Search results for Douglas Fir

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Capilano Suspension Bridge, 140 m (450 ft) long and hanging 70 m (230 ft) above the Capilano River.  The two pre-stressed steel cables supporting the bridge are each capable of supporting 45,000 kgs and together can hold about 1300 people, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Capilano Suspension Bridge, 140 m (450 ft) long and hanging 70 m (230 ft) above the Capilano River. The two pre-stressed steel cables supporting the bridge are each capable of supporting 45,000 kgs and together can hold about 1300 people.
Location: Capilano Suspension Bridge, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 21143  
Capilano Suspension Bridge, 140 m (450 ft) long and hanging 70 m (230 ft) above the Capilano River.  The two pre-stressed steel cables supporting the bridge are each capable of supporting 45,000 kgs and together can hold about 1300 people, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Capilano Suspension Bridge, 140 m (450 ft) long and hanging 70 m (230 ft) above the Capilano River. The two pre-stressed steel cables supporting the bridge are each capable of supporting 45,000 kgs and together can hold about 1300 people.
Location: Capilano Suspension Bridge, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 21144  
Capilano Suspension Bridge, 140 m (450 ft) long and hanging 70 m (230 ft) above the Capilano River.  The two pre-stressed steel cables supporting the bridge are each capable of supporting 45,000 kgs and together can hold about 1300 people, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Capilano Suspension Bridge, 140 m (450 ft) long and hanging 70 m (230 ft) above the Capilano River. The two pre-stressed steel cables supporting the bridge are each capable of supporting 45,000 kgs and together can hold about 1300 people.
Location: Capilano Suspension Bridge, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 21145  
Ferns grow below coastal redwood and Douglas Fir trees, Lady Bird Johnson Grove, Redwood National Park.  The coastal redwood, or simply 'redwood', is the tallest tree on Earth, reaching a height of 379' and living 3500 years or more.  It is native to coastal California and the southwestern corner of Oregon within the United States, but most concentrated in Redwood National and State Parks in Northern California, found close to the coast where moisture and soil conditions can support its unique size and growth requirements, Sequoia sempervirens
Ferns grow below coastal redwood and Douglas Fir trees, Lady Bird Johnson Grove, Redwood National Park. The coastal redwood, or simply 'redwood', is the tallest tree on Earth, reaching a height of 379' and living 3500 years or more. It is native to coastal California and the southwestern corner of Oregon within the United States, but most concentrated in Redwood National and State Parks in Northern California, found close to the coast where moisture and soil conditions can support its unique size and growth requirements.
Species: California redwood, Coast redwood, Giant redwood, Sequoia sempervirens
Location: Redwood National Park, California
Image ID: 25840  
Douglas fir and coast redwood trees, Jedediah Smith State Park
Douglas fir and coast redwood trees, Jedediah Smith State Park.
Location: Jedediah Smith State Park, California
Image ID: 25853  
Douglas fir and coast redwood trees, Jedediah Smith State Park
Douglas fir and coast redwood trees, Jedediah Smith State Park.
