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A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California Add To Light Table A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California Add To Light Table Photographers wait on the beach for brown bears clamming at low tide, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Add To Light Table
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Image ID: 21661  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Image ID: 21662  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
Photographers wait on the beach for brown bears clamming at low tide.
Image ID: 19078  
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska, USA
 
Glaucus-winged gull picks up piece of razor clam left behind by a brown bear on tide flat, Larus glaucescens, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Add To Light Table Coastal brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Add To Light Table Juvenile female brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Add To Light Table
Glaucus-winged gull picks up piece of razor clam left behind by a brown bear on tide flat.
Image ID: 19288  
Species: Glaucus-winged gull, Larus glaucescens
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska, USA
 
Coastal brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide. Grizzly bear.
Image ID: 19293  
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska, USA
 
Juvenile female brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide. Grizzly bear.
Image ID: 19295  
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska, USA
 
Coastal brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska Add To Light Table A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California Add To Light Table A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California Add To Light Table
Coastal brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide. Grizzly bear.
Image ID: 19303  
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Image ID: 21689  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Image ID: 21694  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California Add To Light Table A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California Add To Light Table
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Image ID: 21695  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Image ID: 21724  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 


Natural History Photography Blog posts (6) related to Clam



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Categories Appearing Among These Images:
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Bear  >  Bear Behavior  >  Brown Bear Digging For Clams
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Bear  >  Brown Bear
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Bear  >  Grizzly Bear
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Otter  >  Sea Otter
Gallery  >  Brown Bears
Gallery  >  Lake Clark National Park
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Marine Sanctuaries  >  Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (California)  >  Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Lake Clark National Park (Alaska)
Location  >  USA  >  Alaska  >  Lake Clark National Park
Location  >  USA  >  Alaska  >  Lake Clark National Park  >  Silver Salmon Creek
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  Moss Landing  >  Elkhorn Slough

Species Appearing Among These Images:
Enhydra lutris
Larus glaucescens
Ursus arctos

Natural History Photography Blog posts (6) related to Clam
Rose Atoll, A World Treasure in Peril
Cathedral Grove, Vancouver Island
Rose Atoll Marine National Monument
Photo of a Brown Bear Digging For Clams
Silver Salmon Creek Lodge, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Pretty Young Thing

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Updated: February 27, 2021