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The General Grant Sequoia tree is the second-tallest living thing on earth, standing over 267 feet tall with a 40 diameter and 107 circumference at its base. It is estimated to be between 1500 and 2000 years old. The General Grant Sequoia is both the Nations Christmas tree and the only living National Shrine, memorializing veterans who served in the US armed forces. Grant Grove, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California The General Grant Sequoia tree is the second-tallest living thing on earth, standing over 267 feet tall with a 40 diameter and 107 circumference at its base. It is estimated to be between 1500 and 2000 years old. The General Grant Sequoia is both the Nations Christmas tree and the only living National Shrine, memorializing veterans who served in the US armed forces. Grant Grove, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California The General Grant Sequoia tree is the second-tallest living thing on earth, standing over 267 feet tall with a 40 diameter and 107 circumference at its base. It is estimated to be between 1500 and 2000 years old. The General Grant Sequoia is both the Nations Christmas tree and the only living National Shrine, memorializing veterans who served in the US armed forces. Grant Grove, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California
The General Grant Sequoia tree is the second-tallest living thing on earth, standing over 267 feet tall with a 40 diameter and 107 circumference at its base. It is estimated to be between 1500 and 2000 years old. The General Grant Sequoia is both the Nations Christmas tree and the only living National Shrine, memorializing veterans who served in the US armed forces. Grant Grove.
Image ID: 09866  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Grant Grove, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
The General Grant Sequoia tree is the second-tallest living thing on earth, standing over 267 feet tall with a 40 diameter and 107 circumference at its base. It is estimated to be between 1500 and 2000 years old. The General Grant Sequoia is both the Nations Christmas tree and the only living National Shrine, memorializing veterans who served in the US armed forces. Grant Grove.
Image ID: 09867  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Grant Grove, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
The General Grant Sequoia tree is the second-tallest living thing on earth, standing over 267 feet tall with a 40 diameter and 107 circumference at its base. It is estimated to be between 1500 and 2000 years old. The General Grant Sequoia is both the Nations Christmas tree and the only living National Shrine, memorializing veterans who served in the US armed forces. Grant Grove.
Image ID: 09868  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Grant Grove, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
The General Grant Sequoia tree is the second-tallest living thing on earth, standing over 267 feet tall with a 40 diameter and 107 circumference at its base. It is estimated to be between 1500 and 2000 years old. The General Grant Sequoia is both the Nations Christmas tree and the only living National Shrine, memorializing veterans who served in the US armed forces. Grant Grove, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California The General Grant Sequoia tree is the second-tallest living thing on earth, standing over 267 feet tall with a 40 diameter and 107 circumference at its base. It is estimated to be between 1500 and 2000 years old. The General Grant Sequoia is both the Nations Christmas tree and the only living National Shrine, memorializing veterans who served in the US armed forces. Grant Grove, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California The General Sherman Sequoia tree is the largest (most massive) living thing on earth, standing over 275 feet tall with a 36 diameter and 102 circumference at its base. Its volume is over 53,000 cubic feet. It is estimated to be 2300 to 2700 years old, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California
The General Grant Sequoia tree is the second-tallest living thing on earth, standing over 267 feet tall with a 40 diameter and 107 circumference at its base. It is estimated to be between 1500 and 2000 years old. The General Grant Sequoia is both the Nations Christmas tree and the only living National Shrine, memorializing veterans who served in the US armed forces. Grant Grove.
Image ID: 09869  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Grant Grove, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
The General Grant Sequoia tree is the second-tallest living thing on earth, standing over 267 feet tall with a 40 diameter and 107 circumference at its base. It is estimated to be between 1500 and 2000 years old. The General Grant Sequoia is both the Nations Christmas tree and the only living National Shrine, memorializing veterans who served in the US armed forces. Grant Grove.
Image ID: 09870  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Grant Grove, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
The General Sherman Sequoia tree is the largest (most massive) living thing on earth, standing over 275 feet tall with a 36 diameter and 102 circumference at its base. Its volume is over 53,000 cubic feet. It is estimated to be 2300 to 2700 years old.
Image ID: 09871  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
The General Sherman Sequoia tree is the largest (most massive) living thing on earth, standing over 275 feet tall with a 36 diameter and 102 circumference at its base. Its volume is over 53,000 cubic feet. It is estimated to be 2300 to 2700 years old, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California The Tennessee Tree shows resilience to fire damage, continuing to thrive in spite of deep fire scars. The living tissue or cambium layer of a sequoia lies just under its bark. As long as some of this thin, living tissue connects the leaves above with the roots below, the tree will continue to live. If undisturbed by people, or more fire, this living layer will eventually heal the fire scars seen on this tree. Grant Grove, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California The President, an enormous Sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California
The General Sherman Sequoia tree is the largest (most massive) living thing on earth, standing over 275 feet tall with a 36 diameter and 102 circumference at its base. Its volume is over 53,000 cubic feet. It is estimated to be 2300 to 2700 years old.
Image ID: 09872  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
The Tennessee Tree shows resilience to fire damage, continuing to thrive in spite of deep fire scars. The living tissue or cambium layer of a sequoia lies just under its bark. As long as some of this thin, living tissue connects the leaves above with the roots below, the tree will continue to live. If undisturbed by people, or more fire, this living layer will eventually heal the fire scars seen on this tree. Grant Grove.
