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Bignose Unicornfish, Naso vlamingii, being cleaned by a small wrasse, Fiji, Naso vlamingii, Namena Marine Reserve, Namena Island Add To Light Table Elk, bull elk, adult male elk with large set of antlers.  By September, this bull elk's antlers have reached their full size and the velvet has fallen off. This bull elk has sparred with other bulls for access to herds of females in estrous and ready to mate, Cervus canadensis, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Add To Light Table Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers.  This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest, Cervus canadensis roosevelti, Redwood National Park, California Add To Light Table
Bignose Unicornfish, Naso vlamingii, being cleaned by a small wrasse, Fiji.
Image ID: 34735  
Species: Bignose Unicornfish, Naso vlamingii
Location: Namena Marine Reserve, Namena Island, Fiji
 
Elk, bull elk, adult male elk with large set of antlers. By September, this bull elk's antlers have reached their full size and the velvet has fallen off. This bull elk has sparred with other bulls for access to herds of females in estrous and ready to mate.
Image ID: 19721  
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers. This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest.
Image ID: 25890  
Species: Roosevelt elk, Cervus canadensis roosevelti
Location: Redwood National Park, California, USA
 
Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers.  This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest, Cervus canadensis roosevelti, Redwood National Park, California Add To Light Table California golden gorgonian, Garibaldi and Sheephead wrasse fishes on rocky reef, below kelp forest, underwater. The golden gorgonian is a filter-feeding temperate colonial species that lives on the rocky bottom at depths between 50 to 200 feet deep. Each individual polyp is a distinct animal, together they secrete calcium that forms the structure of the colony. Gorgonians are oriented at right angles to prevailing water currents to capture plankton drifting by, Semicossyphus pulcher, Hypsypops rubicundus, Muricea californica, San Clemente Island Add To Light Table Harlequin tuskfish, Choerodon fasciatus Add To Light Table
Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers. This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest.
Image ID: 25878  
Species: Roosevelt elk, Cervus canadensis roosevelti
Location: Redwood National Park, California, USA
 
California golden gorgonian, Garibaldi and Sheephead wrasse fishes on rocky reef, below kelp forest, underwater. The golden gorgonian is a filter-feeding temperate colonial species that lives on the rocky bottom at depths between 50 to 200 feet deep. Each individual polyp is a distinct animal, together they secrete calcium that forms the structure of the colony. Gorgonians are oriented at right angles to prevailing water currents to capture plankton drifting by.
Image ID: 30922  
Species: California sheephead wrasse, Garibaldi, California golden gorgonian, Semicossyphus pulcher, Hypsypops rubicundus, Muricea californica
Location: San Clemente Island, California, USA
 
Harlequin tuskfish.
Image ID: 12885  
Species: Harlequin tuskfish, Choerodon fasciatus
 
