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Coastal brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Juvenile female brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear on sand flats at low tide, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Young brown bear stands in tall sedge grass to get a better view of other approaching bears, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear walking on sand beach, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear walks in Silver Salmon Creek, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Brown bears fighting or sparring.  These are likely young but sexually mature males that are simply mock fighting for practice, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Mature male coastal brown bear boar waits on the tide flats at the mouth of Silver Salmon Creek for salmon to arrive.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Brown bear cubs.  These cubs are one and a half years old and have yet to leave their mother.  They will be on their own and have to fend for themselves next summer, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Full grown, mature male coastal brown bear boar (grizzly bear) in sedge grass meadows, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Brown bear female sow in sedge meadow, with her three spring cubs hidden by the deep grass next to her.  These cubs were born earlier in the spring and will remain with their mother for almost two years, relying on her completely for their survival, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear in meadow.  The tall sedge grasses in this coastal meadow are a food source for brown bears, who may eat 30 lbs of it each day during summer while waiting for their preferred food, salmon, to arrive in the nearby rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Portrait of a young brown bear, pausing while grazing in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear cub, one and a half years old, near Johnson River.  This cub will remain with its mother for about another six months, and will be on its own next year, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Lazy grizzly bear naps on a log, surrounding by the grass sedge grass that is typical of the coastal region of Lake Clark National Park, Ursus arctos Full grown, mature male coastal brown bear boar (grizzly bear) in sedge grass meadows, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear on sand flats at low tide, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Juvenile female coastal brown bear walks on beach, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear cub, one and a half years old, near Johnson River.  This cub will remain with its mother for about another six months, and will be on its own next year, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Coastal brown bear in sedge grass meadow, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska California sea lion, underwater at Santa Barbara Island.  Santa Barbara Island, 38 miles off the coast of southern California, is part of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and Channel Islands National Park.  It is home to a large population of sea lions, Zalophus californianus Coastal brown bear (grizzly bear) walks sedge grass meadow near Silver Salmon Creek, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Grizzly bear, autumn, fall, brown grasses, Ursus arctos horribilis, Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming California sea lion, Zalophus californianus, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A Pacific harbor seal hauls out on a rock.  This group of harbor seals, which has formed a breeding colony at a small but popular beach near San Diego, is at the center of considerable controversy.  While harbor seals are protected from harassment by the Marine Mammal Protection Act and other legislation, local interests would like to see the seals leave so that people can resume using the beach, Phoca vitulina richardsi, La Jolla, California Northern fur seal swims through the cold waters and kelp forest of San Miguel Island, in California's northern Channel Islands, Callorhinus ursinus California sea lions swim and socialize over a kelp-covered rocky reef, underwater at San Clemente Island in California's southern Channel Islands, Zalophus californianus California sea lions swim and socialize over a kelp-covered rocky reef, underwater at San Clemente Island in California's southern Channel Islands, Zalophus californianus California sea lions, Coronado Islands, Zalophus californianus, Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado) Galapagos sea lion playing with puffer fish, Zalophus californianus wollebacki, Zalophus californianus wollebaeki, Cousins Guadalupe fur seal mother and pup, Arctocephalus townsendi, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) California sea lion, Coronado Islands, Zalophus californianus, Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado) Pacific harbor seal swims in the protected waters of Childrens Pool in La Jolla, California.  This group of harbor seals, which has formed a breeding colony at a small but popular beach near San Diego, is at the center of considerable controversy.  While harbor seals are protected from harassment by the Marine Mammal Protection Act and other legislation, local interests would like to see the seals leave so that people can resume using the beach, Phoca vitulina richardsi California sea lions, socializing/resting, Webster Point rookery, Santa Barbara Island, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, Zalophus californianus California sea lion underwater, Zalophus californianus, Sea of Cortez SCUBA Diver and Steller Sea Lions Underwater,  underwater photographer, Hornby Island, British Columbia, Canada, Eumetopias jubatus SCUBA Diver and Steller Sea Lions Underwater,  underwater photographer, Hornby Island, British Columbia, Canada, Eumetopias jubatus, Norris Rocks SCUBA Diver and Steller Sea Lions Underwater,  underwater photographer, Hornby Island, British Columbia, Canada, Eumetopias jubatus Steller sea lion underwater, Norris Rocks, Hornby Island, British Columbia, Canada, Eumetopias jubatus SCUBA Diver and Steller Sea Lions Underwater,  underwater photographer, Hornby Island, British Columbia, Canada, Eumetopias jubatus, Norris Rocks California sea lions, underwater at Santa Barbara Island.  Santa Barbara Island, 38 miles off the coast of southern California, is part of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and Channel Islands National Park.  It is home to a large population of sea lions, Zalophus californianus Northern elephant seal, San Benito Islands, Mirounga angustirostris, San Benito Islands (Islas San Benito) Guadalupe fur seal, Arctocephalus townsendi, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)

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Updated: July 24, 2021