Sandy Bottom Photo


-1- 2    Next ›››

Home   >   Natural History Photography Blog   >   Search   >   Sandy Bottom
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California California bat ray, laying on sandy ocean bottom amid kelp and rocky reef, Myliobatis californica, San Clemente Island California bat ray, laying on sandy ocean bottom amid kelp and rocky reef, Myliobatis californica, San Clemente Island
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Sandy Bottom Photo.
Image ID: 21612  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
California bat ray, laying on sandy ocean bottom amid kelp and rocky reef. Sandy Bottom Picture.
Image ID: 25437  
Species: California bat ray, Myliobatis californica
Location: San Clemente Island, California, USA
 
California bat ray, laying on sandy ocean bottom amid kelp and rocky reef. Stock Photography of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 25438  
Species: California bat ray, Myliobatis californica
Location: San Clemente Island, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Photograph of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 21609  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Sandy Bottom Photos.
Image ID: 21622  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Sandy Bottom Image.
Image ID: 21640  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Professional stock photos of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 21652  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Pictures of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 21660  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Sandy Bottom Photo.
Image ID: 21661  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California Speckled sanddab, which can alter its color and pattern to better camoflage itself against the sandy bottom on which it lies, Citharichthys stigmaeus Speckled sanddab, which can alter its color and pattern to better camoflage itself against the sandy bottom on which it lies, Citharichthys stigmaeus
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Sandy Bottom Picture.
Image ID: 21662  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
Speckled sanddab, which can alter its color and pattern to better camoflage itself against the sandy bottom on which it lies. Stock Photography of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 14498  
Species: Speckled sanddab, Citharichthys stigmaeus
 
Speckled sanddab, which can alter its color and pattern to better camoflage itself against the sandy bottom on which it lies. Photograph of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 14499  
Species: Speckled sanddab, Citharichthys stigmaeus
 
Speckled sanddab, which can alter its color and pattern to better camoflage itself against the sandy bottom on which it lies, Citharichthys stigmaeus Drift kelp has washed ashore on a sandy California beach.  Winter brings large surf and increased wave energy which often rips giant kelp from the ocean bottom, so that it floats down current, often washing ashore, Macrocystis pyrifera, Santa Barbara Squid egg casings.  Each casing housings hundreds of tiny squid eggs.  After the female squid has planted her egg casings to the sandy bottom, she will die, Loligo opalescens
Speckled sanddab, which can alter its color and pattern to better camoflage itself against the sandy bottom on which it lies. Sandy Bottom Photos.
Image ID: 14554  
Species: Speckled sanddab, Citharichthys stigmaeus
 
Drift kelp has washed ashore on a sandy California beach. Winter brings large surf and increased wave energy which often rips giant kelp from the ocean bottom, so that it floats down current, often washing ashore. Sandy Bottom Image.
Image ID: 14884  
Species: Giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera
Location: Santa Barbara, California, USA
 
Squid egg casings. Each casing housings hundreds of tiny squid eggs. After the female squid has planted her egg casings to the sandy bottom, she will die. Professional stock photos of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 14931  
Species: Common squid, Loligo opalescens
 
Sand, water and light Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns Squid mating and laying eggs, eggs on sandy bottom, Loligo opalescens, La Jolla, California
Sand, water and light. Pictures of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 00304  
Location: Bahamas
 
Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns. Sandy Bottom Photo.
Image ID: 00701  
Location: Bahamas
 
Squid mating and laying eggs, eggs on sandy bottom. Sandy Bottom Picture.
Image ID: 02547  
Species: Common squid, Loligo opalescens
Location: La Jolla, California, USA
 
Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns Water patterns
Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns. Stock Photography of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 03185  
Location: Bahamas
 
Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns. Photograph of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 03186  
Location: Bahamas
 
Water patterns. Sandy Bottom Photos.
Image ID: 03187  
 
Water, sand and light, Sea of Cortez, La Paz, Baja California, Mexico Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns, Sea of Cortez, La Paz, Baja California, Mexico Sand ripples
Water, sand and light. Sandy Bottom Image.
Image ID: 04769  
Location: Sea of Cortez, La Paz, Baja California, Mexico
 
Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns. Professional stock photos of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 04770  
Location: Sea of Cortez, La Paz, Baja California, Mexico
 
Sand ripples. Pictures of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 05648  
 
Sand ripples Sand, water and light Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns
Sand ripples. Sandy Bottom Photo.
Image ID: 05649  
 
Sand, water and light. Sandy Bottom Picture.
Image ID: 05657  
Location: Bahamas
 
Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns. Stock Photography of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 05658  
Location: Bahamas
 
Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns Sand, water and light
Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns. Photograph of Sandy Bottom.
Image ID: 05659  
Location: Bahamas
 
Sunlight spreads across broad sand plains, trochoidal patterns. Sandy Bottom Photos.
Image ID: 05662  
Location: Bahamas
 
Sand, water and light. Sandy Bottom Image.
Image ID: 05664  
Location: Bahamas
 


Natural History Photography Blog post related to Sandy Bottom



Related Topics:



Keywords:

Page:   -1- 2   Next ›››   New Search
Categories Appearing Among These Images:
Animal  >  Fish  >  Fish Anatomy  >  Color and Pattern  >  Disruptive Coloration
Animal  >  Fish  >  Fish Behavior  >  Camoflage
Animal  >  Fish  >  Marine Fish  >  Grunt (Haemulidae)
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Otter  >  Sea Otter
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Echinoderm  >  Seastar / Starfish
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Marine Invertebrate Behavior  >  Reproduction / Mating
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Mollusk  >  Cephalopod  >  Squid
Gallery  >  Abstract
Gallery  >  Ocean And Light
Gallery  >  Squid
Location  >  Oceans  >  Atlantic  >  Bahamas
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)  >  Channel Islands  >  Santa Barbara Island
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Marine Sanctuaries  >  Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary  >  Santa Barbara Island
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Marine Sanctuaries  >  Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (California)  >  Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  Moss Landing  >  Elkhorn Slough
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  Santa Barbara
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  Santa Barbara Island
Location  >  World  >  Bahamas
Location  >  World  >  Mexico  >  Sea of Cortez
Natural World  >  Abstracts and Patterns  >  Marine Water Light Sand
Natural World  >  Habitat  >  Sandy Bottom
Plant  >  Marine Plant  >  Giant Kelp
Plant  >  Marine Plant  >  Grass
Subject  >  Inspirational
Subject  >  People  >  Underwater  >  SCUBA diver
Subject  >  People  >  Underwater  >  Underwater Videographer
Subject  >  Technique  >  Captivity  >  Aquarium
Subject  >  Technique  >  Underwater

Species Appearing Among These Images:
Citharichthys stigmaeus
Enhydra lutris
Loligo opalescens
Macrocystis pyrifera
Myliobatis californica
Pisaster giganteus
Thalassia testudinum

Natural History Photography Blog post related to Sandy Bottom
Photo of Mangrove Snapper in Three Sisters Spring

Search for:     

Updated: April 18, 2014