Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove, Pseudotsuga menziesii



Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove.  Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees.  About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove.  Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees. MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, Pseudotsuga menziesii, natural history stock photograph, photo id 21029Add To Light Table
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Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove.  Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees.  About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove.  Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees. MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Image #22456
Cathedral Grove panorama, showing tall old-growth Douglas Fir trees. Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees.  About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove.  Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees. MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Image #21023
Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove.  Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees.  About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove.  Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees. MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Image #21025
Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove.  Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees.  About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove.  Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees. MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Image #21027
Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove.  Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees.  About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove.  Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees. MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Image #21037
Coastal redwoods and Douglas firs dominate the Muir Woods National Monument north of San Francisco.  Coast redwoods are the worlds tallest living species and second-most massive tree (after the giant Sequoia), reaching 370 ft in height and 22 ft in diameter.  Muir Woods National Monument, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, north of San Francisco. California, USA. Image #09074
Coastal redwoods and Douglas firs dominate the Muir Woods National Monument north of San Francisco.  Coast redwoods are the worlds tallest living species and second-most massive tree (after the giant Sequoia), reaching 370 ft in height and 22 ft in diameter.  Muir Woods National Monument, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, north of San Francisco. California, USA. Image #09075
Coastal redwoods and Douglas firs dominate the Muir Woods National Monument north of San Francisco.  Coast redwoods are the worlds tallest living species and second-most massive tree (after the giant Sequoia), reaching 370 ft in height and 22 ft in diameter.  Muir Woods National Monument, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, north of San Francisco. California, USA. Image #09076
Coastal redwoods and Douglas firs dominate the Muir Woods National Monument north of San Francisco.  Coast redwoods are the worlds tallest living species and second-most massive tree (after the giant Sequoia), reaching 370 ft in height and 22 ft in diameter.  Muir Woods National Monument, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, north of San Francisco. California, USA. Image #09077
Coastal redwoods and Douglas firs dominate the Muir Woods National Monument north of San Francisco.  Coast redwoods are the worlds tallest living species and second-most massive tree (after the giant Sequoia), reaching 370 ft in height and 22 ft in diameter.  Muir Woods National Monument, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, north of San Francisco. California, USA. Image #09078

Ancient Douglas fir trees in Cathedral Grove. Cathedral Grove is home to huge, ancient, old-growth Douglas fir trees. About 300 years ago a fire killed most of the trees in this grove, but a small number of trees survived and were the originators of what is now Cathedral Grove. Western redcedar trees grow in adundance in the understory below the taller Douglas fir trees. MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

Stock Photo: 21029
Species: Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii
Location: Cathedral Grove, MacMillan Provincial Park, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Format: Digital 2:3
Other Names: Coastal Douglas fir
Copyright © Phillip Colla, all rights reserved worldwide.
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Keywords: british columbia, canada, cathedral grove, douglas fir, hdr, landscape, macmillan provincial park, macmillan provincial park vancouver island, nature, ocean, old growth forest, outdoors, outside, provincial parks, pseudotsuga menziesii, scene, scenic, temperate rainforest, threatened, vancouver island, western hemlock

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