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Komodo dragon, the worlds largest lizard, grows to 10 feet (3m) and over 500 pounds.  They have an acute sense of smell and are notorious meat-eaters.  The saliva of the Komodo dragon is deadly, an adaptation to help it more quickly consume its prey, Varanus komodoensis Komodo dragon, the worlds largest lizard, grows to 10 feet (3m) and over 500 pounds.  They have an acute sense of smell and are notorious meat-eaters.  The saliva of the Komodo dragon is deadly, an adaptation to help it more quickly consume its prey, Varanus komodoensis Komodo dragon, the worlds largest lizard, grows to 10 feet (3m) and over 500 pounds.  They have an acute sense of smell and are notorious meat-eaters.  The saliva of the Komodo dragon is deadly, an adaptation to help it more quickly consume its prey, Varanus komodoensis
Komodo dragon, the worlds largest lizard, grows to 10 feet (3m) and over 500 pounds. They have an acute sense of smell and are notorious meat-eaters. The saliva of the Komodo dragon is deadly, an adaptation to help it more quickly consume its prey.
Image ID: 12821  
Species: Komodo dragon, Varanus komodoensis
 
Komodo dragon, the worlds largest lizard, grows to 10 feet (3m) and over 500 pounds. They have an acute sense of smell and are notorious meat-eaters. The saliva of the Komodo dragon is deadly, an adaptation to help it more quickly consume its prey.
Image ID: 12822  
Species: Komodo dragon, Varanus komodoensis
 
Komodo dragon, the worlds largest lizard, grows to 10 feet (3m) and over 500 pounds. They have an acute sense of smell and are notorious meat-eaters. The saliva of the Komodo dragon is deadly, an adaptation to help it more quickly consume its prey.
Image ID: 12823  
Species: Komodo dragon, Varanus komodoensis
 
Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Image ID: 13956  
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
 
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Image ID: 13957  
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
 
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Image ID: 13958  
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
 
Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Image ID: 13959  
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
 
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Image ID: 13960  
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
 
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Image ID: 13961  
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
 
Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri Emerald tree boa.  Emerald tree boas are nocturnal, finding and striking birds and small mammals in complete darkness.  They have infrared heat receptors around their faces that allow them to locate warm blooded prey in the dark, sensitive to as little as 0.4 degrees of Fahrenheit temperature differences, Corralus caninus Emerald tree boa.  Emerald tree boas are nocturnal, finding and striking birds and small mammals in complete darkness.  They have infrared heat receptors around their faces that allow them to locate warm blooded prey in the dark, sensitive to as little as 0.4 degrees of Fahrenheit temperature differences, Corralus caninus
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Image ID: 13962  
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
 
Emerald tree boa. Emerald tree boas are nocturnal, finding and striking birds and small mammals in complete darkness. They have infrared heat receptors around their faces that allow them to locate warm blooded prey in the dark, sensitive to as little as 0.4 degrees of Fahrenheit temperature differences.
Image ID: 13965  
Species: Emerald tree boa, Corralus caninus
 
Emerald tree boa. Emerald tree boas are nocturnal, finding and striking birds and small mammals in complete darkness. They have infrared heat receptors around their faces that allow them to locate warm blooded prey in the dark, sensitive to as little as 0.4 degrees of Fahrenheit temperature differences.
Image ID: 13966  
Species: Emerald tree boa, Corralus caninus
 
Matamata turtle.  The fringed flaps along the head and neck of this unusual turtle look like weeds or algae and help the animal to stay camoflaged until prey swims by, Chelus fimbriata Port-and-starboard light fish.  The fish, also called pinecone fish, have two light organs that are housed in pits in their lower jaws.  The organs produce a greenish light that allows the fish to feed at night by luring small prey with their dim lights, Cleidopus gloriamaris Electric eel.  Like other members of the South American knifefish family, the electric eel relies on electrolocation to navigate in find food in murky water.  However, its electric organs are more powerful than its relatives, allowing it to produce sufficiently high voltage pulses to stun predators and prey, Electrophorus electricus
Matamata turtle. The fringed flaps along the head and neck of this unusual turtle look like weeds or algae and help the animal to stay camoflaged until prey swims by.
Image ID: 13972  
Species: Matamata, Chelus fimbriata
 
Port-and-starboard light fish. The fish, also called pinecone fish, have two light organs that are housed in pits in their lower jaws. The organs produce a greenish light that allows the fish to feed at night by luring small prey with their dim lights.
Image ID: 13973  
Species: Port-and-starboard light fish, Cleidopus gloriamaris
 
