Category

Redwood

Coast Redwood Tree, Sequoia sempervirens

California, Redwood, Trees

Stock photos of Sequoia sempervirens, the Coast Redwood Tree.

Sequoia sempervirens, also known as the Coast Redwood, Giant Redwood, or simply Redwood Tree, is the tallest species of tree in the world. The Coast Redwood tree is the only member of the genus Sequoia, part of the Cypress tree family. Reaching heights of 380′ (115m), the Coast Redwood is also one of the oldest and largest (most massive) organisms in the world, living as long as 3500 years and growing to over 25′ (8m) in diameter and 42,000 cubic feet.

Giant redwood, Lady Bird Johnson Grove, Redwood National Park.  The coastal redwood, or simply 'redwood', is the tallest tree on Earth, reaching a height of 379' and living 3500 years or more.  It is native to coastal California and the southwestern corner of Oregon within the United States, but most concentrated in Redwood National and State Parks in Northern California, found close to the coast where moisture and soil conditions can support its unique size and growth requirements, Sequoia sempervirens

Giant redwood, Lady Bird Johnson Grove, Redwood National Park. The coastal redwood, or simply ‘redwood’, is the tallest tree on Earth, reaching a height of 379′ and living 3500 years or more. It is native to coastal California and the southwestern corner of Oregon within the United States, but most concentrated in Redwood National and State Parks in Northern California, found close to the coast where moisture and soil conditions can support its unique size and growth requirements.
Image ID: 25800
Species: Coast redwood, giant redwood, California redwood, Sequoia sempervirens
Location: Redwood National Park, California, USA

The natural range of the Coast Redwood is quite limited, comprising a strip of coastline in northern California and southern Oregon about 470 miles long but extending inland only about 50 miles and typically much less. Coast Redwood trees thrive in this region due in part to the large amounts of moisture that reach the groves through fog that originates over the ocean, as well as plenty of rain (up to 100″ annually). Redwoods that live above the fog layer, and thus only receive moisture in the form of rain and are subject to colder and more arid conditions, are significantly shorter and less massive than those lower and closer to the coast.

Giant redwood, Lady Bird Johnson Grove, Redwood National Park.  The coastal redwood, or simply 'redwood', is the tallest tree on Earth, reaching a height of 379' and living 3500 years or more.  It is native to coastal California and the southwestern corner of Oregon within the United States, but most concentrated in Redwood National and State Parks in Northern California, found close to the coast where moisture and soil conditions can support its unique size and growth requirements, Sequoia sempervirens

Giant redwood, Lady Bird Johnson Grove, Redwood National Park. The coastal redwood, or simply ‘redwood’, is the tallest tree on Earth, reaching a height of 379′ and living 3500 years or more. It is native to coastal California and the southwestern corner of Oregon within the United States, but most concentrated in Redwood National and State Parks in Northern California, found close to the coast where moisture and soil conditions can support its unique size and growth requirements.
Image ID: 25799
Species: Coast redwood, giant redwood, California redwood, Sequoia sempervirens
Location: Redwood National Park, California, USA

Coast redwood, or simply 'redwood', the tallest tree on Earth, reaching a height of 379' and living 3500 years or more.  It is native to coastal California and the southwestern corner of Oregon within the United States, but most concentrated in Redwood National and State Parks in Northern California, found close to the coast where moisture and soil conditions can support its unique size and growth requirements, Sequoia sempervirens, Redwood National Park

Coast redwood, or simply ‘redwood’, the tallest tree on Earth, reaching a height of 379′ and living 3500 years or more. It is native to coastal California and the southwestern corner of Oregon within the United States, but most concentrated in Redwood National and State Parks in Northern California, found close to the coast where moisture and soil conditions can support its unique size and growth requirements.
Image ID: 25801
Species: Coast redwood, giant redwood, California redwood, Sequoia sempervirens
Location: Redwood National Park, California, USA

Coast Redwood trees reproduce sexually through small winged seeds that are dispersed up to 300′ (100m) from the parent tree. Seedlings grow quickly, up to 8′ in their first season. Asexual reproduction is also common, especially when a mature Redwood tree falls: multiple new trees may sprout from the fallen log.

Roosevelt Elk, Cervus canadensis roosevelti

Elk, Redwood

Photos of Roosevelt Elk (Cervus canadensis roosevelti) in Redwood National Park

The Roosevelt Elk (Cervus canadensis roosevelti) is the largest of the four surviving subspecies of elk in North America. Roosevelt elk are found in temperate rainforests and meadows of the Pacific Northwest, including Olympic and Redwood National Park. Only male Roosevelt elk grow antlers, which are covered in a skin-like “velvet” until the antlers are fully grown, at which point the velvet is shed. A bull, or adult male, elk shown below is shedding the last of its velvet. The antlers, which grow to 4′ long, are dropped each winter only to be regrown the following spring. We had a herd of wild Roosevelt elk near our cabin during much of our stay in Redwood National Park, much to the delight of my kids. One evening I was able to photograph them just a few feet from the back porch, occasionally leaving my camera on its tripod for a few moments to return to the BBQ and flip the steaks I was grilling and then go back to the elk for more photos. Thank goodness for high ISO cameras, my Roosevelt elk photographs were shot in very low light.

Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers.  Roosevelt elk grow to 10' and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest, Cervus canadensis roosevelti, Redwood National Park, California

Roosevelt elk, adult bull male with large antlers. Roosevelt elk grow to 10′ and 1300 lb, eating grasses, sedges and various berries, inhabiting the coastal rainforests of the Pacific Northwest.
Image ID: 25885
Species: Roosevelt elk, Cervus canadensis roosevelti
Location: Redwood National Park, California, USA

Keywords: Roosevelt elk, Roosevelt Elk, Cervus canadensis roosevelti, wapiti, Redwood National Park.

