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Orange Spring Mound.  Many years of mineral deposition has built up Orange Spring Mound, part of the Mammoth Hot Springs complex, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming New Blue Spring and its travertine terraces, part of the Mammoth Hot Springs complex, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Lamar Valley, summer. The Lamar Valleys rolling hills are home to many large mammals and are often called Americas Serengeti, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Canada geese on the Yellowstone River, Branta canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring steams in cold winter air, Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Bison, Bison bison, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Bison, Bison bison, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Bison, Bison bison, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Bison wades across the Madison River, autumn, Bison bison, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Coyote, Canis latrans, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming A coyote hunts for voles in tall grass, autumn, Canis latrans, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Coyote, Canis latrans, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Bull elk in sage brush with large rack of antlers during the fall rut (mating season).  This bull elk has sparred with other bulls to establish his harem of females with which he hopes to mate, Cervus canadensis, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Mule deer in tall grass, fall, autumn, Odocoileus hemionus, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Bison grazes amid grass fields along the Madison River, Bison bison, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grizzly bear, autumn, fall, brown grasses, Ursus arctos horribilis, Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grizzly bear in snow, Ursus arctos horribilis, Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming The Pronghorn antelope is the fastest North American land animal, capable of reaching speeds of up to 60 miles per hour. The pronghorns speed is its main defense against predators, Antilocapra americana, Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming The Pronghorn antelope is the fastest North American land animal, capable of reaching speeds of up to 60 miles per hour. The pronghorns speed is its main defense against predators, Antilocapra americana, Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming A male moose, bull moose, on snow covered field, near Cooke City, Alces alces, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming A male moose, bull moose, on snow covered field, near Cooke City, Alces alces, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming White Dome Geyser, rises to a height of 30 feet or more, and typically erupts with an interval of 15 to 30 minutes. It is located along Firehole Lake Drive, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grand Prismatic Spring displays brilliant colors along its edges, created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges. The outer orange and red regions are the coolest water in the spring, where the overflow runs off, Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Morning Glory Pool has long been considered a must-see site in Yellowstone. At one time a road brought visitors to its brink. Over the years they threw coins, bottles and trash in the pool, reducing its flow and causing the red and orange bacteria to creep in from its edge, replacing the blue bacteria that thrive in the hotter water at the center of the pool. The pool is now accessed only by a foot path. Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Elk graze and rest among wildflowers blooming in the Gibbon Meadow, summer, Cervus canadensis, Gibbon Meadows, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Elk in the Gibbon River, Cervus canadensis, Gibbon Meadows, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Anemone Geyser erupts, Old Faithful Inn visible in the distance.  Anemone Geyser cycles about every 7 minutes.  First the pools fills, then overflows, then bubbles and splashes before erupting.  The eruption empties the pools and the cycle begins anew.  Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Large male elk (bull) in snow covered meadow near Madison River.  Only male elk have antlers, which start growing in the spring and are shed each winter. The largest antlers may be 4 feet long and weigh up to 40 pounds. Antlers are made of bone which can grow up to one inch per day. While growing, the antlers are covered with and protected by a soft layer of highly vascularised skin known as velvet. The velvet is shed in the summer when the antlers have fully developed. Bull elk may have six or more tines on each antler, however the number of tines has little to do with the age or maturity of a particular animal, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Female elk along the Madison River during an early fall snow, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Juvenile elk in golden, late afternoon light, in meadow along Madison River, autumn, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Madison River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Old Faithful geyser, peak eruption, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Snow covers the rocks and cliffs around Lower Yellowstone Falls in winter. At 308 feet, the Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River is the tallest fall in the park. This view is from Lookout Point on the North side of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming A rainbow appears in the mist of the Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River.  At 308 feet, the Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River is the tallest fall in the park.  This view is from the famous and popular Artist Point on the south side of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.  When conditions are perfect in midsummer, a morning rainbow briefly appears in the falls, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming The Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River drops 308 feet at the head of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. A long exposure blurs the fast-flowing water.  The canyon is approximately 10,000 years old, 20 miles long, 1000 ft deep, and 2500 ft wide. Its yellow, orange and red-colored walls are due to oxidation of the various iron compounds in the soil, and to a lesser degree, sulfur content, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Yellowstone Falls from Uncle Tom's Trail.  Lower Yellowstone Falls shows a beautiful rainbow as it cascades 308' in a thundering plunge into the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Grotto Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Upper Geyser Basin Grotto Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Upper Geyser Basin Grand Prismatic Spring displays brilliant colors along its edges, created by species of thermophilac (heat-loving) bacteria that thrive in narrow temperature ranges. The outer orange and red regions are the coolest water in the spring, where the overflow runs off, Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming A coyote hunts for voles in tall grass, autumn, Canis latrans, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Juvenile elk in golden, late afternoon light, in meadow along Madison River, autumn, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Female and young elk in early autumn snowfall, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Juvenile elk in golden, late afternoon light, in meadow along Madison River, autumn, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming   more ...

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Updated: October 16, 2021