Image ID: 09873  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Grant Grove, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
The President, an enormous Sequoia tree.
Image ID: 09874  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
Chief Sequoyah, an enormous Sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California A young hiker is dwarfed by the enormous Senate Group of Sequoia trees, part of the Congress trail, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California A young hiker is dwarfed by the trunk of an enormous Sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California
Chief Sequoyah, an enormous Sequoia tree.
Image ID: 09875  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
A young hiker is dwarfed by the enormous Senate Group of Sequoia trees, part of the Congress trail.
Image ID: 09876  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
A young hiker is dwarfed by the trunk of an enormous Sequoia tree.
Image ID: 09877  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
A young hiker is dwarfed by the trunk of an enormous Sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California A young hiker is dwarfed by the trunk of an enormous Sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California The General Lee, an enormous Sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California
A young hiker is dwarfed by the trunk of an enormous Sequoia tree.
Image ID: 09878  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
A young hiker is dwarfed by the trunk of an enormous Sequoia tree.
Image ID: 09880  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
The General Lee, an enormous Sequoia tree.
Image ID: 09881  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
The General Lee, an enormous Sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California The cone of a Sequoia tree is surprisingly small, given the enormity of the tree itself. Once the cone has fallen to the forest floor, fire will cause the seeds to be released from the cone. In this way fire actually aids in the creation of a healthy Sequoia grove, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California The cone of a Sequoia tree is surprisingly small, given the enormity of the tree itself. Once the cone has fallen to the forest floor, fire will cause the seeds to be released from the cone. In this way fire actually aids in the creation of a healthy Sequoia grove, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California
The General Lee, an enormous Sequoia tree.
Image ID: 09882  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
The cone of a Sequoia tree is surprisingly small, given the enormity of the tree itself. Once the cone has fallen to the forest floor, fire will cause the seeds to be released from the cone. In this way fire actually aids in the creation of a healthy Sequoia grove.
Image ID: 09883  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
The cone of a Sequoia tree is surprisingly small, given the enormity of the tree itself. Once the cone has fallen to the forest floor, fire will cause the seeds to be released from the cone. In this way fire actually aids in the creation of a healthy Sequoia grove.
Image ID: 09884  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
Huge Sequoia trees reach for the sky, creating a canopy of branches hundreds of feet above the forest floor, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California Huge Sequoia trees reach for the sky, creating a canopy of branches hundreds of feet above the forest floor, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California Fire damage is apparent on the bark of this large Sequoia tree. Its fibrous, fire-resistant bark, 2 feet or more in thickness on some Sequoias, helps protect the giant trees from more severe damage during fires, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California
Huge Sequoia trees reach for the sky, creating a canopy of branches hundreds of feet above the forest floor.
Image ID: 09885  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
Huge Sequoia trees reach for the sky, creating a canopy of branches hundreds of feet above the forest floor.
Image ID: 09886  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
Fire damage is apparent on the bark of this large Sequoia tree. Its fibrous, fire-resistant bark, 2 feet or more in thickness on some Sequoias, helps protect the giant trees from more severe damage during fires.
Image ID: 09887  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
Huge Sequoia trees reach for the sky, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California Ferns carpet the forest floor next to a fallen Sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California Ferns carpet the forest floor next to a fallen Sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California
Huge Sequoia trees reach for the sky.
Image ID: 09888  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
Ferns carpet the forest floor next to a fallen Sequoia tree.
Image ID: 09889  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
Ferns carpet the forest floor next to a fallen Sequoia tree.
Image ID: 09890  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Giant Forest, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
Huge Sequoia trees reach for the sky. Grant Grove, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California Huge Sequoia trees reach for the sky. Grant Grove, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California Huge Sequoia trees reach for the sky. Grant Grove, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California
Huge Sequoia trees reach for the sky. Grant Grove.
Image ID: 09891  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Grant Grove, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
Huge Sequoia trees reach for the sky. Grant Grove.
Image ID: 09892  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Grant Grove, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
Huge Sequoia trees reach for the sky. Grant Grove.
Image ID: 09893  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Grant Grove, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 
Aspen trees in fall, change in color to yellow, orange and red, reflected in the calm waters of North Lake, Paiute Peak rising to the right, Populus tremuloides, Bishop Creek Canyon, Sierra Nevada Mountains Aspen trees in fall, change in color to yellow, orange and red, reflected in the calm waters of North Lake, Paiute Peak rising to the right, Populus tremuloides, Bishop Creek Canyon, Sierra Nevada Mountains
Aspen trees in fall, change in color to yellow, orange and red, reflected in the calm waters of North Lake, Paiute Peak rising to the right.
Image ID: 23373  
Species: Aspen, Populus tremuloides
Location: Bishop Creek Canyon, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, USA
 