Lady Bird Johnson Grove, Redwood National Park

California, Redwood, Trees

Lady Bird Johnson Grove in Redwood National Park is gorgeous. From clover and ferns covering the soil to tall rhododendron bushes at eye level to the coast redwood trees (Sequoia sempervirens) and Douglas firs towering above, this grove seems to harbor countless shades of green and brown. I spent two mornings in Lady Bird Johnson Grove recently, not seeing another person either morning**, and really enjoyed my time among these epic trees. Fortunately for my cameras, on the second morning I was blessed with light fog that produced sufficiently soft light that I was able to obtain the type of evenly exposed images of these giant redwoods I was hoping to make.

Giant redwood, Lady Bird Johnson Grove, Redwood National Park.  The coastal redwood, or simply 'redwood', is the tallest tree on Earth, reaching a height of 379' and living 3500 years or more.  It is native to coastal California and the southwestern corner of Oregon within the United States, but most concentrated in Redwood National and State Parks in Northern California, found close to the coast where moisture and soil conditions can support its unique size and growth requirements, Sequoia sempervirens

Giant redwood, Lady Bird Johnson Grove, Redwood National Park. The coastal redwood, or simply ‘redwood’, is the tallest tree on Earth, reaching a height of 379′ and living 3500 years or more. It is native to coastal California and the southwestern corner of Oregon within the United States, but most concentrated in Redwood National and State Parks in Northern California, found close to the coast where moisture and soil conditions can support its unique size and growth requirements.
Image ID: 25795
Species: Coast redwood, giant redwood, California redwood, Sequoia sempervirens
Location: Redwood National Park, California, USA

The most useful lens in this grove was my Canon 16-35mm f/2.8 II. I find that my copy of this lens is very sharp at f/8-16 at all focal lengths except 16mm, so when I wanted a very wide image I would rack the zoom ring all the way out and then just back off a tiny bit (17mm?). I did shoot a few HDR images since upward looking compositions in a forest can be difficult to expose properly. HDR, or high dynamic range photography, uses a sequence of images in which the exposure is systematically varied and, when later combined on a computer using special software, hopefully results in an image that has greater range than can be obtained in a single exposure. However, I find that natural-looking results are usually difficult to obtain with HDR software, and my attempts with redwood trees were no different, so I have included only five HDR images (created using Photomatix from 3-5 original frames) in the images I have kept for my files. I was, however, pleasantly surprised to find that the noise on my Canon 1Ds Mark III and Canon 5D Mark II cameras, combined with ISO 100 and long exposure times, was low enough that I was able to sufficiently lighten shadow areas to make the images I originally envisioned.

Ferns grow below coastal redwood and Douglas Fir trees, Lady Bird Johnson Grove, Redwood National Park.  The coastal redwood, or simply 'redwood', is the tallest tree on Earth, reaching a height of 379' and living 3500 years or more.  It is native to coastal California and the southwestern corner of Oregon within the United States, but most concentrated in Redwood National and State Parks in Northern California, found close to the coast where moisture and soil conditions can support its unique size and growth requirements, Sequoia sempervirens

Ferns grow below coastal redwood and Douglas Fir trees, Lady Bird Johnson Grove, Redwood National Park. The coastal redwood, or simply ‘redwood’, is the tallest tree on Earth, reaching a height of 379′ and living 3500 years or more. It is native to coastal California and the southwestern corner of Oregon within the United States, but most concentrated in Redwood National and State Parks in Northern California, found close to the coast where moisture and soil conditions can support its unique size and growth requirements.
Image ID: 25796
Species: Coast redwood, giant redwood, California redwood, Sequoia sempervirens
Location: Redwood National Park, California, USA

Commemoration plaque in Lady Bird Johnson Grove, marking the place where President Richard Nixon dedicated this coastal redwood grove to Lady Bird Johnson, an environmental activist and former first lady, Sequoia sempervirens, Redwood National Park, California

Commemoration plaque in Lady Bird Johnson Grove, marking the place where President Richard Nixon dedicated this coastal redwood grove to Lady Bird Johnson, an environmental activist and former first lady.
Image ID: 25808
Species: Coast redwood, giant redwood, California redwood, Sequoia sempervirens
Location: Redwood National Park, California, USA

**Make sure to get there early so that the tranquility of your visit is not brought crashing down to Earth by the laughter of kids playing tag along the path or the shouts of their parents trying to rein them in.

Redwood National Park Video

Elk, National Parks, Redwood, Video

Redwood National Park Video

We spent a few days relaxing in Orick, California, in the heart of Redwood National Park. We enjoyed some great hikes among the towering coastal redwood trees, a little horseback riding, some uncrowded and beautiful beaches, and lots of Roosevelt elk that reside in the meadows just outside the window of the little cabin we stayed in. Here is a short film I made to test out a couple aspects of how the Canon 5D Mark II and Panasonic Lumix LX3 cameras record video. I was trying a variety of methods for panning a dSLR while recording video, some of them more successful that others. These passages are basically straight out of the camera, with only minimal assembly and processing in iMovie. I did shoot some “serious photos” but it will take me a while to get them processed and on this website. I was surprised at how simple and fast it can be to shoot video and edit it into a little film, this took just an hour or so to make. What did I learn? I learned that I need a proper external microphone if I want to have any hope of recording decent audio, and that I should turn image stabilization off when I record video since the stabilizer can be heard whirring on the audio track. I also can tell that Youtube uses some heavy compression (not surprising), since the Youtube version of this film below has some jerkiness and compression artifacts that do not appear in the original.