Freshwater Fish photos

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Unidentified cichlid fish
Unidentified cichlid fish.
Image ID: 11023  
Red zebra mbuna, Pseudotropheus estherae
Red zebra mbuna.
Species: Red zebra mbuna, Pseudotropheus estherae
Image ID: 11037  
Unidentified cichlid fish
Unidentified cichlid fish.
Image ID: 11044  
Unidentified cichlid fish
Unidentified cichlid fish.
Image ID: 11045  
Sheepshead, Archosargus probatocephalus
Sheepshead.
Species: Sheepshead, Archosargus probatocephalus
Image ID: 11046  
Unidentified cichlid fish
Unidentified cichlid fish.
Image ID: 11047  
Unidentified cichlid fish
Unidentified cichlid fish.
Image ID: 11048  
Unidentified cichlid fish
Unidentified cichlid fish.
Image ID: 11049  
Unidentified cichlid fish
Unidentified cichlid fish.
Image ID: 11050  
Unidentified cichlid fish
Unidentified cichlid fish.
Image ID: 11051  
Wild discus.  The female wild discuss will lay several hundred eggs and guard them until they hatch.  Once they emerge, the young fish attach themselves to the sides of their parents for the first few weeks of their lives, feeding on a milky secretion produced by glands in the parents flanks, Symphysodon discus
Wild discus. The female wild discuss will lay several hundred eggs and guard them until they hatch. Once they emerge, the young fish attach themselves to the sides of their parents for the first few weeks of their lives, feeding on a milky secretion produced by glands in the parents flanks.
Species: Wild discus, Symphysodon discus
Image ID: 13953  
Wild discus.  The female wild discuss will lay several hundred eggs and guard them until they hatch.  Once they emerge, the young fish attach themselves to the sides of their parents for the first few weeks of their lives, feeding on a milky secretion produced by glands in the parents flanks, Symphysodon discus
Wild discus. The female wild discuss will lay several hundred eggs and guard them until they hatch. Once they emerge, the young fish attach themselves to the sides of their parents for the first few weeks of their lives, feeding on a milky secretion produced by glands in the parents flanks.
Species: Wild discus, Symphysodon discus
Image ID: 13954  
Wild discus.  The female wild discuss will lay several hundred eggs and guard them until they hatch.  Once they emerge, the young fish attach themselves to the sides of their parents for the first few weeks of their lives, feeding on a milky secretion produced by glands in the parents flanks, Symphysodon discus
Wild discus. The female wild discuss will lay several hundred eggs and guard them until they hatch. Once they emerge, the young fish attach themselves to the sides of their parents for the first few weeks of their lives, feeding on a milky secretion produced by glands in the parents flanks.
Species: Wild discus, Symphysodon discus
Image ID: 13955  
Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
Image ID: 13956  
Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
Image ID: 13957  
Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
Image ID: 13958  
Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
Image ID: 13959  
Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
Image ID: 13960  
Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
Image ID: 13961  
Red-bellied piranha.  The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives.  Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey.  The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life.  Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California, Pygocentrus nattereri
Red-bellied piranha. The piranhas teeth are so sharp that Amazonian Indians use them as knives. Each tooth has sawlike edges that allow the fish to slice through prey. The teeth are continually replaced throughout the piranhas life. Piranhas are illegal to import, sell or own in California.
Species: Red piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri
Image ID: 13962  
Longear sunfish.  Male longear sunfishes, which are larger and more colorful than the females, build nests, using their tails to carve pits out of gravel where the females can lay their eggs.  The males then guard the nest until the eggs have hatched and the young fish are large enough to leave, Lepomis megalotis
Longear sunfish. Male longear sunfishes, which are larger and more colorful than the females, build nests, using their tails to carve pits out of gravel where the females can lay their eggs. The males then guard the nest until the eggs have hatched and the young fish are large enough to leave.
Species: Longear sunfish, Lepomis megalotis
Image ID: 13963  
Banded rainbowfish.  The banded rainbowfish, from the Goyder River in Australias Northwest Territory, is evolving into a separate species (from other rainbowfishes), has assumed a narrow range and has developed a unique coloration, Melanotaenia trifasciata
Banded rainbowfish. The banded rainbowfish, from the Goyder River in Australias Northwest Territory, is evolving into a separate species (from other rainbowfishes), has assumed a narrow range and has developed a unique coloration.
Species: Banded rainbowfish, Melanotaenia trifasciata
Image ID: 13964  
Altum angelfish, Pterophyllum altum
Altum angelfish.
Species: Altum angelfish, Pterophyllum altum
Image ID: 13975  
Butterfly goodeid, Ameca splendens
Butterfly goodeid.
Species: Butterfly goodeid, Ameca splendens
Image ID: 13986  
Electric eel.  Like other members of the South American knifefish family, the electric eel relies on electrolocation to navigate in find food in murky water.  However, its electric organs are more powerful than its relatives, allowing it to produce sufficiently high voltage pulses to stun predators and prey, Electrophorus electricus
Electric eel. Like other members of the South American knifefish family, the electric eel relies on electrolocation to navigate in find food in murky water. However, its electric organs are more powerful than its relatives, allowing it to produce sufficiently high voltage pulses to stun predators and prey.
Species: Electric eel, Electrophorus electricus
Image ID: 13989  
African lungfish, Protopterus annectens
African lungfish.
Species: African lungfish, Protopterus annectens
Image ID: 14678  
African lungfish, Protopterus annectens
African lungfish.
Species: African lungfish, Protopterus annectens
Image ID: 14679  
African lungfish, Protopterus annectens
African lungfish.
Species: African lungfish, Protopterus annectens
Image ID: 14680  
African lungfish, Protopterus annectens
African lungfish.
Species: African lungfish, Protopterus annectens
Image ID: 14681  
African lungfish, Protopterus annectens
African lungfish.
Species: African lungfish, Protopterus annectens
Image ID: 14682