Abalone Photo


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Pink abalone, Haliotis corrugata, San Clemente Island Green abalone with mantle fringe visible extending outside shell, Haliotis fulgens A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
Pink abalone. Abalone Photo.
Image ID: 01058  
Species: Green abalone, Haliotis corrugata
Location: San Clemente Island, California, USA
 
Green abalone with mantle fringe visible extending outside shell. Abalone Picture.
Image ID: 09242  
Species: Green abalone, Haliotis fulgens
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Stock Photography of Abalone.
Image ID: 21612  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Photograph of Abalone.
Image ID: 21609  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Abalone Photos.
Image ID: 21622  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Abalone Image.
Image ID: 21640  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Professional stock photos of Abalone.
Image ID: 21652  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Pictures of Abalone.
Image ID: 21660  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Abalone Photo.
Image ID: 21661  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough.  Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone.  Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs, Enhydra lutris, Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
A sea otter eats a clam that it has taken from the shallow sandy bottom of Elkhorn Slough. Because sea otters have such a high metabolic rate, they eat up to 30% of their body weight each day in the form of clams, mussels, urchins, crabs and abalone. Sea otters are the only known tool-using marine mammal, using a stone or old shell to open the shells of their prey as they float on their backs. Abalone Picture.
Image ID: 21662  
Species: Sea otter, Enhydra lutris
Location: Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Landing, California, USA
 
Red abalone. Stock Photography of Abalone.
Image ID: 11822  
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
 
Red abalone. Photograph of Abalone.
Image ID: 11823  
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
 
Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens Green abalone, Haliotis fulgens
Red abalone. Abalone Photos.
Image ID: 11824  
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
 
Red abalone. Abalone Image.
Image ID: 11825  
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
 
Green abalone. Professional stock photos of Abalone.
Image ID: 12888  
Species: Green abalone, Haliotis fulgens
 
Spiny lobster and several abalone, Panulirus interruptus, San Clemente Island A California spiny lobster sits amid four red abalone on a shale reef shelf, Panulirus interruptus, Haliotis rufescens, San Diego Juvenile red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Spiny lobster and several abalone. Pictures of Abalone.
Image ID: 05375  
Species: Spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus
Location: San Clemente Island, California, USA
 
A California spiny lobster sits amid four red abalone on a shale reef shelf. Abalone Photo.
Image ID: 02546  
Species: Spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus, Haliotis rufescens
Location: San Diego, California, USA
 
Juvenile red abalone. Abalone Picture.
Image ID: 08633  
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
 
Juvenile red abalone, Haliotis rufescens Juvenile red abalone, Haliotis rufescens Juvenile red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
Juvenile red abalone. Stock Photography of Abalone.
Image ID: 08634  
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
 
Juvenile red abalone. Photograph of Abalone.
Image ID: 08635  
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
 
Juvenile red abalone. Abalone Photos.
Image ID: 08636  
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
 
Juvenile red abalone, Haliotis rufescens Red abalone eats Macrocystis kelp blade, Haliotis rufescens Green abalone with mantle fringe visible extending outside shell, Haliotis fulgens
Juvenile red abalone. Abalone Image.
Image ID: 08637  
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
 
Red abalone eats Macrocystis kelp blade. Professional stock photos of Abalone.
Image ID: 08916  
Species: Red abalone, Haliotis rufescens
 
Green abalone with mantle fringe visible extending outside shell. Pictures of Abalone.
Image ID: 09243  
Species: Green abalone, Haliotis fulgens
 
Green abalone, mantle and sight organs visible around edge of shell, Haliotis fulgens Green abalone, mantle and sight organs visible around edge of shell, Haliotis fulgens Granite structures form the underwater reef at Abalone Point, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)
Green abalone, mantle and sight organs visible around edge of shell. Abalone Photo.
Image ID: 09430  
Species: Green abalone, Haliotis fulgens
 
Green abalone, mantle and sight organs visible around edge of shell. Abalone Picture.
Image ID: 09431  
Species: Green abalone, Haliotis fulgens
 
Granite structures form the underwater reef at Abalone Point. Stock Photography of Abalone.
Image ID: 09541  
Location: Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe), Baja California, Mexico
 
Granite structures form the underwater reef at Abalone Point, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Granite structures form the underwater reef at Abalone Point, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe) Granite structures form the underwater reef at Abalone Point, Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)
Granite structures form the underwater reef at Abalone Point. Photograph of Abalone.
Image ID: 09542  
Location: Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe), Baja California, Mexico
 
Granite structures form the underwater reef at Abalone Point. Abalone Photos.
Image ID: 09543  
Location: Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe), Baja California, Mexico
 
Granite structures form the underwater reef at Abalone Point. Abalone Image.
Image ID: 09544  
Location: Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe), Baja California, Mexico
 


Natural History Photography Blog posts (5) related to Abalone



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Categories Appearing Among These Images:
Animal  >  Fish  >  Marine Fish  >  Indo-Pacific
Animal  >  Fish  >  Marine Fish  >  Tuna (Scombridae)
Animal  >  Mammal  >  Otter  >  Sea Otter
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Crustacean  >  Lobster
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Mollusk
Animal  >  Marine Invertebrate  >  Mollusk  >  Gastropods / Snail  >  Abalone
Gallery  >  Guadalupe Island
Gallery  >  Man And Animal
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)  >  Channel Islands  >  San Clemente Island
Location  >  Oceans  >  Pacific  >  California (USA) / Baja California (Mexico)  >  Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  International  >  Isla Guadalupe Special Biosphere Reserve (Mexico)
Location  >  Protected Threatened and Significant Places  >  National Marine Sanctuaries  >  Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (California)  >  Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  Moss Landing  >  Elkhorn Slough
Location  >  USA  >  California  >  San Clemente Island
Location  >  World  >  Mexico  >  Guadalupe Island (Isla Guadalupe)
Natural World  >  Habitat  >  Rocky Ocean Bottom
Subject  >  People  >  Underwater
Subject  >  People  >  Underwater  >  Freediver / Snorkler
Subject  >  People  >  Underwater  >  Spearfishermen / Spearfishing
Subject  >  Technique  >  Captivity  >  Aquarium
Subject  >  Technique  >  Underwater

Species Appearing Among These Images:
Enhydra lutris
Haliotis corrugata
Haliotis fulgens
Haliotis rufescens
Panulirus interruptus
Seriola lalandi
Thunnus albacares

Natural History Photography Blog posts (5) related to Abalone
Starlight and Moonlight on Little Corona, Newport Beach
Guadalupe Island :: First Impressions
Sea Otter Photos
Butterfly Cove at Sunrise, Guadalupe Island
Guadalupe Island Spearfishing World Record

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Updated: October 19, 2017