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Sockeye salmon, migrating upstream in the Adams River to return to the spot where they were hatched four years earlier, where they will spawn, lay eggs and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada A male sockeye salmon, showing injuries sustained as it migrated hundreds of miles from the ocean up the Fraser River, swims upstream in the Adams River to reach the place where it will fertilize eggs laid by a female in the rocks.  It will die so after spawning, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Ring-tailed cardinal fish, Male tending eggs in his mouth, Ostorhinchus aureus, Fiji, Ostorhinchus aureus, Namena Marine Reserve, Namena Island A school of sockeye salmon, swimming up the Adams River to spawn, where they will lay eggs and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Sockeye salmon, swim upstream in the Adams River, traveling to reach the place where they hatched four years earlier in order to spawn a new generation of salmon eggs, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Sockeye salmon, swimming upstream in the shallow waters of the Adams River.  When they reach the place where they hatched from eggs four years earlier, they will spawn and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Two male sockeye salmon, swimming together against the current of the Adams River.  After four years of life and two migrations of the Fraser and Adams Rivers, they will soon fertilize a female's eggs and then die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Freediver photographing pelagic gelatinous zooplankton, adrift in the open ocean, Phacellophora camtschatica, San Diego, California Carcasses of dead sockeye salmon, line the edge of the Adams River.  These salmon have already completed their spawning and have died, while other salmon are still swimming upstream and have yet to lay their eggs, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Sockeye salmon, swim upstream in the Adams River, traveling to reach the place where they hatched four years earlier in order to spawn a new generation of salmon eggs, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada A male sockeye salmon, showing injuries sustained as it migrated hundreds of miles from the ocean up the Fraser River, swims upstream in the Adams River to reach the place where it will fertilize eggs laid by a female in the rocks.  It will die so after spawning, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada A school of sockeye salmon, swimming up the Adams River to spawn, where they will lay eggs and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada A male sockeye salmon, showing injuries sustained as it migrated hundreds of miles from the ocean up the Fraser River, swims upstream in the Adams River to reach the place where it will fertilize eggs laid by a female in the rocks.  It will die so after spawning, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Sockeye salmon, swimming upstream in the shallow waters of the Adams River.  When they reach the place where they hatched from eggs four years earlier, they will spawn and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada A male sockeye salmon, showing injuries sustained as it migrated hundreds of miles from the ocean up the Fraser River, swims upstream in the Adams River to reach the place where it will fertilize eggs laid by a female in the rocks.  It will die so after spawning, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Nest and Eggs, Clipperton Island Egg-yolk jellyfish, fried egg jelly, Phacellophora camtschatica Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Squid eggs, La Jolla Canyon, Loligo opalescens Simnia and egg cluster on gorgonian, Delonovolva aequalis, Anacapa Island Squid egg clusters on sand, Loligo opalescens, La Jolla, California A male sockeye salmon, showing injuries sustained as it migrated hundreds of miles from the ocean up the Fraser River, swims upstream in the Adams River to reach the place where it will fertilize eggs laid by a female in the rocks.  It will die soon after spawning, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Sockeye salmon, swim upstream in the Adams River, traveling to reach the place where they hatched four years earlier in order to spawn a new generation of salmon eggs, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Nest and Eggs, Clipperton Island Garibaldi maintains a patch of algae (just in front of the fish) to entice a female to lay a clutch of eggs, Hypsypops rubicundus, Catalina Island King penguin colony. Over 100,000 pairs of king penguins nest at Salisbury Plain, laying eggs in December and February, then alternating roles between foraging for food and caring for the egg or chick, Aptenodytes patagonicus Sockeye salmon, swimming upstream in the shallow waters of the Adams River.  When they reach the place where they hatched from eggs four years earlier, they will spawn and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Two male sockeye salmon, swimming together against the current of the Adams River.  After four years of life and two migrations of the Fraser and Adams Rivers, they will soon fertilize a female's eggs and then die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Two male sockeye salmon, swimming together against the current of the Adams River.  After four years of life and two migrations of the Fraser and Adams Rivers, they will soon fertilize a female's eggs and then die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Freediver photographing pelagic gelatinous zooplankton, adrift in the open ocean, Phacellophora camtschatica, San Diego, California King penguin colony at Salisbury Plain, Bay of Isles, South Georgia Island.  Over 100,000 pairs of king penguins nest here, laying eggs in December and February, then alternating roles between foraging for food and caring for the egg or chick, Aptenodytes patagonicus King penguin colony. Over 100,000 pairs of king penguins nest at Salisbury Plain, laying eggs in December and February, then alternating roles between foraging for food and caring for the egg or chick, Aptenodytes patagonicus King penguin colony. Over 100,000 pairs of king penguins nest at Salisbury Plain, laying eggs in December and February, then alternating roles between foraging for food and caring for the egg or chick, Aptenodytes patagonicus Black-browed albatross colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands.  This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs.  The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days, Thalassarche melanophrys Black-browed albatross colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands.  This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs.  The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days, Thalassarche melanophrys Black-browed albatross, feeding its chick on the nest by regurgitating food it was swallowed while foraging at sea, Steeple Jason Island breeding colony.  The single egg is laid in September or October.  Incubation takes 68 to 71 days, after which the chick is tended alternately by both adults until it fledges about 120 days later, Thalassarche melanophrys Black-browed albatross chick on its nest, Steeple Jason Island breeding colony.  The single egg is laid in September or October.  Incubation takes 68 to 71 days, after which the chick is tended alternately by both adults until it fledges about 120 days later, Thalassarche melanophrys Black-browed albatross colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands.  This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs.  The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days, Thalassarche melanophrys King penguin colony. Over 100,000 pairs of king penguins nest at Salisbury Plain, laying eggs in December and February, then alternating roles between foraging for food and caring for the egg or chick, Aptenodytes patagonicus King penguin colony. Over 100,000 pairs of king penguins nest at Salisbury Plain, laying eggs in December and February, then alternating roles between foraging for food and caring for the egg or chick, Aptenodytes patagonicus King penguin colony at Salisbury Plain, Bay of Isles, South Georgia Island.  Over 100,000 pairs of king penguins nest here, laying eggs in December and February, then alternating roles between foraging for food and caring for the egg or chick, Aptenodytes patagonicus King penguin colony at Salisbury Plain, Bay of Isles, South Georgia Island.  Over 100,000 pairs of king penguins nest here, laying eggs in December and February, then alternating roles between foraging for food and caring for the egg or chick, Aptenodytes patagonicus Black-browed albatross, adult and chick, at the enormous colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands.  This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs.  The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days, Thalassarche melanophrys Black-browed albatross colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands.  This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs.  The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days, Thalassarche melanophrys King penguin colony at Salisbury Plain, Bay of Isles, South Georgia Island.  Over 100,000 pairs of king penguins nest here, laying eggs in December and February, then alternating roles between foraging for food and caring for the egg or chick, Aptenodytes patagonicus A male sockeye salmon, showing injuries sustained as it migrated hundreds of miles from the ocean up the Fraser River, swims upstream in the Adams River to reach the place where it will fertilize eggs laid by a female in the rocks.  It will die so after spawning, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada A school of sockeye salmon, swimming up the Adams River to spawn, where they will lay eggs and die, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Simnia and egg cluster on red gorgonian, Delonovolva aequalis, Lophogorgia chilensis, Anacapa Island Black-browed albatross colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands.  This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs.  The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days, Thalassarche melanophrys   more ...

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Updated: November 29, 2020