on ancient Roman coin (silver, denom/type: Antoninianus) (Antoninianus Obverse: IMP.CAES.M.AVR.ANTONINUS.AVG. Reverse: SALUS.ANTONINI.AVG. salus standing half right, holding snake across body and feeding it.) Blue whale.  The entire body of a huge blue whale is seen in this image, illustrating its hydronamic and efficient shape, Balaenoptera musculus, La Jolla, California Blue whale.  The entire body of a huge blue whale is seen in this image, illustrating its hydronamic and efficient shape, Balaenoptera musculus, La Jolla, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter resting, holding its paws out of the water to keep them warm and conserve body heat as it floats in cold ocean water, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter resting, holding its paws out of the water to keep them warm and conserve body heat as it floats in cold ocean water, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter resting, holding its paws out of the water to keep them warm and conserve body heat as it floats in cold ocean water, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter resting, holding its paws out of the water to keep them warm and conserve body heat as it floats in cold ocean water, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter resting, holding its paws out of the water to keep them warm and conserve body heat as it floats in cold ocean water, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter, resting on its back, holding its paw out of the water for warmth.  While the sea otter has extremely dense fur on its body, the fur is less dense on its head, arms and paws so it will hold these out of the cold water to conserve body heat, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California

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Updated: July 28, 2021