Sea Urchin Photos

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Sea urchins cling to a shallow reef in Browning Pass, Vancouver Island
Sea urchins cling to a shallow reef in Browning Pass, Vancouver Island.
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 35323  
Sea Urchin Detail, Sea of Cortez, Mexico, Isla San Francisquito, Baja California
Sea Urchin Detail, Sea of Cortez, Mexico.
Location: Isla San Francisquito, Baja California, Mexico
Image ID: 33648  
Wolf eel, although similar in shape to eels, is cartilaginous and not a true fish.  Its powerful jaws can crush invertibrates, such as spiny sea urchins.  It can grow to 6 feet (2m) in length, Anarrhichthys ocellatus
Wolf eel, although similar in shape to eels, is cartilaginous and not a true fish. Its powerful jaws can crush invertibrates, such as spiny sea urchins. It can grow to 6 feet (2m) in length.
Species: Wolf eel, Anarrhichthys ocellatus
Image ID: 13702  
Juvenile garibaldi and purple urchins, Coronado Islands, Hypsypops rubicundus, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado)
Juvenile garibaldi and purple urchins, Coronado Islands.
Species: Garibaldi, Hypsypops rubicundus, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
Location: Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado), Baja California, Mexico
Image ID: 02513  
Flower sea urchin with pedicellariae visible, Toxopneustes roseus, Sea of Cortez
Flower sea urchin with pedicellariae visible.
Species: Flower sea urchin, Toxopneustes roseus
Location: Sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico
Image ID: 27528  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21612  
Sea urchins cling to a shallow reef in Browning Pass, Vancouver Island
Sea urchins cling to a shallow reef in Browning Pass, Vancouver Island.
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Image ID: 35457  
Sea Urchin Detail, Sea of Cortez, Mexico, Isla San Francisquito, Baja California
Sea Urchin Detail, Sea of Cortez, Mexico.
Location: Isla San Francisquito, Baja California, Mexico
Image ID: 33647  
Sea Urchin Detail, Sea of Cortez, Mexico, Isla San Francisquito, Baja California
Sea Urchin Detail, Sea of Cortez, Mexico.
Location: Isla San Francisquito, Baja California, Mexico
Image ID: 33649  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21609  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21622  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21640  
Flower sea urchin with pedicellariae visible, Toxopneustes roseus, Sea of Cortez
Flower sea urchin with pedicellariae visible.
Species: Flower sea urchin, Toxopneustes roseus
Location: Sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico
Image ID: 27533  
Diver and Sea Urchins, Laguna Beach
Diver and Sea Urchins, Laguna Beach.
Location: Laguna Beach, California
Image ID: 36268  
Unidentified sea urchin, North Seymour Island
Unidentified sea urchin.
Location: North Seymour Island, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador
Image ID: 16421  
Purple urchins destroying/eating giant kelp holdfast, Macrocystis pyrifera, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Santa Barbara Island
Purple urchins destroying/eating giant kelp holdfast.
Species: Purple urchin, Macrocystis pyrifera, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
Location: Santa Barbara Island, California
Image ID: 03404  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21652  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21660  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21661  
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs.
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Image ID: 21662  
Wolf eel, although similar in shape to eels, is cartilaginous and not a true fish.  Its powerful jaws can crush invertibrates, such as spiny sea urchins.  It can grow to 6 feet (2m) in length, Anarrhichthys ocellatus
Wolf eel, although similar in shape to eels, is cartilaginous and not a true fish. Its powerful jaws can crush invertibrates, such as spiny sea urchins. It can grow to 6 feet (2m) in length.
Species: Wolf eel, Anarrhichthys ocellatus
Image ID: 11847  
Wolf eel, although similar in shape to eels, is cartilaginous and not a true fish.  Its powerful jaws can crush invertibrates, such as spiny sea urchins.  It can grow to 6 feet (2m) in length, Anarrhichthys ocellatus
Wolf eel, although similar in shape to eels, is cartilaginous and not a true fish. Its powerful jaws can crush invertibrates, such as spiny sea urchins. It can grow to 6 feet (2m) in length.
Species: Wolf eel, Anarrhichthys ocellatus
Image ID: 11848  
California sea cucumber.  Sea cucumbers are related to sea stars and sea urchins. The sharp looking spines are soft to the touch and disappear into the skin when disturbed. If this visual defense doesnt work, the sea cucumber will expel its respiratory system. When this occurs in the wild it can regrow the lost organs, Parastichopus californicus
California sea cucumber. Sea cucumbers are related to sea stars and sea urchins. The sharp looking spines are soft to the touch and disappear into the skin when disturbed. If this visual defense doesnt work, the sea cucumber will expel its respiratory system. When this occurs in the wild it can regrow the lost organs.
Species: California sea cucumber, Parastichopus californicus
Image ID: 13732  
California sea cucumber.  Sea cucumbers are related to sea stars and sea urchins. The sharp looking spines are soft to the touch and disappear into the skin when disturbed. If this visual defense doesnt work, the sea cucumber will expel its respiratory system. When this occurs in the wild it can regrow the lost organs, Parastichopus californicus
California sea cucumber. Sea cucumbers are related to sea stars and sea urchins. The sharp looking spines are soft to the touch and disappear into the skin when disturbed. If this visual defense doesnt work, the sea cucumber will expel its respiratory system. When this occurs in the wild it can regrow the lost organs.
Species: California sea cucumber, Parastichopus californicus
Image ID: 13733  
Unidentified sea urchin, Cousins
Unidentified sea urchin.
Location: Cousins, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador
Image ID: 16423  
Purple sea urchins on rocky reef amid kelp forest, Macrocystis pyrifera, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Santa Barbara Island
Purple sea urchins on rocky reef amid kelp forest.
Species: Purple urchin, Macrocystis pyrifera, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
Location: Santa Barbara Island, California
Image ID: 03111  
Purple urchins destroying/eating giant kelp holdfast, Macrocystis pyrifera, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Santa Barbara Island
Purple urchins destroying/eating giant kelp holdfast.
Species: Purple urchin, Macrocystis pyrifera, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
Location: Santa Barbara Island, California
Image ID: 03403  
Purple sea urchin, spawning, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
Purple sea urchin, spawning.
Species: Purple urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
Image ID: 05346  
Purple urchin attacked by starfish, Coronados, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado)
Purple urchin attacked by starfish, Coronados.
Species: Purple urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
Location: Coronado Islands (Islas Coronado), Baja California, Mexico
Image ID: 01984  
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All photographs copyright © Phillip Colla / Oceanlight.com, all rights reserved worldwide.