Bull elk, antlers bearing velvet, Gibbon Meadow. Elk are the most abundant large mammal found in Yellowstone National Park. More than 30,000 elk from 8 different herds summer in Yellowstone and approximately 15,000 to 22,000 winter in the park. Bulls grow antlers annually from the time they are nearly one year old. When mature, a bulls rack may have 6 to 8 points or tines on each side and weigh more than 30 pounds. The antlers are shed in March or April and begin regrowing in May, when the bony growth is nourished by blood vessels and covered by furry-looking velvet, Cervus canadensis, Gibbon Meadows Add To Light Table California golden gorgonian and small juvenile sheephead fishes on rocky reef, below kelp forest, underwater.  The golden gorgonian is a filter-feeding temperate colonial species that lives on the rocky bottom at depths between 50 to 200 feet deep.  Each individual polyp is a distinct animal, together they secrete calcium that forms the structure of the colony. Gorgonians are oriented at right angles to prevailing water currents to capture plankton drifting by, Muricea californica, Semicossyphus pulcher, San Clemente Island Add To Light Table California Golden gorgonian, red gorgonian, sheephead, Muricea californica, Lophogorgia chilensis, Semicossyphus pulcher, San Clemente Island Add To Light Table
Bull elk, antlers bearing velvet, Gibbon Meadow. Elk are the most abundant large mammal found in Yellowstone National Park. More than 30,000 elk from 8 different herds summer in Yellowstone and approximately 15,000 to 22,000 winter in the park. Bulls grow antlers annually from the time they are nearly one year old. When mature, a bulls rack may have 6 to 8 points or tines on each side and weigh more than 30 pounds. The antlers are shed in March or April and begin regrowing in May, when the bony growth is nourished by blood vessels and covered by furry-looking velvet.
Image ID: 13154  
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Gibbon Meadows, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
California golden gorgonian and small juvenile sheephead fishes on rocky reef, below kelp forest, underwater. The golden gorgonian is a filter-feeding temperate colonial species that lives on the rocky bottom at depths between 50 to 200 feet deep. Each individual polyp is a distinct animal, together they secrete calcium that forms the structure of the colony. Gorgonians are oriented at right angles to prevailing water currents to capture plankton drifting by.
Image ID: 23421  
Species: California golden gorgonian, Muricea californica, Semicossyphus pulcher
Location: San Clemente Island, California, USA
 
California Golden gorgonian, red gorgonian, sheephead.
Image ID: 02533  
Species: California golden gorgonian, Muricea californica, Lophogorgia chilensis, Semicossyphus pulcher
Location: San Clemente Island, California, USA
 
Mexican hogfish, adult male showing fleshy bump on head, Revilligigedos, Bodianus diplotaenia Add To Light Table Harlequin tuskfish, Choerodon fasciatus Add To Light Table Mexican hogfish, adult male showing fleshy bump on head, Bodianus diplotaenia, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Add To Light Table
Mexican hogfish, adult male showing fleshy bump on head, Revilligigedos.
Image ID: 05768  
Species: Mexican hogfish, Bodianus diplotaenia
 
Harlequin tuskfish.
Image ID: 08846  
Species: Harlequin tuskfish, Choerodon fasciatus
 
Mexican hogfish, adult male showing fleshy bump on head.
Image ID: 09606  
Species: Mexican hogfish, Bodianus diplotaenia
Location: Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe), Baja California, Mexico
 
Mexican hogfish, adult male showing fleshy bump on head, Bodianus diplotaenia, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Add To Light Table Mexican hogfish, adult male showing fleshy bump on head, Bodianus diplotaenia, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Add To Light Table California golden gorgonian and small juvenile sheephead fishes on rocky reef, below kelp forest, underwater. The golden gorgonian is a filter-feeding temperate colonial species that lives on the rocky bottom at depths between 50 to 200 feet deep. Each individual polyp is a distinct animal, together they secrete calcium that forms the structure of the colony. Gorgonians are oriented at right angles to prevailing water currents to capture plankton drifting by, Semicossyphus pulcher, San Clemente Island Add To Light Table
Mexican hogfish, adult male showing fleshy bump on head.
Image ID: 09609  
Species: Mexican hogfish, Bodianus diplotaenia
Location: Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe), Baja California, Mexico
 
Mexican hogfish, adult male showing fleshy bump on head.
Image ID: 09618  
Species: Mexican hogfish, Bodianus diplotaenia
Location: Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe), Baja California, Mexico
 
California golden gorgonian and small juvenile sheephead fishes on rocky reef, below kelp forest, underwater. The golden gorgonian is a filter-feeding temperate colonial species that lives on the rocky bottom at depths between 50 to 200 feet deep. Each individual polyp is a distinct animal, together they secrete calcium that forms the structure of the colony. Gorgonians are oriented at right angles to prevailing water currents to capture plankton drifting by.
Image ID: 30903  
Species: California sheephead wrasse, Semicossyphus pulcher
Location: San Clemente Island, California, USA
 
