Search results for Egg


Natural History Photography Home      Blog      Image Search
1 2 3 4 -5-    Compact View

Egg   >             photos@oceanlight.com   +1-760-707-7153

Black-browed albatross colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands.  This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs.  The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days, Thalassarche melanophrys Add To Light Table Black-browed albatross colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands.  This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs.  The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days, Thalassarche melanophrys Add To Light Table Black-browed albatross colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands.  This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs.  The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days, Thalassarche melanophrys Add To Light Table
Black-browed albatross colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands. This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs. The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days.
Image ID: 24268  
Species: Black-browed albatross, Thalassarche melanophrys
Location: Steeple Jason Island, Falkland Islands, United Kingdom
 
Black-browed albatross colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands. This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs. The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days.
Image ID: 24269  
Species: Black-browed albatross, Thalassarche melanophrys
Location: Steeple Jason Island, Falkland Islands, United Kingdom
 
Black-browed albatross colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands. This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs. The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days.
Image ID: 24270  
Species: Black-browed albatross, Thalassarche melanophrys
Location: Steeple Jason Island, Falkland Islands, United Kingdom
 
Black-browed albatross colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands.  This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs.  The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days, Thalassarche melanophrys Add To Light Table Sockeye salmon, swim upstream in the Adams River, traveling to reach the place where they hatched four years earlier in order to spawn a new generation of salmon eggs, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Add To Light Table A sockeye salmon, a male sockeye dying on the edge of the Adams River, has completed its journey of hundreds of miles upstream inthe Fraser and Adams Rivers just to reach this spot, so that it can fertilize a females nest of eggs before dying, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Add To Light Table
Black-browed albatross colony on Steeple Jason Island in the Falklands. This is the largest breeding colony of black-browed albatrosses in the world, numbering in the hundreds of thousands of breeding pairs. The albatrosses lay eggs in September and October, and tend a single chick that will fledge in about 120 days.
Image ID: 24271  
Species: Black-browed albatross, Thalassarche melanophrys
Location: Steeple Jason Island, Falkland Islands, United Kingdom
 
Sockeye salmon, swim upstream in the Adams River, traveling to reach the place where they hatched four years earlier in order to spawn a new generation of salmon eggs.
Image ID: 26181  
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
 
A sockeye salmon, a male sockeye dying on the edge of the Adams River, has completed its journey of hundreds of miles upstream inthe Fraser and Adams Rivers just to reach this spot, so that it can fertilize a females nest of eggs before dying.
Image ID: 26182  
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
 
Carcasses of dead sockeye salmon, line the edge of the Adams River.  These salmon have already completed their spawning and have died, while other salmon are still swimming upstream and have yet to lay their eggs, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada Add To Light Table Sockeye salmon, swim upstream in the Adams River, traveling to reach the place where they hatched four years earlier in order to spawn a new generation of salmon eggs, Oncorhynchus nerka, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada This photo is the top of a stack of similar images, click to see them all.Add To Light Table Black-browed albatross, adult on nest with egg, Thalassarche melanophrys, Westpoint Island Add To Light Table
Carcasses of dead sockeye salmon, line the edge of the Adams River. These salmon have already completed their spawning and have died, while other salmon are still swimming upstream and have yet to lay their eggs.
Image ID: 26183  
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
 
Sockeye salmon, swim upstream in the Adams River, traveling to reach the place where they hatched four years earlier in order to spawn a new generation of salmon eggs.
Image ID: 26189  
Species: Sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka
Location: Adams River, Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
 
Black-browed albatross, adult on nest with egg.
Image ID: 23940  
Species: Black-browed albatross, Thalassarche melanophrys
Location: Westpoint Island, Falkland Islands, United Kingdom
 
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Add To Light Table Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Add To Light Table Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Add To Light Table
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs. The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male. Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth. The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood.
Image ID: 11027  
Species: Pot-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis
 
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs. The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male. Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth. The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood.
Image ID: 11031  
Species: Pot-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis
 
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs. The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male. Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth. The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood.
Image ID: 11032  
Species: Pot-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis
 
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Add To Light Table Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Add To Light Table Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Add To Light Table
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs. The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male. Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth. The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood.
Image ID: 11897  
Species: Pot-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis
 
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs. The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male. Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth. The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood.
Image ID: 11898  
Species: Pot-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis
 
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs. The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male. Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth. The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood.
Image ID: 11900  
Species: Pot-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis
 
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Add To Light Table Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Add To Light Table Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Add To Light Table
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs. The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male. Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth. The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood.
Image ID: 11901  
Species: Pot-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis
 
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs. The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male. Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth. The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood.
Image ID: 11902  
Species: Pot-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis
 
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs. The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male. Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth. The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood.
Image ID: 11903  
Species: Pot-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis
 
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs.  The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male.  Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth.  The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood, Hippocampus abdominalis Add To Light Table Grunt sculpin.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Add To Light Table Grunt sculpin poised in a barnacle shell.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Add To Light Table
Pot-bellied seahorse, male, carrying eggs. The developing embryos are nourished by individual yolk sacs, and oxygen is supplied through a placenta-like attachment to the male. Two to six weeks after fertilization, the male gives birth. The babies must then fend for themselves, and few survive to adulthood.
Image ID: 11904  
Species: Pot-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis
 
