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A great white shark swims just below the rippled ocean surface of Isla Guadalupe, far offshore of the Pacific Coast of Baja California, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Tiger shark close up view, including nostrils and ampullae of Lorenzini, Galeocerdo cuvier Photographing down the throat of a tiger shark with a Gopro on a selfie-stick, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark close up view, including nostrils and ampullae of Lorenzini, Galeocerdo cuvier Expert hand feeds multiple tiger sharks in the Bahamas, Galeocerdo cuvier Two tiger sharks, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark and horse-eye jacks, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark and underwater photographer, Galeocerdo cuvier Expert hand feeds multiple tiger sharks in the Bahamas, Galeocerdo cuvier Expert hand feeds multiple tiger sharks in the Bahamas, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark and underwater photographer, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark swimming over eel grass, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark and SCUBA diver, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark with GoPro mounted on its dorsal fin, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark swimming over coral reef, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark and underwater photographer, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark swimming over coral reef, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark and underwater photographer, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark close up view, including nostrils and ampullae of Lorenzini, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark and underwater photographer, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark and underwater photographer, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark and underwater photographer, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark close up view, including nostrils and ampullae of Lorenzini, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark and horse-eye jacks, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier Injured tiger shark.  This young and small tiger shark shows injuries about its face, likely from bites by other sharks, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark and SCUBA diver, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark and horse-eye jacks, Galeocerdo cuvier Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier Injured tiger shark.  This young and small tiger shark shows injuries about its face, likely from bites by other sharks, Galeocerdo cuvier Dorsal fin of a great white shark breaks the surface as the shark swims just below, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A SCUBA diver enters a submarine cavern at Santa Barbara Island, underwater cave A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark swims toward the photographer.  Perhaps the shark is considering him as possible prey?  The photographer, a "shark diver" is safely situated in a sturdy metal cage.  The best  location in the world to "shark dive" to view great white sharks is Mexico's Guadalupe Island, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark swims through the clear waters of Isla Guadalupe, far offshore of the Pacific Coast of Mexico's Baja California. Guadalupe Island is host to a concentration of large great white sharks, which visit the island to feed on pinnipeds and use it as a staging area before journeying farther into the Pacific ocean, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark is countershaded, with a dark gray dorsal color and light gray to white underside, making it more difficult for the shark's prey to see it as approaches from above or below in the water column.  The particular undulations of the countershading line along its side, where gray meets white, is unique to each shark and helps researchers to identify individual sharks in capture-recapture studies. Guadalupe Island is host to a relatively large population of great white sharks who, through a history of video and photographs showing their  countershading lines, are the subject of an ongoing study of shark behaviour, migration and population size, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) A great white shark swims away, showing its powerful caudal fin (tail), short anal fins on its underside, tall dorsal fin on top and sweeping winglike pectoral fins, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)   more ...

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Updated: September 24, 2021