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The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars.
Location: Big Pine, California
Image ID: 28796  
Panorama dimensions: 7153 x 11978
Radio telescope antenna, part of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) is a system of ten radio telescopes which are operated remotely from their Array Operations Center located in Socorro, New Mexico, as a part of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). These ten radio antennas work together as an array that forms the longest system in the world that uses very long baseline interferometry, Big Pine, California
Radio telescope antenna, part of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) is a system of ten radio telescopes which are operated remotely from their Array Operations Center located in Socorro, New Mexico, as a part of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). These ten radio antennas work together as an array that forms the longest system in the world that uses very long baseline interferometry.
Location: Big Pine, California
Image ID: 28787  
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars.
Location: Big Pine, California
Image ID: 28788  
Panorama dimensions: 5954 x 12875
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars.
Location: Big Pine, California
Image ID: 28793  
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars.
Location: Big Pine, California
Image ID: 28790  
Sunrise lights Telescope Peak as it rises over the salt flats of Badwater, Death Valley.  At 11,049 feet, Telescope Peak is the highest peak in the Panamint Range as well as the highest point in Death Valley National Park.  At 282 feet below sea level, Badwater is the lowest point in North America
Sunrise lights Telescope Peak as it rises over the salt flats of Badwater, Death Valley. At 11,049 feet, Telescope Peak is the highest peak in the Panamint Range as well as the highest point in Death Valley National Park. At 282 feet below sea level, Badwater is the lowest point in North America.
Location: Badwater, Death Valley National Park, California
Image ID: 20549  
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars.
Location: Big Pine, California
Image ID: 28789  
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars.
Location: Big Pine, California
Image ID: 28791  
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars.
Location: Big Pine, California
Image ID: 28792  
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars
The OVRO 40 meter Telescope, part of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory located near Big Pine, California, USA. The telescope is used to conduct interferometric observations along with the other telescopes in the observatory, as a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) station and as a single dish instrument. Its main focus today is on the monitoring of blazars.
Location: Big Pine, California
Image ID: 28794  
Radio telescope antenna, part of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) is a system of ten radio telescopes which are operated remotely from their Array Operations Center located in Socorro, New Mexico, as a part of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). These ten radio antennas work together as an array that forms the longest system in the world that uses very long baseline interferometry, Big Pine, California
Radio telescope antenna, part of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) is a system of ten radio telescopes which are operated remotely from their Array Operations Center located in Socorro, New Mexico, as a part of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). These ten radio antennas work together as an array that forms the longest system in the world that uses very long baseline interferometry.
Location: Big Pine, California
Image ID: 28795  
Sunrise lights Telescope Peak as it rises over the salt flats of Badwater, Death Valley.  At 11,049 feet, Telescope Peak is the highest peak in the Panamint Range as well as the highest point in Death Valley National Park.  At 282 feet below sea level, Badwater is the lowest point in North America
Sunrise lights Telescope Peak as it rises over the salt flats of Badwater, Death Valley. At 11,049 feet, Telescope Peak is the highest peak in the Panamint Range as well as the highest point in Death Valley National Park. At 282 feet below sea level, Badwater is the lowest point in North America.
Location: Badwater, Death Valley National Park, California
Image ID: 20550  
The Palomar Observatory, located in north San Diego County California, is owned and operated by the California Institute of Technology. The Observatory supports the research of the Caltech faculty, post-doctoral fellows and students, and the researchers at Caltechs collaborating institutions. Palomar Observatory is home to the historic Hale 200-inch telescope. Other facilities on the mountain include the 60-inch, 48-inch, 18-inch and the Snoop telescopes
The Palomar Observatory, located in north San Diego County California, is owned and operated by the California Institute of Technology. The Observatory supports the research of the Caltech faculty, post-doctoral fellows and students, and the researchers at Caltechs collaborating institutions. Palomar Observatory is home to the historic Hale 200-inch telescope. Other facilities on the mountain include the 60-inch, 48-inch, 18-inch and the Snoop telescopes.
Location: Palomar Observatory, San Diego, California
Image ID: 12699  
The Palomar Observatory, located in north San Diego County California, is owned and operated by the California Institute of Technology. The Observatory supports the research of the Caltech faculty, post-doctoral fellows and students, and the researchers at Caltechs collaborating institutions. Palomar Observatory is home to the historic Hale 200-inch telescope. Other facilities on the mountain include the 60-inch, 48-inch, 18-inch and the Snoop telescopes
The Palomar Observatory, located in north San Diego County California, is owned and operated by the California Institute of Technology. The Observatory supports the research of the Caltech faculty, post-doctoral fellows and students, and the researchers at Caltechs collaborating institutions. Palomar Observatory is home to the historic Hale 200-inch telescope. Other facilities on the mountain include the 60-inch, 48-inch, 18-inch and the Snoop telescopes.