Grunt sculpin. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13724  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin poised in a barnacle shell. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13725  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin poised in a barnacle shell.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Add To Light Table Grunt sculpin.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Add To Light Table Grunt sculpin.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Add To Light Table
Grunt sculpin poised in a barnacle shell. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13726  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13727  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13728  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Add To Light Table Grunt sculpin.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Add To Light Table Grunt sculpin.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Add To Light Table
Grunt sculpin. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13729  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13730  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13731  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Wild discus.  The female wild discuss will lay several hundred eggs and guard them until they hatch.  Once they emerge, the young fish attach themselves to the sides of their parents for the first few weeks of their lives, feeding on a milky secretion produced by glands in the parents flanks, Symphysodon discus Add To Light Table Wild discus.  The female wild discuss will lay several hundred eggs and guard them until they hatch.  Once they emerge, the young fish attach themselves to the sides of their parents for the first few weeks of their lives, feeding on a milky secretion produced by glands in the parents flanks, Symphysodon discus Add To Light Table
Wild discus. The female wild discuss will lay several hundred eggs and guard them until they hatch. Once they emerge, the young fish attach themselves to the sides of their parents for the first few weeks of their lives, feeding on a milky secretion produced by glands in the parents flanks.
Image ID: 13953  
Species: Wild discus, Symphysodon discus
 
Wild discus. The female wild discuss will lay several hundred eggs and guard them until they hatch. Once they emerge, the young fish attach themselves to the sides of their parents for the first few weeks of their lives, feeding on a milky secretion produced by glands in the parents flanks.
Image ID: 13954  
Species: Wild discus, Symphysodon discus
 


Natural History Photography Blog posts (20) related to Egg



Alternative Search:



Related Topics:



Keywords:

Page:   ‹‹‹ Previous   1 2 3 4 -5-   New Search    Compact View
Categories Appearing Among These Images:
Animal  >  Bird  >  Albatross (Diomedeidae)  >  Black-Browed Albatross
Animal  >  Bird  >  Penguin  >  Gentoo Penguin
Animal  >  Bird  >  Penguin  >  King Penguin
Animal  >  Fish  >  Freshwater Fish
Animal  >  Fish  >  Marine Fish  >  Sculpin (Cottidae)
Animal  >  Fish  >  Marine Fish  >  Seahorse (Syngnathidae)
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Coral  >  Soft Coral  >  Gorgonian
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Marine Invertebrate Behavior  >  Reproduction / Mating
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Mollusk  >  Cephalopod  >  Squid
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Mollusk  >  Gastropods / Snail
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Plankton  >  Jellyfish
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Plankton  >  Salp
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Tunicates  >  Salp
Gallery  >  California
Gallery  >  Clipperton Island
Gallery  >  Falkland Islands
Gallery  >  Gorgonian
Gallery  >  Island
Gallery  >  Man And Animal
Gallery  >  New Work July 2011
Gallery  >  Pacific Northwest Marine Life
Gallery  >  Penguin
Gallery  >  South Georgia Island
Gallery  >  Squid
Location  >  Oceans  >  Atlantic  >  Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)
Location  >  Oceans  >  Atlantic  >  South Georgia Island
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)  >  Channel Islands  >  Catalina Island
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  Fiji Islands
Location  >  Oceans  >  Southern Ocean  >  Antarctica
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Marine Sanctuaries  >  Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary  >  Anacapa Island
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  Provincial Parks  >  Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park
Location  >  World  >  Antarctica  >  Antarctic Peninsula  >  Cuverville Island
Location  >  World  >  Canada  >  British Columbia  >  Adams River
Location  >  World  >  France  >  Clipperton Island
Location  >  World  >  United Kingdom  >  Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)  >  Steeple Jason Island
Location  >  World  >  United Kingdom  >  Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)  >  West Point Island
Location  >  World  >  United Kingdom  >  South Georgia Island  >  Salisbury Plain
Subject  >  People  >  Underwater  >  Freediver / Snorkler
Subject  >  People  >  Underwater  >  Photographer
Subject  >  Technique  >  Captivity  >  Aquarium
Subject  >  Technique  >  Underwater

Species Appearing Among These Images:
Aptenodytes patagonicus
Delonovolva aequalis
Hippocampus abdominalis
Hypsypops rubicundus
Loligo opalescens
Lophogorgia chilensis
Oncorhynchus nerka
Ostorhinchus aureus
Phacellophora camtschatica
Pygoscelis papua
Rhamphocottus richardsoni
Symphysodon discus
Thalassarche melanophrys

Natural History Photography Blog posts (20) related to Egg
A Sampling of Fiji Marine Creatures
Best Photos of 2011
Stock Photo Gallery: Penguins!
Sockeye Salmon Migrating Up The Adams River
Photography Travel Gear Checklist
Cloudy Morning in Paradise Bay, Antarctica
Salisbury Plain, South Georgia Island
Steeple Jason, West Falklands
Red Gorgonian, Lophogorgia chilensis
Back in the Saddle
Rose Atoll, A World Treasure in Peril
Kelp Forest Reminiscing
Vogelsang High Sierra Camp, Yosemite National Park
Silver Salmon Creek Lodge, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Photos of Eastern Fox Squirrels in Los Angeles
Photos of Sea Lions in La Jolla
Skip Stubbs in Thailand (2007)
Photos of La Jolla Brown Pelicans
Photos of Birch Aquarium, La Jolla
The Kelp Forest :: Part IV

Search for:     

Updated: November 29, 2020