Electric eel. Like other members of the South American knifefish family, the electric eel relies on electrolocation to navigate in find food in murky water. However, its electric organs are more powerful than its relatives, allowing it to produce sufficiently high voltage pulses to stun predators and prey.
Image ID: 13989  
Species: Electric eel, Electrophorus electricus
 
Frogfish, unidentified species.  The frogfish is a master of camoflage, lying in wait, motionless, until prey swims near, then POW lightning quick the frogfish gulps it down Frogfish, unidentified species.  The frogfish is a master of camoflage, lying in wait, motionless, until prey swims near, then POW lightning quick the frogfish gulps it down Frogfish, unidentified species.  The frogfish is a master of camoflage, lying in wait, motionless, until prey swims near, then POW lightning quick the frogfish gulps it down
Frogfish, unidentified species. The frogfish is a master of camoflage, lying in wait, motionless, until prey swims near, then POW lightning quick the frogfish gulps it down.
Image ID: 14511  
 
Frogfish, unidentified species. The frogfish is a master of camoflage, lying in wait, motionless, until prey swims near, then POW lightning quick the frogfish gulps it down.
Image ID: 14512  
 
Frogfish, unidentified species. The frogfish is a master of camoflage, lying in wait, motionless, until prey swims near, then POW lightning quick the frogfish gulps it down.
Image ID: 14513  
 
Frogfish, unidentified species.  The frogfish is a master of camoflage, lying in wait, motionless, until prey swims near, then POW lightning quick the frogfish gulps it down Frogfish, unidentified species.  The frogfish is a master of camoflage, lying in wait, motionless, until prey swims near, then POW lightning quick the frogfish gulps it down Frogfish, unidentified species.  The frogfish is a master of camoflage, lying in wait, motionless, until prey swims near, then POW lightning quick the frogfish gulps it down
Frogfish, unidentified species. The frogfish is a master of camoflage, lying in wait, motionless, until prey swims near, then POW lightning quick the frogfish gulps it down.
Image ID: 14514  
 
Frogfish, unidentified species. The frogfish is a master of camoflage, lying in wait, motionless, until prey swims near, then POW lightning quick the frogfish gulps it down.
Image ID: 14515  
 
Frogfish, unidentified species. The frogfish is a master of camoflage, lying in wait, motionless, until prey swims near, then POW lightning quick the frogfish gulps it down.
Image ID: 14516  
 
Brown pelican preening.  After wiping its long beak on the uropygial gland near the base of its tail, the pelican spreads the preen oil on feathers about its body, helping to keep them water resistant, an important protection for a bird that spends much of its life diving in the ocean for prey, Pelecanus occidentalis, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus, La Jolla, California Brown pelican preening.  After wiping its long beak on the uropygial gland near the base of its tail, the pelican spreads the preen oil on feathers about its body, helping to keep them water resistant, an important protection for a bird that spends much of its life diving in the ocean for prey, Pelecanus occidentalis, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus, La Jolla, California Brown pelican preening.  After wiping its long beak on the uropygial gland near the base of its tail, the pelican spreads the preen oil on feathers about its body, helping to keep them water resistant, an important protection for a bird that spends much of its life diving in the ocean for prey, Pelecanus occidentalis, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus, La Jolla, California
Brown pelican preening. After wiping its long beak on the uropygial gland near the base of its tail, the pelican spreads the preen oil on feathers about its body, helping to keep them water resistant, an important protection for a bird that spends much of its life diving in the ocean for prey.
Image ID: 15157  
Species: Brown Pelican, Pelecanus occidentalis, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus
Location: La Jolla, California, USA
 
Brown pelican preening. After wiping its long beak on the uropygial gland near the base of its tail, the pelican spreads the preen oil on feathers about its body, helping to keep them water resistant, an important protection for a bird that spends much of its life diving in the ocean for prey.
Image ID: 18343  
Species: Brown Pelican, Pelecanus occidentalis, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus
Location: La Jolla, California, USA
 
Brown pelican preening. After wiping its long beak on the uropygial gland near the base of its tail, the pelican spreads the preen oil on feathers about its body, helping to keep them water resistant, an important protection for a bird that spends much of its life diving in the ocean for prey.
Image ID: 18381  
Species: Brown Pelican, Pelecanus occidentalis, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus
Location: La Jolla, California, USA
 
