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Bridal Veil Falls, a 140 foot fall in the Columbia River Gorge, is not to be confused with the more famous Bridalveil Falls in Yosemite National Park, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon
Bridal Veil Falls, a 140 foot fall in the Columbia River Gorge, is not to be confused with the more famous Bridalveil Falls in Yosemite National Park.
Location: Bridal Veil Falls, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon
Image ID: 19330  
Ponytail Falls, where Horsetail Creeks drops 100 feet over an overhang below which hikers can walk, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon
Ponytail Falls, where Horsetail Creeks drops 100 feet over an overhang below which hikers can walk.
Location: Ponytail Falls, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon
Image ID: 19338  
Cascades below Latourelle Falls, in Guy W. Talbot State Park, drops 249 feet through a lush forest near the Columbia River, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon
Cascades below Latourelle Falls, in Guy W. Talbot State Park, drops 249 feet through a lush forest near the Columbia River.
Location: Latourelle Falls, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon
Image ID: 19349  
A bull sea lion shows a brand burned into its hide by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to monitor it from season to season as it travels between California, Oregon and Washington.  Some California sea lions, such as this one C-704, prey upon migrating salmon that gather in the downstream waters and fish ladders of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River.  The "C" in its brand denotes Columbia River. These  sea lions also form bachelor colonies that haul out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin and elsewhere, where they can damage or even sink docks, Zalophus californianus
A bull sea lion shows a brand burned into its hide by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to monitor it from season to season as it travels between California, Oregon and Washington. Some California sea lions, such as this one C-704, prey upon migrating salmon that gather in the downstream waters and fish ladders of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. The "C" in its brand denotes Columbia River. These sea lions also form bachelor colonies that haul out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin and elsewhere, where they can damage or even sink docks.
Species: California sea lion, Zalophus californianus
Location: Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon
Image ID: 19419  
Sea lion head profile, showing small external ear, prominant forehead typical of adult males, whiskers.  This sea lion is hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin.  This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River.  The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees, Zalophus californianus
Sea lion head profile, showing small external ear, prominant forehead typical of adult males, whiskers. This sea lion is hauled out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin. This bachelor colony of adult males takes up residence for several weeks in late summer on public docks in Astoria after having fed upon migrating salmon in the Columbia River. The sea lions can damage or even sink docks and some critics feel that they cost the city money in the form of lost dock fees.
Species: California sea lion, Zalophus californianus
Location: Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon
Image ID: 19420  
A sockeye salmon swims in the shallows of the Adams River, with the surrounding forest visible in this split-level over-under photograph, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
A sockeye salmon swims in the shallows of the Adams River, with the surrounding forest visible in this split-level over-under photograph.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26150  
Adams River sockeye salmon.  A female sockeye salmon swims upstream in the Adams River to spawn, having traveled hundreds of miles upstream from the ocean, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Adams River sockeye salmon. A female sockeye salmon swims upstream in the Adams River to spawn, having traveled hundreds of miles upstream from the ocean.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26159  
Adams River sockeye salmon.  A female sockeye salmon swims upstream in the Adams River to spawn, having traveled hundreds of miles upstream from the ocean, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Adams River sockeye salmon. A female sockeye salmon swims upstream in the Adams River to spawn, having traveled hundreds of miles upstream from the ocean.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26160  
A male sockeye salmon, showing injuries sustained as it migrated hundreds of miles from the ocean up the Fraser River, swims upstream in the Adams River to reach the place where it will fertilize eggs laid by a female in the rocks.  It will die soon after spawning, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
A male sockeye salmon, showing injuries sustained as it migrated hundreds of miles from the ocean up the Fraser River, swims upstream in the Adams River to reach the place where it will fertilize eggs laid by a female in the rocks. It will die soon after spawning.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26162  
Sockeye salmon, swim upstream in the Adams River, traveling to reach the place where they hatched four years earlier in order to spawn a new generation of salmon eggs, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Sockeye salmon, swim upstream in the Adams River, traveling to reach the place where they hatched four years earlier in order to spawn a new generation of salmon eggs.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26172  
Sockeye salmon, swimming upstream in the shallow waters of the Adams River.  When they reach the place where they hatched from eggs four years earlier, they will spawn and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Sockeye salmon, swimming upstream in the shallow waters of the Adams River. When they reach the place where they hatched from eggs four years earlier, they will spawn and die.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26173  
Two male sockeye salmon, swimming together against the current of the Adams River.  After four years of life and two migrations of the Fraser and Adams Rivers, they will soon fertilize a female's eggs and then die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Two male sockeye salmon, swimming together against the current of the Adams River. After four years of life and two migrations of the Fraser and Adams Rivers, they will soon fertilize a female's eggs and then die.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26179  
Two male sockeye salmon, swimming together against the current of the Adams River.  After four years of life and two migrations of the Fraser and Adams Rivers, they will soon fertilize a female's eggs and then die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Two male sockeye salmon, swimming together against the current of the Adams River. After four years of life and two migrations of the Fraser and Adams Rivers, they will soon fertilize a female's eggs and then die.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26180  
A male sockeye salmon, showing injuries sustained as it migrated hundreds of miles from the ocean up the Fraser River, swims upstream in the Adams River to reach the place where it will fertilize eggs laid by a female in the rocks.  It will die so after spawning, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
