Search results for Shells


‹‹‹ Previous    1 -2- 3 4 5    Next ›››

Home   >   Natural History Photography Blog   >   Search   >   Shells
Thorny oyster or spiny oyster, Spondylus Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground.  Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground.  Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Thorny oyster or spiny oyster.
Image ID: 12980  
Species: Thorny oyster, Spondylus
 
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13418  
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13420  
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground.  Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground.  Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Castle Geyser (during steam phase, not eruption) with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13421  
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13425  
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Castle Geyser (during steam phase, not eruption) with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13427  
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13428  
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13429  
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Tortoise Shell Spring bubbles in front of the sinter cone of Castle Geyser. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13430  
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground.  Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground.  Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground.  Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes.  While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13437  
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13443  
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Castle Geyser erupts with the colorful bacteria mats of Tortoise Shell Spring in the foreground. Castle Geyser reaches 60 to 90 feet in height and lasts 20 minutes. While Castle Geyser has a 12 foot sinter cone that took 5,000 to 15,000 years to form, it is in fact situated atop geyserite terraces that themselves may have taken 200,000 years to form, making it likely the oldest active geyser in the park. Upper Geyser Basin.
Image ID: 13444  
Location: Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Shell Spring (Shell Geyser) erupts almost continuously.   The geysers opening resembles the two halves of a bivalve seashell, hence its name.  Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Shell Spring (Shell Geyser) erupts almost continuously.   The geysers opening resembles the two halves of a bivalve seashell, hence its name.  Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Hermit crab. Hermit crabs wear shells to protect their soft abdomens, which are asymmetrical and curved to fit the spiral shape of their shell. Like all crabs, hermit crabs are decapods; they have five pairs of legs, including a pair of claws. One claw is much larger than the other, the hermit crab uses it for defense and food shredding while it uses the smaller claw for eating. The second and third pairs of legs help the crab walk, and the last two pairs hold the hermit crab in its shell, Pagurus
Shell Spring (Shell Geyser) erupts almost continuously. The geysers opening resembles the two halves of a bivalve seashell, hence its name. Biscuit Basin.
Image ID: 13498  
Location: Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Shell Spring (Shell Geyser) erupts almost continuously. The geysers opening resembles the two halves of a bivalve seashell, hence its name. Biscuit Basin.
Image ID: 13499  
Location: Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Hermit crab. Hermit crabs wear shells to protect their soft abdomens, which are asymmetrical and curved to fit the spiral shape of their shell. Like all crabs, hermit crabs are decapods; they have five pairs of legs, including a pair of claws. One claw is much larger than the other, the hermit crab uses it for defense and food shredding while it uses the smaller claw for eating. The second and third pairs of legs help the crab walk, and the last two pairs hold the hermit crab in its shell.
Image ID: 13693  
Species: Hermit crab, Pagurus
 
Grunt sculpin.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Grunt sculpin poised in a barnacle shell.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Grunt sculpin poised in a barnacle shell.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
Grunt sculpin. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13724  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin poised in a barnacle shell. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13725  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin poised in a barnacle shell. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13726  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Grunt sculpin.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Grunt sculpin.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
Grunt sculpin. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13727  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13728  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13729  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Grunt sculpin.  Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself, Rhamphocottus richardsoni Gooseneck barnacles, exposed at low tide, adhere to a rock.  The shell, or capitulum, of the gooseneck barnacle grows to be about two inches long. It is made up of small plates, which enclose its soft body. Inside the shell, the barnacle primarily consists of long segmented legs, intestines and stomach, Pollicipes polymerus, Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park, Washington
Grunt sculpin. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13730  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Grunt sculpin. Grunt sculpin have evolved into its strange shape to fit within a giant barnacle shell perfectly, using the shell to protect its eggs and itself.
Image ID: 13731  
Species: Grunt sculpin, Rhamphocottus richardsoni
 
Gooseneck barnacles, exposed at low tide, adhere to a rock. The shell, or capitulum, of the gooseneck barnacle grows to be about two inches long. It is made up of small plates, which enclose its soft body. Inside the shell, the barnacle primarily consists of long segmented legs, intestines and stomach.
Image ID: 13779  
Species: Gooseneck barnacle, Pollicipes polymerus
Location: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park, Washington, USA
 
Gooseneck barnacles, exposed at low tide, adhere to a rock.  The shell, or capitulum, of the gooseneck barnacle grows to be about two inches long. It is made up of small plates, which enclose its soft body. Inside the shell, the barnacle primarily consists of long segmented legs, intestines and stomach, Pollicipes polymerus, Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park, Washington Softshell turtle.  Buried in sand, just the head of this softshell turtle is visible, Apalone spinifera Box turtle.  Box turtles are famous for their hinged shells, which allow them to retract almost completely into their bony armor, Terrapene
Gooseneck barnacles, exposed at low tide, adhere to a rock. The shell, or capitulum, of the gooseneck barnacle grows to be about two inches long. It is made up of small plates, which enclose its soft body. Inside the shell, the barnacle primarily consists of long segmented legs, intestines and stomach.
Image ID: 13798  
Species: Gooseneck barnacle, Pollicipes polymerus
Location: Ruby Beach, Olympic National Park, Washington, USA
 