Aspen trees in fall, change in color to yellow, orange and red, reflected in the calm waters of North Lake, Paiute Peak rising to the right.
Image ID: 23381  
Species: Aspen, Populus tremuloides
Location: Bishop Creek Canyon, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, USA
 
Buckskin Gulch hiker.  A hiker moves through the deep narrow passages of Buckskin Gulch, a slot canyon cut deep into sandstone by years of river-induced erosion.  In some places the Buckskin Gulch narrows are only about 15 feet wide but several hundred feet high, blocking sunlight.  Flash floods are dangerous as there is no escape once into the Buckskin Gulch slot canyons.  This is a panorama made of twelve individual photos, Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness, Arizona
Buckskin Gulch hiker. A hiker moves through the deep narrow passages of Buckskin Gulch, a slot canyon cut deep into sandstone by years of river-induced erosion. In some places the Buckskin Gulch narrows are only about 15 feet wide but several hundred feet high, blocking sunlight. Flash floods are dangerous as there is no escape once into the Buckskin Gulch slot canyons. This is a panorama made of twelve individual photos.
Image ID: 20704  
Location: Buckskin Gulch, Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness, Arizona, USA
Pano dimensions: 4571 x 14354
 


Natural History Photography Blog posts (20) related to Red Canyon



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Categories Appearing Among These Images:
Gallery  >  Anza Borrego Desert State Park
Gallery  >  Arizona
Gallery  >  Buckskin Gulch
Gallery  >  California
Gallery  >  Canyonlands National Park
Gallery  >  Fall Colors
Gallery  >  Landscape
Gallery  >  Natural Arches
Gallery  >  Olympic National Park
Gallery  >  Panorama
Gallery  >  Utah
Gallery  >  Waterfalls
Gallery  >  Zion National Park
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Forests  >  Dixie National Forest (Utah)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Canyonlands National Park (Utah)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Canyonlands National Park (Utah)  >  Mesa Arch
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Olympic National Park (Washington)  >  Sol Duc Falls
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Sequoia / Kings Canyon National Park (California)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Vermilion Cliffs National Monument
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming)  >  River / Waterfall  >  Lower Yellowstone Falls
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Zion National Park (Utah)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  State Parks  >  Anza Borrego Desert State Park
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  State Parks  >  Valley of Fire State Park (Nevada)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  World Heritage Sites  >  Yellowstone National Park (USA)
Location  >  USA  >  Arizona  >  Paria Canyon/Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness  >  Buckskin Gulch
Location  >  USA  >  Arizona  >  Paria Canyon/Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness  >  Wire Pass
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  Bishop  >  Bishop Creek Canyon  >  North Lake
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  Desert  >  Anza Borrego
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  Rock Creek Canyon
Location  >  USA  >  Nevada  >  Valley of Fire State Park
Location  >  USA  >  Utah
Location  >  USA  >  Utah  >  Canyonlands National Park
Location  >  USA  >  Utah  >  Zion National Park
Location  >  USA  >  Washington  >  Olympic National Park
Location  >  USA  >  Wyoming  >  Yellowstone National Park
Natural World  >  Geologic Features  >  Hoodoos
Natural World  >  Geologic Features  >  Natural Arches  >  Mesa Arch (Canyonlands National Park)
Natural World  >  Geologic Features  >  Natural Arches  >  Zion Arch (Zion National Park)
Natural World  >  Waterfall  >  Lower Yellowstone Falls (Yellowstone)
Natural World  >  Waterfall  >  Sinawava Falls (Zion)
Natural World  >  Waterfall  >  Sol Duc Falls (Olympic)
Plant  >  Cactus
Plant  >  Terrestrial Plant  >  Tree  >  Aspen Tree  >  Quaking Aspen
Plant  >  Terrestrial Plant  >  Tree  >  Redwood Tree  >  Sequoia Tree
Plant  >  Terrestrial Plant  >  Tree  >  Redwood Tree  >  Sequoia Tree  >  General Grant Sequoia Tree
Plant  >  Terrestrial Plant  >  Tree  >  Redwood Tree  >  Sequoia Tree  >  General Sherman Sequoia Tree
Plant  >  Terrestrial Plant  >  Tree  >  Redwood Tree  >  Sequoia Tree  >  Robert E Lee Sequoia Tree
Plant  >  Terrestrial Plant  >  Tree  >  Redwood Tree  >  Sequoia Tree  >  Senate Group of Sequoia Trees
Plant  >  Wildflower  >  Desert Wildflower
Subject  >  Technique  >  High Dynamic Range (HDR)
Subject  >  Technique  >  Panoramic Photo
Subject  >  Weird  >  Self Portrait

Species Appearing Among These Images:
Encelia farinosa
Ferocactus cylindraceus
Fouquieria splendens
Populus tremuloides
Sequoiadendron giganteum

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Updated: November 18, 2019