African darter, Anhinga rufa rufa



African darter.   Darters are also known as snakebirds because they swim with only their heads and necks out of the water.  A hinge mechanism at the birds eighth neck vertebra enables the bird to strike, snapping up insects on the water and stabbing fish.  A stabbed fish is shaken loose, flipped up in the air and swallowed head first., Anhinga rufa rufa, natural history stock photograph, photo id 12830
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African darter.   Darters are also known as snakebirds because they swim with only their heads and necks out of the water.  A hinge mechanism at the birds eighth neck vertebra enables the bird to strike, snapping up insects on the water and stabbing fish.  A stabbed fish is shaken loose, flipped up in the air and swallowed head first. Image #12831
African darter.   Darters are also known as snakebirds because they swim with only their heads and necks out of the water.  A hinge mechanism at the birds eighth neck vertebra enables the bird to strike, snapping up insects on the water and stabbing fish.  A stabbed fish is shaken loose, flipped up in the air and swallowed head first. Image #12832
African darter.   Darters are also known as snakebirds because they swim with only their heads and necks out of the water.  A hinge mechanism at the birds eighth neck vertebra enables the bird to strike, snapping up insects on the water and stabbing fish.  A stabbed fish is shaken loose, flipped up in the air and swallowed head first. Image #12833
African darter.   Darters are also known as snakebirds because they swim with only their heads and necks out of the water.  A hinge mechanism at the birds eighth neck vertebra enables the bird to strike, snapping up insects on the water and stabbing fish.  A stabbed fish is shaken loose, flipped up in the air and swallowed head first. Image #12834

African darter. Darters are also known as snakebirds because they swim with only their heads and necks out of the water. A hinge mechanism at the birds eighth neck vertebra enables the bird to strike, snapping up insects on the water and stabbing fish. A stabbed fish is shaken loose, flipped up in the air and swallowed head first.

Stock Photo: 12830
Species: African darter, Anhinga rufa rufa
Format: Digital 2:3
Copyright © Phillip Colla, all rights reserved worldwide.
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Keywords: african darter, anhinga, anhinga rufa rufa, anhingidae, animalia, aves, bird, chordata, pelecaniformes, rufa, vertebrata, vertebrate


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Updated: January 19, 2022

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