Propeller Wound on Florida Manatee

March 9, 2009Florida, Manatee, Wildlife

Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus) are often struck and injured by boats, in spite of laws intended to slow the passage of boats in areas inhabited by the slow-moving mammals. Manatees tend to rest below the surface, holding their breath, and surface without warning when they need to breathe. A boater who is moving too quickly or not paying attention can easily hit the manatee in such a situation. The result is frequently injury and sometimes death, either by virtue of the immediate trauma or by infection in the deep wound caused by the boat. In these photos, Florida manatees display scars, evidence of injuries from boats and/or boat propellers.

West Indian manatee with scarring/wound from boat propellor, Trichechus manatus, Homosassa River

West Indian manatee with scarring/wound from boat propellor.
Image ID: 03306
Species: West Indian manatee, Trichechus manatus
Location: Homosassa River, Florida, USA

West Indian manatee with scarring/wound from boat propellor, Trichechus manatus, Homosassa River

West Indian manatee with scarring/wound from boat propellor.
Image ID: 03307
Species: West Indian manatee, Trichechus manatus
Location: Homosassa River, Florida, USA

West Indian manatee with scarring/wound from boat propellor, Trichechus manatus, Homosassa River

West Indian manatee with scarring/wound from boat propellor.
Image ID: 03308
Species: West Indian manatee, Trichechus manatus
Location: Homosassa River, Florida, USA

See more boat strike photos, Florida manatee photos and Trichecus manatus photos.