Brown pelican preening.  After wiping its long beak on the uropygial gland near the base of its tail, the pelican spreads the preen oil on feathers about its body, helping to keep them water resistant, an important protection for a bird that spends much of its life diving in the ocean for prey, Pelecanus occidentalis, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus, La Jolla, California This photo is the top of a stack of similar images, click to see them all. A bull sea lion shows a brand burned into its hide by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to monitor it from season to season as it travels between California, Oregon and Washington.  Some California sea lions, such as this one C-704, prey upon migrating salmon that gather in the downstream waters and fish ladders of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River.  The "C" in its brand denotes Columbia River. These  sea lions also form bachelor colonies that haul out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin and elsewhere, where they can damage or even sink docks, Zalophus californianus A bull sea lion shows a brand burned into its hide by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to monitor it from season to season as it travels between California, Oregon and Washington.  Some California sea lions, such as this one C-704, prey upon migrating salmon that gather in the downstream waters and fish ladders of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River.  The "C" in its brand denotes Columbia River. These  sea lions also form bachelor colonies that haul out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin and elsewhere, where they can damage or even sink docks, Zalophus californianus
Brown pelican preening. After wiping its long beak on the uropygial gland near the base of its tail, the pelican spreads the preen oil on feathers about its body, helping to keep them water resistant, an important protection for a bird that spends much of its life diving in the ocean for prey.
Image ID: 18383  
Species: Brown Pelican, Pelecanus occidentalis, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus
Location: La Jolla, California, USA
 
A bull sea lion shows a brand burned into its hide by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to monitor it from season to season as it travels between California, Oregon and Washington. Some California sea lions, such as this one C-704, prey upon migrating salmon that gather in the downstream waters and fish ladders of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. The "C" in its brand denotes Columbia River. These sea lions also form bachelor colonies that haul out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin and elsewhere, where they can damage or even sink docks.
Image ID: 19430  
Species: California sea lion, Zalophus californianus
Location: Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon, USA
 
A bull sea lion shows a brand burned into its hide by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to monitor it from season to season as it travels between California, Oregon and Washington. Some California sea lions, such as this one C-704, prey upon migrating salmon that gather in the downstream waters and fish ladders of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. The "C" in its brand denotes Columbia River. These sea lions also form bachelor colonies that haul out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin and elsewhere, where they can damage or even sink docks.
Image ID: 19433  
Species: California sea lion, Zalophus californianus
Location: Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon, USA
 
A bull sea lion shows a brand burned into its hide by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to monitor it from season to season as it travels between California, Oregon and Washington.  Some California sea lions, such as this one C-520, prey upon migrating salmon that gather in the downstream waters and fish ladders of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River.  The "C" in its brand denotes Columbia River. These  sea lions also form bachelor colonies that haul out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin and elsewhere, where they can damage or even sink docks, Zalophus californianus A bull sea lion shows a brand burned into its hide by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to monitor it from season to season as it travels between California, Oregon and Washington.  Some California sea lions, such as this one C-704, prey upon migrating salmon that gather in the downstream waters and fish ladders of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River.  The "C" in its brand denotes Columbia River. These  sea lions also form bachelor colonies that haul out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin and elsewhere, where they can damage or even sink docks, Zalophus californianus
A bull sea lion shows a brand burned into its hide by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to monitor it from season to season as it travels between California, Oregon and Washington. Some California sea lions, such as this one C-520, prey upon migrating salmon that gather in the downstream waters and fish ladders of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. The "C" in its brand denotes Columbia River. These sea lions also form bachelor colonies that haul out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin and elsewhere, where they can damage or even sink docks.
Image ID: 19434  
Species: California sea lion, Zalophus californianus
Location: Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon, USA
 
A bull sea lion shows a brand burned into its hide by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to monitor it from season to season as it travels between California, Oregon and Washington. Some California sea lions, such as this one C-704, prey upon migrating salmon that gather in the downstream waters and fish ladders of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. The "C" in its brand denotes Columbia River. These sea lions also form bachelor colonies that haul out on public docks in Astoria's East Mooring Basin and elsewhere, where they can damage or even sink docks.
Image ID: 19441  
Species: California sea lion, Zalophus californianus
Location: Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon, USA
 