Cortez rainbow wrasse schooling over reef in mating display, Sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico, Thalassoma lucasanum Add To Light Table Bignose Unicornfish, Naso vlamingii, being cleaned by a small wrasse, Fiji, Naso vlamingii, Namena Marine Reserve, Namena Island Add To Light Table California golden gorgonian and Sheephead wrasse fish on rocky reef, below kelp forest, underwater. The golden gorgonian is a filter-feeding temperate colonial species that lives on the rocky bottom at depths between 50 to 200 feet deep. Each individual polyp is a distinct animal, together they secrete calcium that forms the structure of the colony. Gorgonians are oriented at right angles to prevailing water currents to capture plankton drifting by, Catalina Island Add To Light Table
Cortez rainbow wrasse schooling over reef in mating display, Sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico.
Image ID: 27576  
Species: Rainbow wrasse, Thalassoma lucasanum
Location: Sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico
 
Bignose Unicornfish, Naso vlamingii, being cleaned by a small wrasse, Fiji.
Image ID: 34998  
Species: Bignose Unicornfish, Naso vlamingii
Location: Namena Marine Reserve, Namena Island, Fiji
 
California golden gorgonian and Sheephead wrasse fish on rocky reef, below kelp forest, underwater. The golden gorgonian is a filter-feeding temperate colonial species that lives on the rocky bottom at depths between 50 to 200 feet deep. Each individual polyp is a distinct animal, together they secrete calcium that forms the structure of the colony. Gorgonians are oriented at right angles to prevailing water currents to capture plankton drifting by.
Image ID: 34183  
Location: Catalina Island, California, USA
 
California golden gorgonian, Garibaldi and Sheephead wrasse fishes on rocky reef, below kelp forest, underwater. The golden gorgonian is a filter-feeding temperate colonial species that lives on the rocky bottom at depths between 50 to 200 feet deep. Each individual polyp is a distinct animal, together they secrete calcium that forms the structure of the colony. Gorgonians are oriented at right angles to prevailing water currents to capture plankton drifting by, Catalina Island Add To Light Table Sheephead and invasive sargassum, Catalina, Semicossyphus pulcher, Sargassum horneri, Catalina Island Add To Light Table Large male elk (bull) in snow covered meadow near Madison River.  Only male elk have antlers, which start growing in the spring and are shed each winter. The largest antlers may be 4 feet long and weigh up to 40 pounds. Antlers are made of bone which can grow up to one inch per day. While growing, the antlers are covered with and protected by a soft layer of highly vascularised skin known as velvet. The velvet is shed in the summer when the antlers have fully developed. Bull elk may have six or more tines on each antler, however the number of tines has little to do with the age or maturity of a particular animal, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Add To Light Table
California golden gorgonian, Garibaldi and Sheephead wrasse fishes on rocky reef, below kelp forest, underwater. The golden gorgonian is a filter-feeding temperate colonial species that lives on the rocky bottom at depths between 50 to 200 feet deep. Each individual polyp is a distinct animal, together they secrete calcium that forms the structure of the colony. Gorgonians are oriented at right angles to prevailing water currents to capture plankton drifting by.
Image ID: 34186  
Location: Catalina Island, California, USA
 
Sheephead and invasive sargassum, Catalina.
Image ID: 30974  
Species: Sheephead wrasse, Sargassum, Semicossyphus pulcher, Sargassum horneri
Location: Catalina Island, California, USA
 
Large male elk (bull) in snow covered meadow near Madison River. Only male elk have antlers, which start growing in the spring and are shed each winter. The largest antlers may be 4 feet long and weigh up to 40 pounds. Antlers are made of bone which can grow up to one inch per day. While growing, the antlers are covered with and protected by a soft layer of highly vascularised skin known as velvet. The velvet is shed in the summer when the antlers have fully developed. Bull elk may have six or more tines on each antler, however the number of tines has little to do with the age or maturity of a particular animal.
Image ID: 19692  
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
 
