Roots Photo


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Ancient bristlecone pine tree, roots spread wide and exposed over dolomite-rich soil, rising above the arid slopes of the Schulman Grove in the White Mountains at an elevation of 9500 above sea level, along the Methuselah Walk.  The oldest bristlecone pines in the world are found in the Schulman Grove, some of them over 4700 years old. Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest, Pinus longaeva, White Mountains, Inyo National Forest Giant sequoia trees, roots spreading outward at the base of each massive tree, rise from the shaded forest floor, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California Giant sequoia trees, roots spreading outward at the base of each massive tree, rise from the shaded forest floor, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California
Ancient bristlecone pine tree, roots spread wide and exposed over dolomite-rich soil, rising above the arid slopes of the Schulman Grove in the White Mountains at an elevation of 9500 above sea level, along the Methuselah Walk. The oldest bristlecone pines in the world are found in the Schulman Grove, some of them over 4700 years old. Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest. Roots Photo.
Image ID: 23234  
Species: Bristlecone Pine, Pinus longaeva
Location: White Mountains, Inyo National Forest, California, USA
 
Giant sequoia trees, roots spreading outward at the base of each massive tree, rise from the shaded forest floor. Roots Picture.
Image ID: 23258  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California, USA
 
Giant sequoia trees, roots spreading outward at the base of each massive tree, rise from the shaded forest floor. Stock Photography of Roots.
Image ID: 23257  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California, USA
 
Giant sequoia trees, roots spreading outward at the base of each massive tree, rise from the shaded forest floor, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California California fuschia, Batiquitos Lagoon, Carlsbad, California.  A member of the primrose family.  Local tribes occasionally ate seeds of this species, while leaves and roots were sometimes boiled and eaten.  Settlers gathered seeds and used them as a natural remedy for a variety of illnesses, effectively, since this species contains gamma-linoleic acid, Epilobium cana Three Sisters Springs, fish and tree roots, Crystal River, Florida
Giant sequoia trees, roots spreading outward at the base of each massive tree, rise from the shaded forest floor. Photograph of Roots.
Image ID: 23288  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California, USA
 
California fuschia, Batiquitos Lagoon, Carlsbad, California. A member of the primrose family. Local tribes occasionally ate seeds of this species, while leaves and roots were sometimes boiled and eaten. Settlers gathered seeds and used them as a natural remedy for a variety of illnesses, effectively, since this species contains gamma-linoleic acid. Roots Photos.
Image ID: 11334  
Species: California fuschia, Epilobium cana
Location: Batiquitos Lagoon, Carlsbad, California, USA
 
Three Sisters Springs, fish and tree roots. Roots Image.
Image ID: 02677  
Location: Three Sisters Springs, Crystal River, Florida, USA
 
Three Sisters Springs, fish and tree roots, Crystal River, Florida The Tennessee Tree shows resilience to fire damage, continuing to thrive in spite of deep fire scars. The living tissue or cambium layer of a sequoia lies just under its bark. As long as some of this thin, living tissue connects the leaves above with the roots below, the tree will continue to live. If undisturbed by people, or more fire, this living layer will eventually heal the fire scars seen on this tree. Grant Grove, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California
Three Sisters Springs, fish and tree roots. Professional stock photos of Roots.
Image ID: 02678  
Location: Three Sisters Springs, Crystal River, Florida, USA
 
The Tennessee Tree shows resilience to fire damage, continuing to thrive in spite of deep fire scars. The living tissue or cambium layer of a sequoia lies just under its bark. As long as some of this thin, living tissue connects the leaves above with the roots below, the tree will continue to live. If undisturbed by people, or more fire, this living layer will eventually heal the fire scars seen on this tree. Grant Grove. Pictures of Roots.
Image ID: 09873  
Species: Giant sequoia tree, Sequoiadendron giganteum
Location: Grant Grove, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA
 


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Categories Appearing Among These Images:
Gallery  >  Ancient Bristlecone Pine Tree
Gallery  >  California
Gallery  >  Yosemite National Park
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  Ecological Reserves  >  Batiquitos Lagoon Ecological Reserve
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Forests  >  Inyo National Forest  >  Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Sequoia / Kings Canyon National Park (California)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Parks  >  Yosemite National Park (California)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  World Heritage Sites  >  Yosemite National Park (USA)
Location  >  USA  >  California
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  Carlsbad
Location  >  USA  >  Florida  >  Crystal River  >  Three Sisters Springs
Location  >  USA  >  Florida  >  Spring / River
Plant  >  Terrestrial Plant  >  Tree  >  Pine Tree  >  Bristlecone Pine Tree
Plant  >  Terrestrial Plant  >  Tree  >  Redwood Tree  >  Sequoia Tree
Plant  >  Wildflower  >  Coastal Wildflower
Portfolio
Subject  >  Technique  >  Underwater

Species Appearing Among These Images:
Epilobium cana
Pinus longaeva
Sequoiadendron giganteum

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Updated: October 18, 2019