A male sockeye salmon, showing injuries sustained as it migrated hundreds of miles from the ocean up the Fraser River, swims upstream in the Adams River to reach the place where it will fertilize eggs laid by a female in the rocks. It will die so after spawning.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26174  
Adams River sockeye salmon.  A female sockeye salmon swims upstream in the Adams River to spawn, having traveled hundreds of miles upstream from the ocean, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Adams River sockeye salmon. A female sockeye salmon swims upstream in the Adams River to spawn, having traveled hundreds of miles upstream from the ocean.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26175  
A school of sockeye salmon, swimming up the Adams River to spawn, where they will lay eggs and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
A school of sockeye salmon, swimming up the Adams River to spawn, where they will lay eggs and die.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26176  
Adams River sockeye salmon.  A female sockeye salmon swims upstream in the Adams River to spawn, having traveled hundreds of miles upstream from the ocean, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Adams River sockeye salmon. A female sockeye salmon swims upstream in the Adams River to spawn, having traveled hundreds of miles upstream from the ocean.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26178  
Sockeye salmon, migrating upstream in the Adams River to return to the spot where they were hatched four years earlier, where they will spawn, lay eggs and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Sockeye salmon, migrating upstream in the Adams River to return to the spot where they were hatched four years earlier, where they will spawn, lay eggs and die.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26392  
Sockeye salmon, migrating upstream in the Adams River to return to the spot where they were hatched four years earlier, where they will spawn, lay eggs and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Sockeye salmon, migrating upstream in the Adams River to return to the spot where they were hatched four years earlier, where they will spawn, lay eggs and die.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26393  
Sockeye salmon, migrating upstream in the Adams River to return to the spot where they were hatched four years earlier, where they will spawn, lay eggs and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Sockeye salmon, migrating upstream in the Adams River to return to the spot where they were hatched four years earlier, where they will spawn, lay eggs and die.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26394  
Sockeye salmon, migrating upstream in the Adams River to return to the spot where they were hatched four years earlier, where they will spawn, lay eggs and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Sockeye salmon, migrating upstream in the Adams River to return to the spot where they were hatched four years earlier, where they will spawn, lay eggs and die.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26395  
A school of sockeye salmon, swimming up the Adams River to spawn, where they will lay eggs and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
A school of sockeye salmon, swimming up the Adams River to spawn, where they will lay eggs and die.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26414  
A school of sockeye salmon, swimming up the Adams River to spawn, where they will lay eggs and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
A school of sockeye salmon, swimming up the Adams River to spawn, where they will lay eggs and die.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26415  
Multnomah Falls. Plummeting 620 feet from its origins on Larch Mountain, Multnomah Falls is the second highest year-round waterfall in the United States. Nearly two million visitors a year come to see this ancient waterfall making it Oregon's number one public destination, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area
Multnomah Falls. Plummeting 620 feet from its origins on Larch Mountain, Multnomah Falls is the second highest year-round waterfall in the United States. Nearly two million visitors a year come to see this ancient waterfall making it Oregon's number one public destination.
Location: Multnomah Falls, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon
Image ID: 28666  
Multnomah Falls. Plummeting 620 feet from its origins on Larch Mountain, Multnomah Falls is the second highest year-round waterfall in the United States. Nearly two million visitors a year come to see this ancient waterfall making it Oregon's number one public destination, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area
Multnomah Falls. Plummeting 620 feet from its origins on Larch Mountain, Multnomah Falls is the second highest year-round waterfall in the United States. Nearly two million visitors a year come to see this ancient waterfall making it Oregon's number one public destination.
Location: Multnomah Falls, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon
Image ID: 28667  
Columbia River viewed from Crown Point, sunset, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon
Columbia River viewed from Crown Point, sunset.
Location: Crown Point, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon
Image ID: 28674  
Sockeye salmon, migrating upstream in the Adams River to return to the spot where they were hatched four years earlier, where they will spawn, lay eggs and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Sockeye salmon, migrating upstream in the Adams River to return to the spot where they were hatched four years earlier, where they will spawn, lay eggs and die.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26184  
Sockeye salmon, swim upstream in the Adams River, traveling to reach the place where they hatched four years earlier in order to spawn a new generation of salmon eggs, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Sockeye salmon, swim upstream in the Adams River, traveling to reach the place where they hatched four years earlier in order to spawn a new generation of salmon eggs.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26181  
A sockeye salmon, a male sockeye dying on the edge of the Adams River, has completed its journey of hundreds of miles upstream inthe Fraser and Adams Rivers just to reach this spot, so that it can fertilize a females nest of eggs before dying, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
A sockeye salmon, a male sockeye dying on the edge of the Adams River, has completed its journey of hundreds of miles upstream inthe Fraser and Adams Rivers just to reach this spot, so that it can fertilize a females nest of eggs before dying.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26182  
Carcasses of dead sockeye salmon, line the edge of the Adams River.  These salmon have already completed their spawning and have died, while other salmon are still swimming upstream and have yet to lay their eggs, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Carcasses of dead sockeye salmon, line the edge of the Adams River. These salmon have already completed their spawning and have died, while other salmon are still swimming upstream and have yet to lay their eggs.
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 26183