National Parks photos

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Coastal brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Coastal brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide. Grizzly bear.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19140  
Juvenile female brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Juvenile female brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide. Grizzly bear.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19141  
Coastal brown bear on sand flats at low tide, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Coastal brown bear on sand flats at low tide.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19142  
Young brown bear stands in tall sedge grass to get a better view of other approaching bears, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Young brown bear stands in tall sedge grass to get a better view of other approaching bears.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19143  
Coastal brown bear walking on sand beach, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Coastal brown bear walking on sand beach.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19144  
Coastal brown bear walks in Silver Salmon Creek, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Coastal brown bear walks in Silver Salmon Creek.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Silver Salmon Creek, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19146  
Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass. Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19147  
Brown bears fighting or sparring.  These are likely young but sexually mature males that are simply mock fighting for practice, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Brown bears fighting or sparring. These are likely young but sexually mature males that are simply mock fighting for practice.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19148  
Mature male coastal brown bear boar waits on the tide flats at the mouth of Silver Salmon Creek for salmon to arrive.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Mature male coastal brown bear boar waits on the tide flats at the mouth of Silver Salmon Creek for salmon to arrive. Grizzly bear.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19149  
Brown bear cubs.  These cubs are one and a half years old and have yet to leave their mother.  They will be on their own and have to fend for themselves next summer, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Brown bear cubs. These cubs are one and a half years old and have yet to leave their mother. They will be on their own and have to fend for themselves next summer.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19150  
Full grown, mature male coastal brown bear boar (grizzly bear) in sedge grass meadows, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Full grown, mature male coastal brown bear boar (grizzly bear) in sedge grass meadows.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19151  
Coastal brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide.  Grizzly bear, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Coastal brown bear forages for razor clams in sand flats at extreme low tide. Grizzly bear.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19152  
A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19153  
Brown bear female sow in sedge meadow, with her three spring cubs hidden by the deep grass next to her.  These cubs were born earlier in the spring and will remain with their mother for almost two years, relying on her completely for their survival, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Brown bear female sow in sedge meadow, with her three spring cubs hidden by the deep grass next to her. These cubs were born earlier in the spring and will remain with their mother for almost two years, relying on her completely for their survival.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19154  
Coastal brown bear in meadow.  The tall sedge grasses in this coastal meadow are a food source for brown bears, who may eat 30 lbs of it each day during summer while waiting for their preferred food, salmon, to arrive in the nearby rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Coastal brown bear in meadow. The tall sedge grasses in this coastal meadow are a food source for brown bears, who may eat 30 lbs of it each day during summer while waiting for their preferred food, salmon, to arrive in the nearby rivers.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19155  
Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass. Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19156  
Portrait of a young brown bear, pausing while grazing in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Portrait of a young brown bear, pausing while grazing in tall sedge grass. Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19157  
A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19158  
Coastal brown bear cub, one and a half years old, near Johnson River.  This cub will remain with its mother for about another six months, and will be on its own next year, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Coastal brown bear cub, one and a half years old, near Johnson River. This cub will remain with its mother for about another six months, and will be on its own next year.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Johnson River, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19159  
Lazy grizzly bear naps on a log, surrounding by the grass sedge grass that is typical of the coastal region of Lake Clark National Park, Ursus arctos
Lazy grizzly bear naps on a log, surrounding by the grass sedge grass that is typical of the coastal region of Lake Clark National Park.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19160  
Full grown, mature male coastal brown bear boar (grizzly bear) in sedge grass meadows, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Full grown, mature male coastal brown bear boar (grizzly bear) in sedge grass meadows.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19161  
A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
A brown bear mother (sow) stands in tall sedge grass to look for other approaching bears that may be a threat to her cubs.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19162  
Coastal brown bear on sand flats at low tide, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Coastal brown bear on sand flats at low tide.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19163  
Juvenile female coastal brown bear walks on beach, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Juvenile female coastal brown bear walks on beach.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19164  
Coastal brown bear cub, one and a half years old, near Johnson River.  This cub will remain with its mother for about another six months, and will be on its own next year, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Coastal brown bear cub, one and a half years old, near Johnson River. This cub will remain with its mother for about another six months, and will be on its own next year.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Johnson River, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19199  
Coastal brown bear in sedge grass meadow, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Coastal brown bear in sedge grass meadow.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19223  
Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass.  Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers, Ursus arctos, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Young brown bear grazes in tall sedge grass. Brown bears can consume 30 lbs of sedge grass daily, waiting weeks until spawning salmon fill the rivers.
Species: Brown bear, Ursus arctos
Location: Lake Clark National Park, Alaska
Image ID: 19244  
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Madison River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Madison River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19697  
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females, Cervus canadensis, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Male elk bugling during the fall rut. Large male elk are known as bulls. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Male elk engage in competitive mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling and bugling, a loud series of screams which is intended to establish dominance over other males and attract females.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19698  
Elk, bull elk, adult male elk with large set of antlers.  By September, this bull elk's antlers have reached their full size and the velvet has fallen off. This bull elk has sparred with other bulls for access to herds of females in estrous and ready to mate, Cervus canadensis, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Elk, bull elk, adult male elk with large set of antlers. By September, this bull elk's antlers have reached their full size and the velvet has fallen off. This bull elk has sparred with other bulls for access to herds of females in estrous and ready to mate.
Species: Elk, Cervus canadensis
Location: Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
Image ID: 19721