California sheephead and golden gorgonian, giant kelp forest filters sunlight in the background, underwater, Semicossyphus pulcher, Muricea californica, Catalina Island Add To Light Table Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers.  This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest, Cervus canadensis roosevelti, Redwood National Park, California Add To Light Table Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers.  This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest, Cervus canadensis roosevelti, Redwood National Park, California Add To Light Table
California sheephead and golden gorgonian, giant kelp forest filters sunlight in the background, underwater.
Image ID: 23449  
Species: California sheephead wrasse, Semicossyphus pulcher, Muricea californica
Location: Catalina Island, California, USA
 
Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers. This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest.
Image ID: 25880  
Species: Roosevelt elk, Cervus canadensis roosevelti
Location: Redwood National Park, California, USA
 
Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers. This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest.
Image ID: 25881  
Species: Roosevelt elk, Cervus canadensis roosevelti
Location: Redwood National Park, California, USA
 
Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers.  This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest, Cervus canadensis roosevelti, Redwood National Park, California Add To Light Table California sheephead and golden gorgonian, giant kelp forest filters sunlight in the background, underwater, Semicossyphus pulcher, Muricea californica, Catalina Island Add To Light Table California golden gorgonian and Sheephead wrasse fishes on rocky reef, below kelp forest, underwater. The golden gorgonian is a filter-feeding temperate colonial species that lives on the rocky bottom at depths between 50 to 200 feet deep. Each individual polyp is a distinct animal, together they secrete calcium that forms the structure of the colony. Gorgonians are oriented at right angles to prevailing water currents to capture plankton drifting by, Semicossyphus pulcher, San Clemente Island Add To Light Table
Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers. This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest.
Image ID: 25891  
Species: Roosevelt elk, Cervus canadensis roosevelti
Location: Redwood National Park, California, USA
 
California sheephead and golden gorgonian, giant kelp forest filters sunlight in the background, underwater.
Image ID: 23472  
Species: California sheephead wrasse, Semicossyphus pulcher, Muricea californica
Location: Catalina Island, California, USA
 
California golden gorgonian and Sheephead wrasse fishes on rocky reef, below kelp forest, underwater. The golden gorgonian is a filter-feeding temperate colonial species that lives on the rocky bottom at depths between 50 to 200 feet deep. Each individual polyp is a distinct animal, together they secrete calcium that forms the structure of the colony. Gorgonians are oriented at right angles to prevailing water currents to capture plankton drifting by.
Image ID: 30888  
Species: California sheephead wrasse, Semicossyphus pulcher
Location: San Clemente Island, California, USA
 
Juvenile sheephead and gorgonian, Catalina, Semicossyphus pulcher, Catalina Island Add To Light Table Cortez rainbow wrasse schooling over reef in mating display, Los Islotes, Baja California, Mexico Add To Light Table Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers.  This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest, Cervus canadensis roosevelti, Redwood National Park, California Add To Light Table
Juvenile sheephead and gorgonian, Catalina.
Image ID: 30975  
Species: Sheephead wrasse, Semicossyphus pulcher
Location: Catalina Island, California, USA
 
Cortez rainbow wrasse schooling over reef in mating display.
Image ID: 32576  
Location: Los Islotes, Baja California, Mexico
 
Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers. This bull elk has recently shed the velvet that covers its antlers. While an antler is growing, it is covered with highly vascular skin called velvet, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to the growing bone; once the antler has achieved its full size, the velvet is lost and the antler's bone dies. This dead bone structure is the mature antler, which is itself shed after each mating season. Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest.
Image ID: 25892  
Species: Roosevelt elk, Cervus canadensis roosevelti
Location: Redwood National Park, California, USA
 