Softshell turtle. Buried in sand, just the head of this softshell turtle is visible.
Image ID: 13971  
Species: Softshell turtle, Apalone spinifera
 
Box turtle. Box turtles are famous for their hinged shells, which allow them to retract almost completely into their bony armor.
Image ID: 13987  
Species: Box turtle, Terrapene
 
Box turtle.  Box turtles are famous for their hinged shells, which allow them to retract almost completely into their bony armor, Terrapene Chestnut cowry, mantle exposed to completely cover the hard exterior shell, Cypraea spadicea Hermit crab in olive shell, Pagurus granosimanus, Olivella biplicata, Monterey, California
Box turtle. Box turtles are famous for their hinged shells, which allow them to retract almost completely into their bony armor.
Image ID: 13988  
Species: Box turtle, Terrapene
 
Chestnut cowry, mantle exposed to completely cover the hard exterior shell.
Image ID: 14020  
Species: Chestnut Cowrie, Date Cowrie, Cypraea spadicea
 
Hermit crab in olive shell.
Image ID: 01033  
Species: Hermit crab, Pagurus granosimanus, Olivella biplicata
Location: Monterey, California, USA
 


Natural History Photography Blog posts (13) related to Shells



Related Topics:



Keywords:

Page:   ‹‹‹ Previous   1 -2- 3 4 5   Next ›››   New Search
Categories Appearing Among These Images:
Animal  >  Fish  >  Marine Fish  >  Sculpin (Cottidae)
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Otter  >  Sea Otter
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Crustacean  >  Crab
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Marine Invertebrate Anatomy  >  Mantle
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Marine Invertebrate Anatomy  >  Shell
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Mollusk  >  Gastropods / Snail
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Mollusk  >  Gastropods / Snail  >  Abalone
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Mollusk  >  Gastropods / Snail  >  Cowrie
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Worms  >  Serpulid / Feather Duster
Gallery  >  Yellowstone National Park
Location  >  Oceans  >  Caribbean  >  Roatan / Bay Islands
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)  >  Channel Islands  >  San Miguel Island
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)  >  Coronado Islands
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)  >  Monterey Peninsula
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Marine Sanctuaries  >  Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary  >  San Miguel Island
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Marine Sanctuaries  >  Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (California)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Marine Sanctuaries  >  Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (California)  >  Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Olympic National Park (Washington)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming)  >  Geothermal Features  >  Geyser  >  Castle Geyser
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming)  >  Geothermal Features  >  Spring  >  Shell Spring
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming)  >  Geothermal Features  >  Spring  >  Tortoise Shell Spring
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  World Heritage Sites  >  Yellowstone National Park (USA)
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  Moss Landing  >  Elkhorn Slough
Location  >  USA  >  Washington  >  Olympic National Park
Location  >  USA  >  Wyoming  >  Yellowstone National Park
Location  >  World  >  Honduras
Location  >  World  >  Mexico  >  Coronado Islands
Natural World  >  Geothermal Features  >  Geyser
Natural World  >  Geothermal Features  >  Spring
Portfolio
Specimens  >  Shells
Specimens  >  Shells  >  Cones (Conus / Conidae)
Specimens  >  Shells  >  Cowries (Cypraea / Cypraeidae)
Specimens  >  Shells  >  Olives (Olividae)
Subject  >  Technique  >  Captivity  >  Aquarium
Subject  >  Technique  >  Underwater

Species Appearing Among These Images:
Apalone spinifera
Conus australis
Conus californicus
Conus gloriamaris
Conus mutabilis
Conus pseudosulcatus
Conus sponsalis
Conus tulipa
Conus vitulinus
Cyphoma gibbosum
Cypraea arabica grayana
Cypraea carneola crassa
Cypraea caurica dracaena corrosa
Cypraea cervinetta
Cypraea cribraria
Cypraea fimbriata durbanensis
Cypraea fuscodentata
Cypraea gangranosa reentsii
Cypraea granulata
Cypraea histrio
Cypraea lynx vanelli
Cypraea miliaris inocellata
Cypraea pallida
Cypraea scurra
Cypraea spadicea
Cypraea tigris
Enhydra lutris
Eudistylia polymorpha
Haliotis fulgens
Murex pecten
Oliva lignaria
Oliva lignaria cryptospira
Oliva lignaria fordi
Oliva mustellina
Olivella biplicata
Pagurus granosimanus
Pagurus sp.
Pollicipes polymerus
Rhamphocottus richardsoni
Spondylus sp.
Terrapene sp.

Natural History Photography Blog posts (13) related to Shells
Starlight and Moonlight on Little Corona, Newport Beach
Equipment List for Antarctica, South Georgia and Falklands
SEO For Photographers, Search Engine Optimization
Kelp Forest Reminiscing
Photo of Half Dome, Yosemite National Park
Sea Otter Photos
Silver Salmon Creek Lodge, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Photo of the Hand of Ozymandias
Photo of a Galapagos Tortoise
Western Gull, Larus occidentalis
Visiting Yellowstone National Park
Photo of Castle Geyser, Yellowstone National Park
The Kelp Forest :: Part I

Search for:     

Updated: November 13, 2019