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Male elephant seals (bulls) rear up on their foreflippers and fight in the surf for access for mating females that are in estrous.  Such fighting among elephant seals can take place on the beach or in the water.  They bite and tear at each other on the neck and shoulders, drawing blood and creating scars on the tough hides, Mirounga angustirostris, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon, California Male elephant seals (bulls) rear up on their foreflippers and fight for territory and harems of females.  Bull elephant seals will haul out and fight from December through March, nearly fasting the entire time as they maintain their territory and harem.  They bite and tear at each other on the neck and shoulders, drawing blood and creating scars on the tough hides, Mirounga angustirostris, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon, California Male elephant seals (bulls) rear up on their foreflippers and fight for territory and harems of females.  Bull elephant seals will haul out and fight from December through March, nearly fasting the entire time as they maintain their territory and harem.  They bite and tear at each other on the neck and shoulders, drawing blood and creating scars on the tough hides, Mirounga angustirostris, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon, California Young adult male northern elephant seal, mock jousting/fighting, Mirounga angustirostris, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon, California Young adult male northern elephant seal, mock jousting/fighting, Mirounga angustirostris, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon, California Male elephant seals (bulls) rear up on their foreflippers and fight for territory and harems of females.  Bull elephant seals will haul out and fight from December through March, nearly fasting the entire time as they maintain their territory and harem.  They bite and tear at each other on the neck and shoulders, drawing blood and creating scars on the tough hides.  Sandy beach rookery, winter, Central California, Mirounga angustirostris, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon Male elephant seals (bulls) rear up on their foreflippers and fight for territory and harems of females.  Bull elephant seals will haul out and fight from December through March, nearly fasting the entire time as they maintain their territory and harem.  They bite and tear at each other on the neck and shoulders, drawing blood and creating scars on the tough hides.  Sandy beach rookery, winter, Central California, Mirounga angustirostris, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon Male elephant seals (bulls) rear up on their foreflippers and fight for territory and harems of females.  Bull elephant seals will haul out and fight from December through March, nearly fasting the entire time as they maintain their territory and harem.  They bite and tear at each other on the neck and shoulders, drawing blood and creating scars on the tough hides.  Sandy beach rookery, winter, Central California, Mirounga angustirostris, Piedras Blancas, San Simeon Great white shark, injury behind right pectoral fin likely from another white shark during courtship or territorial dispute, Carcharodon carcharias, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Adult male Guadalupe fur seal, acting territorially, patrolling his harem boundary.  An endangered species, the Guadalupe fur seal appears to be recovering in both numbers and range, Arctocephalus townsendi, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Adult male Guadalupe fur seal, acting territorially, patrolling his harem boundary.  An endangered species, the Guadalupe fur seal appears to be recovering in both numbers and range, Arctocephalus townsendi, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Adult male Guadalupe fur seals fighting over territorial boundaries during summer mating season.  During the summer mating season, a single adjult male will form a harem of females and continually patrol the boundary of his territory, keeping the females near and intimidating other males from approaching, Arctocephalus townsendi, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)

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Updated: October 22, 2021