Natural History Photography Blog posts (6) related to Velvet Multicolor Wrasse



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Categories Appearing Among These Images:
Animal  >  Bird  >  Goose (Anatidae)  >  Kelp goose
Animal  >  Fish  >  Fish Anatomy  >  Adult / Juvenile Difference
Animal  >  Fish  >  Fish Anatomy  >  Color and Pattern  >  Stripe
Animal  >  Fish  >  Fish Anatomy  >  Juvenile
Animal  >  Fish  >  Fish Anatomy  >  Male - Female Difference
Animal  >  Fish  >  Fish Behavior  >  Cleaning (Symbiosis)
Animal  >  Fish  >  Fish Behavior  >  Feeding
Animal  >  Fish  >  Marine Fish  >  Butterflyfish (Chaetodontidae)
Animal  >  Fish  >  Marine Fish  >  Damselfish (Pomacentridae)  >  Garibaldi
Animal  >  Fish  >  Marine Fish  >  Indo-Pacific
Animal  >  Fish  >  Marine Fish  >  Tang (Acanthuridae)
Animal  >  Fish  >  Marine Fish  >  Wrasse (Labridae)
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Elk
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Elk  >  Antler Velvet
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Elk  >  Elk Rut
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Elk  >  Roosevelt Elk
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Coral  >  Soft Coral  >  Gorgonian
Gallery  >  California
Gallery  >  Canon 7D Samples
Gallery  >  Falkland Islands
Gallery  >  Fiji Coral Reef
Gallery  >  Gorgonian
Gallery  >  Guadalupe Island
Gallery  >  Kelp Forest
Gallery  >  New Work November 2011
Gallery  >  Ocean And Motion
Gallery  >  Redwood National Park
Gallery  >  San Clemente Island
Gallery  >  Sea of Cortez
Gallery  >  Wildlife Portraits
Location  >  Oceans  >  Atlantic  >  Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)  >  Channel Islands  >  Catalina Island
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)  >  Channel Islands  >  San Clemente Island
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)  >  Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)  >  Revilligigedos Islands (Socorro)
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  Fiji Islands
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  Galapagos Islands (Ecuador)  >  Underwater
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  International  >  Isla Guadalupe Special Biosphere Reserve (Mexico)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Redwood National Park (California)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  World Heritage Sites  >  Galapagos Islands (Ecuador)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  World Heritage Sites  >  Redwood National Park (USA)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  World Heritage Sites  >  Yellowstone National Park (USA)
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  Catalina Island
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  Redwood National Park
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  San Clemente Island
Location  >  USA  >  Wyoming  >  Yellowstone National Park
Location  >  World  >  Ecuador  >  Galapagos Islands  >  Cousins Rock
Location  >  World  >  Mexico  >  Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)
Location  >  World  >  Mexico  >  Revilligigedos Islands (Socorro)
Location  >  World  >  Mexico  >  Sea of Cortez
Location  >  World  >  United Kingdom  >  Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)  >  New Island
Natural World  >  Habitat  >  Kelp Forest
Subject  >  Effect  >  Motion / Blur
Subject  >  Technique  >  Captivity  >  Aquarium
Subject  >  Technique  >  Underwater

Species Appearing Among These Images:
Acanthurus nigricaudas
Bodianus diplotaenia
Bodianus eclancheri
Cervus canadensis
Cervus canadensis roosevelti
Chaetodon semilarvatus
Cheilinus fasciatus
Chloephaga hybrida
Chloephaga hybrida malvinarum
Choerodon fasciatus
Coris formosa
Hypsypops rubicundus
Lophogorgia chilensis
Muricea californica
Naso vlamingii
Oxyjulis californica
Sargassum horneri
Semicossyphus pulcher
Thalassoma grammaticum
Thalassoma hardwicke
Thalassoma lucasanum
Thalassoma rueppellii

Natural History Photography Blog posts (6) related to Velvet Multicolor Wrasse
A Sampling of Fiji Marine Creatures
Roosevelt Elk, Cervus canadensis roosevelti
Kelp Forest Reminiscing
Elk Photos
The Kelp Forest :: Part V
Photo of California Sheephead Wrasse

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Updated: June 17, 2021