Natural History Photography Blog posts (20) related to Prey



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Categories Appearing Among These Images:
Animal  >  Bird  >  Pelican (Pelecanidae)  >  Brown Pelican
Animal  >  Bird  >  Pelican (Pelecanidae)  >  Brown Pelican  >  California Brown Pelican
Animal  >  Bird  >  Penguin  >  Gentoo Penguin
Animal  >  Bird  >  Penguin  >  Magellanic Penguin
Animal  >  Bird  >  Seabird
Animal  >  Bird  >  Seabird  >  Seabird Behavior  >  Preening
Animal  >  Endangered / Threatened Species  >  Marine  >  Blue Whale
Animal  >  Endangered / Threatened Species  >  Marine  >  Great White Shark
Animal  >  Endangered / Threatened Species  >  Seabird  >  California Brown Pelican
Animal  >  Fish
Animal  >  Fish  >  Fish Anatomy  >  Electric
Animal  >  Fish  >  Fish Behavior  >  Defense
Animal  >  Fish  >  Freshwater Fish
Animal  >  Fish  >  Freshwater Fish  >  Piranha
Animal  >  Fish  >  Freshwater Fish  >  South America
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Bear  >  Brown Bear
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Bear  >  Grizzly Bear
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Coyote
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Leopard
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Otter  >  Sea Otter
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Serval Cat
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Anemone
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Crustacean  >  Krill
Animal  >  Pinniped  >  California Sea Lion
Animal  >  Shark  >  Blue Shark
Animal  >  Shark  >  Great White Shark
Animal  >  Shark  >  Hammerhead Shark  >  Scalloped Hammerhead
Gallery  >  Bird
Gallery  >  Blue Shark
Gallery  >  Blue Whales
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Gallery  >  California Sea Lion
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Gallery  >  Icon
Gallery  >  Kenya Safari
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Gallery  >  Meru National Park
Gallery  >  New Work August 2011
Gallery  >  New Work October 2011
Gallery  >  New Work September 2013
Gallery  >  Olare Orok Conservancy
Gallery  >  Penguin
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Gallery  >  Travel
Gallery  >  Wildlife Portraits
Location  >  Oceans  >  Atlantic  >  Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)  >  Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  Cocos Island National Park (Costa Rica)  >  Underwater
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  Galapagos Islands (Ecuador)  >  Underwater
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  International  >  Isla Guadalupe Special Biosphere Reserve (Mexico)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Marine Sanctuaries  >  Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (California)  >  Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Lake Clark National Park (Alaska)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Wildlife Refuges  >  Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  World Heritage Sites  >  Cocos Island National Park (Costa Rica)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  World Heritage Sites  >  Galapagos Islands (Ecuador)
Location  >  USA  >  Alaska  >  Lake Clark National Park
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  Moss Landing  >  Elkhorn Slough
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  San Diego  >  La Jolla  >  La Jolla Pelicans
Location  >  USA  >  New Mexico  >  Socorro  >  Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge
Location  >  USA  >  Oregon  >  Astoria
Location  >  World  >  Costa Rica  >  Cocos Island (Isla del Coco)
Location  >  World  >  Ecuador  >  Galapagos Islands  >  Wolf Island (Wenman)
Location  >  World  >  Kenya  >  Amboseli National Park
Location  >  World  >  Kenya  >  Maasai Mara National Reserve
Location  >  World  >  Kenya  >  Meru National Park
Location  >  World  >  Mexico  >  Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)
Location  >  World  >  United Kingdom  >  Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)  >  Carcass Island
Location  >  World  >  United Kingdom  >  Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)  >  New Island
Location  >  World  >  United Kingdom  >  Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)  >  Steeple Jason Island
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Subject  >  Technique  >  Captivity  >  Aquarium

Species Appearing Among These Images:
Anthopleura elegantissima
Canis latrans
Canis mesomelas
Carcharodon carcharias
Chelus fimbriata
Cleidopus gloriamaris
Corralus caninus
Crotalus pricei
Electrophorus electricus
Enhydra lutris
Euphausia pacifica
Leptailurus serval
Loligo opalescens
Panthera pardus
Pelecanus occidentalis
Pelecanus occidentalis californicus
Phalcoboenus australis
Prionace glauca
Pygocentrus nattereri
Pygoscelis papua
Sagittarius serpentarius
Spheniscus magellanicus
Sphyrna lewini
Thelotornis capensis oatesii
Ursus arctos
Varanus komodoensis
Zalophus californianus

Natural History Photography Blog posts (20) related to Prey
Killer Whales (Orca) attacking California Sea Lion
New Work - September 2013
Seabird Entanglement in Plastic
Fortuna Bay, South Georgia Island
Steeple Jason, West Falklands
Bald Eagle Catches a Fish, Alaska
Pelican Entangled in Plastic Bag
Best Photos of 2008
Coyote, Bosque del Apache
Sea Otter Photos
Best Photos of 2007
Photo of Elk Flehmen Response
Photo of a Coyote Hunting Voles
Great White Shark Eyes The Camera
Great White Shark Photo
Wolf Island, Galapagos
Photographing Pelicans at the La Jolla Cliffs
Blue Shark Photo
Galapagos Photos
Ecology Letters Cover

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Updated: January 19, 2020