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Latourelle Falls, in Guy W. Talbot State Park, drops 249 feet through a lush forest near the Columbia River, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon Cascades below Latourelle Falls, in Guy W. Talbot State Park, drops 249 feet through a lush forest near the Columbia River, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon Cascades below Latourelle Falls, in Guy W. Talbot State Park, drops 249 feet through a lush forest near the Columbia River, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon Water cascading through a temperate rainforest, near Triple Falls, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon Cascades flow through a lush green temperate rainforest near Triple Falls, Oneonta Gorge, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon Hiking trails through a temperature rainforest in the lush green Columbia River Gorge, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon Hiking trails through a temperature rainforest in the lush green Columbia River Gorge, Oneonta Gorge, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon Hiking trails through a temperature rainforest in the lush green Columbia River Gorge, Oneonta Gorge, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon Hiking trails through a temperature rainforest in the lush green Columbia River Gorge, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon Hiking trails through a temperature rainforest in the lush green Columbia River Gorge, Oneonta Gorge, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon Ferns grow in the lush temperate rainforest of the Columbia River Gorge, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon A fisheries biologist counts salmon migrating upstream to spawn as the fish move through the Bonneville Dam fish ladders, Columbia River, Bonneville Dam and Locks, Oregon A fisheries biologist counts salmon migrating upstream to spawn as the fish move through the Bonneville Dam fish ladders, Columbia River, Bonneville Dam and Locks, Oregon A fisheries biologist counts salmon migrating upstream to spawn as the fish move through the Bonneville Dam fish ladders, Columbia River, Bonneville Dam and Locks, Oregon A fisheries biologist counts salmon migrating upstream to spawn as the fish move through the Bonneville Dam fish ladders, Columbia River, Bonneville Dam and Locks, Oregon A fisheries biologist counts salmon migrating upstream to spawn as the fish move through the Bonneville Dam fish ladders, Columbia River, Bonneville Dam and Locks, Oregon The Hood River Bridge is a truss bridge with a vertical lift that spans the Columbia River between Hood River, Oregon and White Salmon, Washington.  The bridge is currently the second oldest road bridge across the Columbia between Washington and Oregon. It was built by the Oregon-Washington Bridge Company and opened on December 9, 1924. The original name was the Waucoma Interstate Bridge Bonneville Lock and Dam consists of several dam structures that together complete a span of the Columbia River between the US states of Oregon and Washington. The dam is located 40 miles east of Portland, Oregon, in the Columbia River Gorge. The primary functions of Bonneville Lock and Dam are those of electrical power generation and river navigation, Bonneville Dam and Locks The Columbia River stretches to the east, viewed from the Vista House overlook high above the Oregon (south) side of the river, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area Panoramic view of the Columbia River as it flows through Columbia River Gorge Scenic Area, looking east from the Vista House overlook on the southern Oregon side of the river, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area Kite boarding, Hood River, Columbia River Kite boarding, Hood River, Columbia River Kite boarding, Hood River, Columbia River Kite boarding, Hood River, Columbia River Pier 39, former site of Bumblebee Tuna cannery, now a tourist attraction, Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon Derelict pilings, remnants of long abandoned piers, Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon Derelict pilings, remnants of long abandoned piers, Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon Derelicts pilings, remnants of long abandoned piers, Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon Derelict pilings, remnants of long abandoned piers, Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon Derelict pilings, remnants of long abandoned piers, Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon Derelict pilings, remnants of long abandoned piers, Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon The Cape Disappointment lighthouse has watched over the entrance of the Columbia River since it was first lit on October 15, 1856. It stands 53 feet tall with a focal plane 220 feet above sea. Its black horizontal stripe was added later to distinguish it from North Head Lighthouse located just two miles north Sea lion head profile, showing small external ear, prominant forehead typical of adult males, whiskers.  This sea lion is hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus Sea lions hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus Sea lions hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus Sea lions hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus Sea lions hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus Sea lions hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus Sea lions hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus Sea lions hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus Sea lion head profile, showing small external ear, prominant forehead typical of adult males, whiskers.  This sea lion is hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus A bull sea lion shows a brand burned into its hide by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to monitor it from season to season as it travels between California, Oregon and Washington.  Some California sea lions, such as this one C-704, prey upon migrating salmon that gather in the downstream waters and fish ladders of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River.  The "C" in its brand denotes Columbia River. These  sea lions also form bachelor colonies that haul out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin and elsewhere, where they can damage or even sink docks, Zalophus californianus Sea lions hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus Sea lion head profile, showing small external ear, prominant forehead typical of adult males, whiskers.  This sea lion is hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus A bull sea lion shows a brand burned into its hide by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to monitor it from season to season as it travels between California, Oregon and Washington.  Some California sea lions, such as this one C-704, prey upon migrating salmon that gather in the downstream waters and fish ladders of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River.  The "C" in its brand denotes Columbia River. These  sea lions also form bachelor colonies that haul out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin and elsewhere, where they can damage or even sink docks, Zalophus californianus A bull sea lion shows a brand burned into its hide by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to monitor it from season to season as it travels between California, Oregon and Washington.  Some California sea lions, such as this one C-520, prey upon migrating salmon that gather in the downstream waters and fish ladders of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River.  The "C" in its brand denotes Columbia River. These  sea lions also form bachelor colonies that haul out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin and elsewhere, where they can damage or even sink docks, Zalophus californianus Sea lions hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus California sea lion swimming, Zalophus californianus, Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon Sea lions hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus Sea lions hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus

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Updated: September 19, 2021