Location: Jedediah Smith State Park, California
Image ID: 25854  
Sol Duc Falls. Sol Duc Falls is one of the largest and most beautiful waterfalls in Olympic National Park. Surrounding the falls is an old-growth forest of hemlocks and douglas firs, some of which are three hundred years in age, Sol Duc Springs
Sol Duc Falls. Sol Duc Falls is one of the largest and most beautiful waterfalls in Olympic National Park. Surrounding the falls is an old-growth forest of hemlocks and douglas firs, some of which are three hundred years in age.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13749  
Sol Duc Falls. Sol Duc Falls is one of the largest and most beautiful waterfalls in Olympic National Park. Surrounding the falls is an old-growth forest of hemlocks and douglas firs, some of which are three hundred years in age, Sol Duc Springs
Sol Duc Falls. Sol Duc Falls is one of the largest and most beautiful waterfalls in Olympic National Park. Surrounding the falls is an old-growth forest of hemlocks and douglas firs, some of which are three hundred years in age.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13750  
Sol Duc Falls.  Sol Duc Falls is one of the largest and most beautiful waterfalls in Olympic National Park, seen here from a bridge that crosses the canyon just below the falls. Surrounding the falls is an old-growth forest of hemlocks and douglas firs, some of which are three hundred years in age, Sol Duc Springs
Sol Duc Falls. Sol Duc Falls is one of the largest and most beautiful waterfalls in Olympic National Park, seen here from a bridge that crosses the canyon just below the falls. Surrounding the falls is an old-growth forest of hemlocks and douglas firs, some of which are three hundred years in age.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13751  
Sol Duc Falls. Sol Duc Falls is one of the largest and most beautiful waterfalls in Olympic National Park. Surrounding the falls is an old-growth forest of hemlocks and douglas firs, some of which are three hundred years in age, Sol Duc Springs
Sol Duc Falls. Sol Duc Falls is one of the largest and most beautiful waterfalls in Olympic National Park. Surrounding the falls is an old-growth forest of hemlocks and douglas firs, some of which are three hundred years in age.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13752  
A hiking path leads through old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses.  Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
A hiking path leads through old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses. Sol Duc Springs.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13753  
A hiking path leads through old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses.  Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
A hiking path leads through old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses. Sol Duc Springs.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13754  
A fallen tree serves as a nurse log for new growth in an old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses.  Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
A fallen tree serves as a nurse log for new growth in an old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses. Sol Duc Springs.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13755  
Old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses.  Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses. Sol Duc Springs.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13756  
Old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses.  Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses. Sol Duc Springs.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13758  
A small waterfall tumbles through old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks.  Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
A small waterfall tumbles through old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks. Sol Duc Springs.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13759  
A small waterfall tumbles through old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks.  Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
A small waterfall tumbles through old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks. Sol Duc Springs.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13760  
A small waterfall tumbles through old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks.  Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
A small waterfall tumbles through old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks. Sol Duc Springs.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13761  
Old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses.  Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses. Sol Duc Springs.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13762  
Old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses.  Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Old growth forest of douglas firs and hemlocks, with forest floor carpeted in ferns and mosses. Sol Duc Springs.
Location: Sol Duc Springs, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13763  
Marymere Falls drops 90 feet through an old-growth forest of Douglas firs, near Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington
Marymere Falls drops 90 feet through an old-growth forest of Douglas firs, near Lake Crescent.
Location: Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13766  
Marymere Falls drops 90 feet through an old-growth forest of Douglas firs, near Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington
Marymere Falls drops 90 feet through an old-growth forest of Douglas firs, near Lake Crescent.
Location: Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13767  
Marymere Falls drops 90 feet through an old-growth forest of Douglas firs, near Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington
Marymere Falls drops 90 feet through an old-growth forest of Douglas firs, near Lake Crescent.
Location: Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13769  
Marymere Falls drops 90 feet through an old-growth forest of Douglas firs, near Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington
Marymere Falls drops 90 feet through an old-growth forest of Douglas firs, near Lake Crescent.
Location: Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13770  
Marymere Falls drops 90 feet through an old-growth forest of Douglas firs, near Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington
Marymere Falls drops 90 feet through an old-growth forest of Douglas firs, near Lake Crescent.
Location: Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington
Image ID: 13771  
Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove.  Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees.  About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove.  Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees, Pseudotsuga menziesii, MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove. Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees. About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove. Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees.
Species: Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii
Location: Cathedral Grove, MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 21024  
Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove.  Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees.  About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove.  Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees, Pseudotsuga menziesii, MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove. Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees. About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove. Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees.
Species: Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii
Location: Cathedral Grove, MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 21026  
Footpath in Cathedral Grove.  Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees.  About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove.  Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees, MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Footpath in Cathedral Grove. Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees. About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove. Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees.
Location: Cathedral Grove, MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 21028  
Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove.  Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees.  About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove.  Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees, Pseudotsuga menziesii, MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove. Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees. About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove. Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees.
Species: Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii
Location: Cathedral Grove, MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 21029  
Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove.  Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees.  About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove.  Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees, Pseudotsuga menziesii, MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove. Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees. About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove. Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees.
Species: Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii
Location: Cathedral Grove, MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 21032  
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