Location: Palomar Observatory, San Diego, California
Image ID: 12700  
The Palomar Observatory, located in north San Diego County California, is owned and operated by the California Institute of Technology. The Observatory supports the research of the Caltech faculty, post-doctoral fellows and students, and the researchers at Caltechs collaborating institutions. Palomar Observatory is home to the historic Hale 200-inch telescope. Other facilities on the mountain include the 60-inch, 48-inch, 18-inch and the Snoop telescopes
The Palomar Observatory, located in north San Diego County California, is owned and operated by the California Institute of Technology. The Observatory supports the research of the Caltech faculty, post-doctoral fellows and students, and the researchers at Caltechs collaborating institutions. Palomar Observatory is home to the historic Hale 200-inch telescope. Other facilities on the mountain include the 60-inch, 48-inch, 18-inch and the Snoop telescopes.
Location: Palomar Observatory, San Diego, California
Image ID: 12701  
The Palomar Observatory, located in north San Diego County California, is owned and operated by the California Institute of Technology. The Observatory supports the research of the Caltech faculty, post-doctoral fellows and students, and the researchers at Caltechs collaborating institutions. Palomar Observatory is home to the historic Hale 200-inch telescope. Other facilities on the mountain include the 60-inch, 48-inch, 18-inch and the Snoop telescopes
The Palomar Observatory, located in north San Diego County California, is owned and operated by the California Institute of Technology. The Observatory supports the research of the Caltech faculty, post-doctoral fellows and students, and the researchers at Caltechs collaborating institutions. Palomar Observatory is home to the historic Hale 200-inch telescope. Other facilities on the mountain include the 60-inch, 48-inch, 18-inch and the Snoop telescopes.
Location: Palomar Observatory, San Diego, California
Image ID: 12702  
The Palomar Observatory, located in north San Diego County California, is owned and operated by the California Institute of Technology. The Observatory supports the research of the Caltech faculty, post-doctoral fellows and students, and the researchers at Caltechs collaborating institutions. Palomar Observatory is home to the historic Hale 200-inch telescope. Other facilities on the mountain include the 60-inch, 48-inch, 18-inch and the Snoop telescopes
The Palomar Observatory, located in north San Diego County California, is owned and operated by the California Institute of Technology. The Observatory supports the research of the Caltech faculty, post-doctoral fellows and students, and the researchers at Caltechs collaborating institutions. Palomar Observatory is home to the historic Hale 200-inch telescope. Other facilities on the mountain include the 60-inch, 48-inch, 18-inch and the Snoop telescopes.
Location: Palomar Observatory, San Diego, California
Image ID: 12703  
Sunrise lights Telescope Peak as it rises over the salt flats of Badwater, Death Valley.  At 11,049 feet, Telescope Peak is the highest peak in the Panamint Range as well as the highest point in Death Valley National Park.  At 282 feet below sea level, Badwater is the lowest point in North America
Sunrise lights Telescope Peak as it rises over the salt flats of Badwater, Death Valley. At 11,049 feet, Telescope Peak is the highest peak in the Panamint Range as well as the highest point in Death Valley National Park. At 282 feet below sea level, Badwater is the lowest point in North America.
Location: Badwater, Death Valley National Park, California
Image ID: 20597  
Sunrise lights Telescope Peak as it rises over the salt flats of Badwater, Death Valley.  At 11,049 feet, Telescope Peak is the highest peak in the Panamint Range as well as the highest point in Death Valley National Park.  At 282 feet below sea level, Badwater is the lowest point in North America
Sunrise lights Telescope Peak as it rises over the salt flats of Badwater, Death Valley. At 11,049 feet, Telescope Peak is the highest peak in the Panamint Range as well as the highest point in Death Valley National Park. At 282 feet below sea level, Badwater is the lowest point in North America.
Location: Badwater, Death Valley National Park, California
Image ID: 20598  
Sunrise lights Telescope Peak as it rises over the salt flats of Badwater, Death Valley.  At 11,049 feet, Telescope Peak is the highest peak in the Panamint Range as well as the highest point in Death Valley National Park.  At 282 feet below sea level, Badwater is the lowest point in North America
Sunrise lights Telescope Peak as it rises over the salt flats of Badwater, Death Valley. At 11,049 feet, Telescope Peak is the highest peak in the Panamint Range as well as the highest point in Death Valley National Park. At 282 feet below sea level, Badwater is the lowest point in North America.
Location: Badwater, Death Valley National Park, California
Image ID: 20603